Tag Archives: typography

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Residents of a neighborhood in Baltimore now have the most obvious place to wait for a bus ever designed. The ingenious stop is comprised of three 14′ typographic sculptures that literally spell out the word “BUS” while functioning as benches and a novel leisure space. The bus stop was unveiled last month by artist collective mmmm…, a creative collaboration between Emilio Alarcón, Alberto Alarcón, Ciro Márquez, and Eva Salmerón, who have been designing public spaces in Madrid since 1998. This is their second project in the United States. Via the collective’s website:

BUS is made with wood and steel, materials that are typically used to build urban furniture. The three letters of BUS are big enough to accommodate two to four people each and protect them from rain, sun, wind, and inclement weather. They allow people to assume different postures of sitting or standing while waiting for the bus. The S allows people to lie back while they wait, and the B provides shelter.

The BUS project was developed in conjunction with SPAIN arts & culture, Creative Alliance, and is part of TRANSIT, a creative placemaking initiative between Europe and Baltimore. You can see much more, here. (via Escape Kit)

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3D Calligraphy by Tolga Girgin

3D Calligraphy by Tolga Girgin typography calligraphy

3D Calligraphy by Tolga Girgin typography calligraphy

I just stumbled onto the Instagram account of Tolga Girgin, a Turkish graphic designer and electrical engineer who experiments with calligraphy. His latest pieces involve a number of 3D lettering pieces that use shadow and perspective to make it appear like the letterforms are lifting off the page. Very cool.

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Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

Painted Typography by Pawel Nolbert typography posters and prints paint illustration digital

This interesting blend of paint and typography by Warsaw-based designer Pawel Nolbert was created by photographing actual paint splatters and merging them with digital illustration techniques. Titled Atypical, he describes the series of posters as an exploration of the form and rhythm of letterforms “presented as half-realistic, half-illustrative figurative sculptures.” You can see more on his website, and prints are available on Society6. (via Illusion)

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Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Famous Quotes Illustrated on Chalkboards by an Anonymous Student Duo typography student illustration chalk

Two anonymous art students, who go by the moniker dangerdust, have been creating gorgeous hand-lettered and illustrated chalkboards featuring inspiring quotes from literary and public figures. Every Monday a new piece, rendered entirely by chalk, appears on the common chalkboard, only to be ephemerally replaced the following week. “Despite our overwhelming workload at Columbus College of Art & Design we bring it upon ourselves to create a chalkboard every week,” say the two students, explaining the motivation behind their late-night rogue art. Each piece, with its cleverly placed backdrop and bold composition, is as unique as the quote itself. They’re created in one fell swoop, which can take up to 11 hours. Like the students say themselves, “it’s the best form of vandalism.” Even if you’re not a student at their school you can follow their weekly creations on behance or Instagram. (via designboom)

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Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Beautiful Stippled Hand Lettering and Illustrations by Xavier Casalta typography stippling illustration

Using a black Isograph 0.10mm pen, French illustrator Xavier Casalta draws a cluster of dots the size of a speck of dust and follows with a few hundred thousand more to create swooping letterforms, shadows, and gradients. Only 21 years of age the artist already possesses a commendable sense of typography and composition as is exemplified in his ‘The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog’ project that involves a visual interpretation of the phrase in 10 different designs. You can see more of Casalta’s work on his website and pickup limited edition prints in his shop. (via Fubiz)

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A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

A 19th Century Lithographer Transforms the Alphabet into a Series of Sweeping Landscapes typography lithographs landscapes illustration alphabet

Buried in the archives of the British Museum is this wonderful series of lithographs from illustrator Charles Joseph Hullmandel that transforms the English alphabet into sweeping landscapes. Hullmandel was one of the most important figures in the advancement of British lithography in the first half of the 19th century. These particular pieces were produced sometime between 1818 and 1860 and you can see the full collection here. (via Juxtapoz)

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The Gap: A New Typographic Interpretation of Ira Glass’s Iconic Quote About the Creative Process

The Gap: A New Typographic Interpretation of Ira Glasss Iconic Quote About the Creative Process typography Ira Glass creativity

This beautiful visual accompaniment to Ira Glass’ iconic quote about the creative process was created by Daniel Sax after encountering a similar video by David Shiyang Liu that was shared extensively back in 2012. Great to see such a wonderful sound bite still inspiring people to make new stuff. (via Quipsologies)

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