Tag Archives: painting

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten-ten

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Miharu Matsunaga: Ten ten portraits people painting multiples

Using thousands of meticulously painted dots (“ten-ten” in Japanese) designer and photographer Miharu Matsunaga has been exploring the interconnectedness of people and places in these two recently completed projects. The first, a series of mottled portraits was completed as part of her graduate work at Tama Art University. The delicate white dots are meant as a visual display of the often neglected and forgotten interconnectedness between “family, parents, sister, friend, man, woman, adult, baby, race,” and people of different languages. Matsunaga continues this organic, dotted exploration in Ten-ten wherein the dots are used to cover interior walls, vehicles, and other objects. Stunning work. (via spoon and tamago)

Paintings by Amanda Clyne

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

I’m really enjoying these vertically sliced portraits by Amanda Clyne who uses images from fashion magazines as a starting point for a rather involved process, that I’ll let her explain in her own words.

I begin my process by culling images from fashion magazines. Cropping the image into a portrait, I re-print the image on to a surface to which the printing ink does not adhere, so the image remains wet. I photograph the print as the fluid image morphs and dissolves over time. I then compose a new image from fragments of these photographs—each image each is comprised of slices of the image at various stages of dissolution. Once I have resolved the final composition, I project the basic outlines of the image onto a canvas, and use a print-out of my composition as a painting reference. Each fragment is taped off and painted separately. Because of the narrow width of the fragments (some are less than 1/4 inch wide), I usually paint every third fragment, then while I wait for those fragments to dry, I paint alternating fragments on a different painting. Some paintings require three or four rounds of painting, so I work on several paintings at once.

The results are really quite striking. Clyne will have three new works on display at Art Toronto at the end of October. Thanks Amanda for sharing your work with Colossal!

New Oil Paintings by Simon Birch

New Oil Paintings by Simon Birch portraits people painting

New Oil Paintings by Simon Birch portraits people painting

New Oil Paintings by Simon Birch portraits people painting

New Oil Paintings by Simon Birch portraits people painting

New Oil Paintings by Simon Birch portraits people painting

I’ve been viscerally aware of Simon Birch’s paintings for some time, but it wasn’t until stumbling onto his latest series, Laughing With a Mouth Full of Blood, that I really stopped to consider his staggering talent. The paintings from this series use bold, bright color that’s applied in angular, almost geometric brush strokes creating these wonderful portraits. Birch is a U.K.-born artist of Armenian descent who now lives and works in Hong Kong. He’s represented by Future Industries where you can see many more paintings from this exhibition. (via nevver)

Kim Yong Soo

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

Kim Yong Soo painting electronics birds

I was delighted to stumble onto the work of Korean artist Kim Yong Soo whose artwork, at first glance, takes on the somewhat familiar appearance of traditional Japanese paintings of cherry tree bossoms. Closer inspection reveals a textured assemblage of semi-conductors, speaker wires, and acrylic cement, used to form the delicate tree branches, flowers, and ominous humanoid figures that bring an unexpectedly dark presence to these otherwise serene paintings.

Blitzstein Exhibit

Blitzstein Exhibit wood portraits painting abstract

I admit, I don’t know the story behind this one. It popped up on suplove (warning, music) a few hours ago and is entitled simply “Blitzstein Exhibit” and is dated 1994 on the bottom. Edvard Munch approved.

Update: Via email Nathan Bowers says: “The Blitzstein Exhibit is on Fairfax in L.A. Across the street from Canter’s Deli. The piece you linked is in the storefront window. I can’t tell if the place is a gallery or a studio because I’ve never seen anyone inside and none of the pieces have seemed to move since at least 1996. Mysterious!” It looks like this is a piece by Harry Blitzstein, and here he is jumping rope on a trampoline. Thanks Nathan!

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton painting gravity

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton painting gravity

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton painting gravity

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton painting gravity

Incredible Brushless Paintings by Amy Shackleton painting gravity

First: watch the video. Twenty-five year old, Toronto-based artist Amy Shackleton paints these lusciously drippy paintings without use of a brush or fingers, instead she relies on good old gravity (and occasionally string as a guide) to move the paint slowly across the canvas in delicately controlled pours. The video above captures the somewhat tedious yet brilliant process in detail, as a 30-hour painting session condensed into two minutes. I find this so unbelievably amazing and beautiful. See more of her work here, and you’ll have a chance to see it in person at Art Toronto 2011 in October. (via gizmodo)

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia textiles painting embroidery

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia textiles painting embroidery

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia textiles painting embroidery

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia textiles painting embroidery

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia textiles painting embroidery

Thread Paintings by Cayce Zavaglia textiles painting embroidery

Cayce Zavaglia creates these impossibly layered embroidered portraits using methods more akin to delicate brush strokes with perfectly mixed paint than your mother’s cross-stitch. Via her website:

Initially, working with an established range of wool colors proved frustrating. Unlike painting, I was unable to mix the colors by hand. Progressively, I created a system of sewing the threads in a sequence that would ultimately give the allusion of a certain color or tone. The direction in which the threads were sewn had to mimic the way lines are layered in a drawing to give the allusion of depth, volume, and form. Over time the stitches have become tighter and more complex but ultimately more evocative of flesh, hair, and cloth.

Her online porftolio contains another 14 unique portraits. (via rhumboogie)

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Classic Hollywood Paintings, Now in 3D Acrylic pop culture painting movies celebrities 3d

Freelance art director, designer, and painter Stefan Da Costa Gomez has been working on a series of 3D acrylic paintings featuring a number of Hollywood personalities who each met a tragic fate, the idea being that when viewed through anaglyph 3D glasses the celebrities come back to life, so to speak. The series includes paintings of Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Humphrey Bogart, and the wildly popular but ill-fated animated character Oswald who was scrapped due to a contractual fallout between Universal Studios and Disney, giving immediate rise to none other than Steamboat Willie. See many more detail shots of Gomez’s work here. Can’t wait to see more from this series.

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