Tag Archives: playgrounds

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

Danish design firm Monstrum (previously) continues to redefine the modern playscape, constructing numerous fantastical scenes for kids to climb on in locations around the world. Founded by Ole B. Nielsen and Christian Jensen, the award-winning firm has an extensive background in theatrical set design in theaters throughout Copenhagen that strongly influences their groundbreaking aesthetic. Each new playground becomes the backdrop for a dramatic scene, from towering robots to hoards of attacking insects. For their most recent creation in Moscow’s famous Gorky Park, Mostrum constructed a gargantuan octopus overtaking a huge oceanliner, complete with slides, cargo nets and climbing walls (shown above in subzero temperatures). See more recent work in their project portfolio.

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Aligator Playground in São Paulo by Olek playgrounds crochet Brasil

Crocheted Jacaré is the latest work from Brooklyn-based artist Olek, who traveled to Brasil for the 2012 SESC Arts Show in order to encase a massive playground shaped like an alligator in her trademark crochet covering. With the help of several colleagues Olek covered the reptilian playscape in North Carolinian acrylic yarn and Brazilian ribbons over a period of several weeks. The SESC show runs through July 29th and you can see much more of Olek’s work on her website. All images courtesy Lost Art. (via designboom)

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam  playgrounds kids

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam  playgrounds kids

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam  playgrounds kids

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam  playgrounds kids

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam  playgrounds kids

Crochet Playgrounds by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam  playgrounds kids

In the mid 1990s Japanese artist Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam was showing a large scale crochet artwork at an art gallery when two rambunctious children approached her and asked if the sculpture, resembling a colorful hammock, could be climbed on. She nervously agreed and watched cautiously as her suspended artwork twisted and stretched as the kids climbed on top of it. Suddenly an idea was born. Almost three years later MacAdam would open her first large-scale crochet playground in conjunction with engineers TIS & Partners and landscape architects Takano Landscape Planning. She has since created several additional playscapes around Japan, photos of which were recently made available for the first time online only a few weeks ago. However the MobileMe site where the projects were hosted seems to be permanently down, but Paige over at the Playscapes blog managed to highlight a few of the most interesting shots. Hopefully a new site will go up before long.

Update: Their website and portfolio is now back up.

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum playgrounds kids Denmark

Danish firm Monstrum, founded by Ole B. Nielsen and Christian Jensen, are responsible for some of the most brilliant playscapes I’ve ever seen. From life-size blue whales, giant serpents, and wobbly castles, any one of these would have been my dream come true as a child. See many more examples in their project gallery. (via super punch)

Treeless Treehouse

Treeless Treehouse wood trees playgrounds architecture

Treeless Treehouse wood trees playgrounds architecture

Treeless Treehouse wood trees playgrounds architecture

Treeless Treehouse wood trees playgrounds architecture

Treeless Treehouse wood trees playgrounds architecture

Treeless Treehouse wood trees playgrounds architecture

The Treeless Treehouse is a cantilevered, inverted octagonal cone treehouse designed by Roderick Romero and constructed in less than two weeks with the help of Ian Weedman, and Jeff Casper. Via email Jeff writes:

The “treeless treehouse” was built high on a hillside site in Bel Air, California. The location lacked trees mature enough to support a structure of this magnitude, so this cantilevered, inverted octagonal cone of wood was anchored into a deep, cubical-shaped concrete foundation. A twisting tornado of Forest Stewardship Council (F.S.C.) certified mixed-species reclaimed Brazilian hardwoods were milled, pre-drilled & mounted around a burly framework of reclaimed vintage Douglas Fir beams. The entrance to this elevated observatory is accessed through a hidden opening in the west facing side of this chaotic, angularly wrapped nest.

I grew up in the Texas hill country amongst similar treehouse-challenged terrain and would have killed to have such an incredible structure. Here’s a video of some additional construction shots. If you liked this also check out the Knit Fort. Thanks to John Casper for the photos! (via core77)

Double Happiness Billboard Swing Set

Double Happiness Billboard Swing Set swings street art recycling playgrounds architecture

Architect Didier Faustino created this epic swing set out of a converted advertising billboard for the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Bi-City Biennial of Urbanism and Architecture.

Double Happiness responds to the society of materialism where individual desires seem to be prevailing over all. This nomad piece of urban furniture allows the reactivation of different public spaces and enables inhabitants to reappropriate fragments of their city. They will both escape and dominate public space through a game of equilibrium and desequilibrium. By playing this “risky” game, and testing their own limits, two persons can experience together a new perception of space and recover an awareness of the physical world.

(via brokencitylab)

Dietrich Wegner

Dietrich Wegner sculpture playgrounds

Dietrich Wegner sculpture playgrounds

Dietrich Wegner sculpture playgrounds

Dietrich Wegner sculpture playgrounds

Dietrich Wegner sculpture playgrounds

Smoke plume tree houses and homes on stilts by artist Dietrich Wegner. (via booooooom)

The Knit Fort: A Flexible Playspace

The Knit Fort: A Flexible Playspace wood playgrounds kids architecture

The Knit Fort: A Flexible Playspace wood playgrounds kids architecture

The Knit Fort: A Flexible Playspace wood playgrounds kids architecture

The Knit Fort: A Flexible Playspace wood playgrounds kids architecture

When I was a kid we were lucky to have a stick, an old car tire, and and on a really good day maybe some mud. There’s certainly nothing wrong with that, and there’s nothing wrong with this incredible play structure, either. The Knit Fort is a gorgeous playspace created by Matt Ganon Studio. The carefully interlinked walls allow for a flexible, organic form that can be pushed and pulled to create new shapes and spaces.

The assembly technique, similar to knitting, allows the addition or subtraction of columns responding to the site context without altering the design. Depending on the scale, the surface can remain elastic allowing the occupant to manipulate and deform the profile. The shape can be expanded or contracted to alter the apertures of the space. The participatory aspect of the surface prolongs the process of creation and allows fine tuning the boundary of the space.

If I was a kid this would cease being a fort and quickly become a permanent residence. (via ok great)

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