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Art

New ‘8-Bit’ Watercolor Paintings Inspired by Famous Artworks and Pop Culture Icons by Adam Lister

January 4, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Bar at the Folies Bergere

Bar at the Folies Bergere

Adam Lister (previously here and here) recreates famous artworks with watercolor paintings that appear as if they have been pulled directly from a 1980s Atari. The modulated technique makes each image appear futuristic, even if the work is a reimagining of the late 19th century Georges Seurat piece A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.

In addition to producing recreations of famous paintings in this nearly cubist style, Lister also paints portraits of famous pop icons, previous works including Popeye and Darth Vader. This September Lister had a solo exhibition at White Walls in San Francsico titled “Elucidation.” The exhibition featured many of his regular-sized works as well as a few miniature paintings that featured subjects from Monopoly boards to Damien Hirst’s famous tiger shark suspended in formaldehyde (“The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living“).

You can browse his limited edition prints and new releases on his website here.

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The Great Wave, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

The School of Athens, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

The School of Athens, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Olympia after Manet

Olympia after Manet

Lady with an Ermine after da Vinci

Lady with an Ermine after da Vinci

La velata after Raphael

La velata after Raphael

bb8, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

bb8, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Boba Fett and Darth Vader, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Boba Fett and Darth Vader, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

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Hirst, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Hirst, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Monopoly, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Monopoly, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Popeye, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Popeye, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

 

 



Art

The Soft, Memory-Laden Oil Paintings of Joshua Flint

December 29, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

Migration | oil on wood panel | 30" x 30"

Migration | oil on wood panel | 30″ x 30″

The oil paintings of Joshua Flint look like depictions of memories when one tries too hard to access the faded thoughts—worn corners, blurred faces, and transposed scenes that don’t quite make sense. Each work has a familiar element that seems to be cast in a dark and foreboding haze like Sandcastles, a dark painting that disguises whether the included children are building or destroying the miniature city that lies before them.

“There is a dynamic interplay between experience and interpretation,” says Flint about his work. “What is remembered isn’t necessarily descriptive of the actual event. Once the experience has passed through our emotional filter we assign meaning to it, changing the actualities. My paintings explore that place in-between a direct translation and the abstract of emotion.”

Flint has a current exhibition titled “The World Between” at Sumter County Gallery of Art in Sumter, South Carolina which continues until January 8, 2016. You can see more of his oil paintings and in-process sketches on his Instagram here. (via Booooooom)

Memory Palace | oil on wood panel | 24" x 24"

Memory Palace | oil on wood panel | 24″ x 24″

The Banquet | oil on canvas | 48" x 60"

The Banquet | oil on canvas | 48″ x 60″

They Feed the Earth | Oil on Canvas | 48" x 48"

They Feed the Earth | Oil on Canvas | 48″ x 48″

Mapping a Galaxy | oil on wood panel | 30" x 30"

Mapping a Galaxy | oil on wood panel | 30″ x 30″

Bright Reflections | Oil on Wood | 24" x 24"

Bright Reflections | Oil on Wood | 24″ x 24″

The Wide Arena of Air | oil on wood panel | 36" x 36"

The Wide Arena of Air | oil on wood panel | 36″ x 36″

Sandcastles | oil on canvas | 48" x 48"

Sandcastles | oil on canvas | 48″ x 48″

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Haphazardly Wrapped Packages and Gifts by Yrjö Edelmann

December 23, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

The works of Yrjö Edelmann are so precise that they translate without question as photograph. Even with double, triple, and quadruple takes it is nearly impossible to imagine that the pieces have been produced from precisely placed oil paint. The objects Edelmann depicts are not perfectly wrapped pieces, but rather haphazardly taped and constructed, often on irregularly shaped canvases to heighten the trompe-l’œil effect. Scotch tape and twine hold the wrapping paper in place, with wrinkles covering the bright and often reflective package’s surface.

Edelmann was born in 1941 in Finland, and studied at the University College of Arts in Stockholm, Sweden. Edelmann is represented by Craighead Green Gallery in Dallas, Gallerie GKM in Malmö, and Scott Richards Contemporary Art in San Francisco where he has an upcoming solo exhibition in March of 2016. You explore more of his work in detail on Artsy.  (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

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Image courtesy of Scott Richards Contemporary Art

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Image courtesy of Scott Richards Contemporary Art

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Art History

New Anonymous Portraits Liberated From Their Museum Frames by Julien de Casabianca

December 10, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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We are often inundated with images of famous artworks, pieces even the most disconnected art viewer can name on the spot. These portraits however make up a very small percentage of the work in museums worldwide, the majority of faces either nameless or not burned into memory—men, women, and children immortalized by brushstroke but forgotten by time. These anonymous faces are the ones that French artist Julien de Casabianca (previously) is most drawn to, and has been “liberating” for the last few years by placing recreations of the unknown on urban street corners and abandoned buildings as a part of his Outings Project.

Since its inception the project has gone global—Oslo, Geneva, and Warsaw included in the recent cities that have received their own wheatpasted faces. De Casabianca was invited by the Cummer Museum in Jacksonville, FL to create a few pieces, including one that stands two-stories tall, a young girl in a bonnet peering away from the viewer and into the boarded-up brick wall on which she is placed. Other works of his are less conspicuous, characters hiding behind drooped plants or crouched on the ground at knee-level, glancing at the viewer from urban streets rather than behind museum quality glass.

The project has always been intended to be participatory, de Casabianca inviting anyone to photograph and “free” images from museums in their own city. De Casabianca will show his own work in Belgium next year at the Musée d’Ixelles from March 5th to April 10th. More of de Casabianca’s pieces can be found on his online gallery, Facebook, and Instagram.

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Outings

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Amazing Art Design

This Translucent Cube Hides Six Handpainted Anamorphic Images

December 4, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Thomas Medicus (previously) just unveiled a new anamorphic sculpture titled Emergence Lab that contains six handpainted images inside a large translucent cube. The six fragmented paintings are spread across 216 laser-cut acrylic glass strips that are designed to perfectly align when viewed directly from each side. Each figure is cleverly contained within the same surface as its counterpart on the opposite side, and the object is filled with silicone oil giving it the look and feel of solid glass. Watch the video to see how it works, and Medicus shares some behind the scenes photos of his design process. You can also follow him on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Art

Kelly Reemtsen’s Painterly Juxtapositions of Chic Dresses and Power Tools Showcase Modern Femininity

November 16, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

Labor-Force (1)

Labor Force, 2015

Los Angeles-based painter Kelly Reemtsen's newest works focus on the subject matter of well-dressed women toting household tools that range from mallets to power saws, each held in a causal position that demonstrates a comfortableness with the object in-hand. Each figure is anonymous, the head of the woman not included in the cropped images of dress, heels, and tool.

The collective works question what makes the modern woman, flouncy dresses coordinating with more masculine tools to showcase the objects’ relatability rather than create a contrast between the woman and her wrenches and shears. The brightly colored impasto paintings each provide a burst of color—yellow, greens, and pinks catching the eye.

Reemtsen just closed a new exhibition of work titled “Smashing” at De Buck Gallery in New York and is also represented by David Klein Gallery, which relocated to Detroit this fall. Her 2013 book “I’m Falling” won both the Independent Spirit Award and 2014 Independent Publisher Books Award.

Unstuck

Unstuck, 2015

Shear-Bliss

Shear Bliss, 2015

Spotted

Spotted, 2015

Forced

Forced, 2015

Handled

Handled, 2015

I Pick You, 2015

I Pick You, 2015

Striking-Distance

Striking Distance, 2015

 

 



Art

Hatched from a Discarded Egg on a Chicago Windowsill, ‘Camp’ the Pigeon Becomes a Muse for Adele Renault’s Giant Oil Paintings

November 5, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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In the summer of 2013, Chicago artist George Keaton and photographer Mariah Naella were preparing for their engagement party in Wisconsin when they made a seemingly insignificant discovery that would soon dramatically impact their life. Repairmen who were replacing old window frames in their apartment had quietly left something on their kitchen counter: a tiny egg. The workers had inadvertently destroyed a pigeon nest while fixing windows and randomly decided to salvage the egg.

The couple tells the Chicago Sun Times that in the process of discarding the egg outside, Naella realized something was moving inside of it. Within minutes—and to their great astonishment—it almost immediately began to hatch. Late that night the couple purchased a small syringe at Walgreens to use for feeding, and the next few weeks were dedicated to rearing a peppy little pigeon they named Camp.

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Two months later, following advice from a wildlife expert, they decided Camp was large enough to release into the wild, but upon opening the window they discovered he was completely uninterested in leaving. Camp has since become accustomed to flying near their Lincoln Square home, and is free to come and go as he pleases, but has never traveled far and always returns home. The pigeon is now a part of the family, and has become a bit of a local celebrity whose daily adventures are shared on Instagram. He’s even spawned an entire line of prints, jewelry, and and shirts.

On learning about Camp’s story randomly through Instagram, Belgian painter Adele Renault realized she had a new muse. Renault is known for her large-scale photorealistic portraits of people and pigeons, and it wasn’t long before she began documenting the Chicago bird’s adventures in lockstep with Naella and Keaton. A selection of her giant oil on linen paintings depicting Camp during several stages of his life will be on view starting tomorrow at Havas Annex in Chicago. (via Colossal Submissions)

Follow the daily adventures of Camp the pigeon on Instagram.

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