Tag Archives: wood

Stunning Entryway of the Nishi Building Includes a Suspended Ceiling of 2,150 Reclaimed Boards from Old Homes and a Basketball Court 


The team at Australian firm March Studio (previously) are currently finishing work on this amazing interior staircase for the Japanese-inspired Nishi building in Canberra, Australia. The building is billed as “Australia’s most radically sustainable mixed-use building and apartment complex,” and if this interior treatment is any indication, it seems they might have achieved that goal. The stairwell and ceiling is constructed from thousands of repurposed boards taken from old homes, a basketball court, as well as remnants from the construction site of the Nishi building itself. Although it looks somewhat chaotic, every single board and suspension rod was designed and placed before construction began. You can see much more at the Hotel Hotel Blog. (via Jeroen Apers, Hotel Hotel Blog)






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Trompe L’oeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs 











Starting with layers of Finnish birch plywood artist Ron Isaacs builds elaborately designed constructions onto which he paints, in a trompe l’oeil fashion, the delicate details of leaves sprouting from clothing or the textured surface of twigs and bark. Each piece merges three recurring subjects found in most of his works: vintage clothing, plant materials, and found objects. Isaacs shares via his artist statement:

My three primary recurring subjects are vintage clothing (for the way it continues the life of the past into the present, for its rich structures and colors and shapes, and for its anthropomorphic presence as a stand-in for the figure); plant materials in the form of sticks, leaves, and flowers (for too many reasons to list); and found objects. They combine in appropriate or surprising juxtapositions, sometimes purely as a visual “poem” of sorts and (if I’m lucky) sometimes as an image with real psychological resonance. Objects occasionally reappear in other contexts and take on new meanings, like a repertory company of actors playing different roles in different plays.

Isaacs will have several new pieces on view at Snyderman-Works Gallery in Philadelphia starting May 2, 2014. You can also see more of his work over at Tory Folliard Gallery. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Unusual Sculptures of People and Skeletons Chiseled from Wood by Yoshitoshi Kanemaki 








Japanese sculptor Yoshitoshi Kanemaki chisels these life-sized figurative sculptures out of giant pieces of camphor wood, a kind of evergreen. The strange pieces frequently involve two or more characters merged into a single form, which could been interpreted as commentary on mortality, or multiple personalities/perspectives. You can see much more over on Fuma Contemporary, Art Emporer and Elsa Art Gallery. (via Empty Kingdom, Juxtapoz,

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Colourblind: A Wooden Stop-Motion Short for Elliot the Bull 



Colourblind is the latest stop-motion short from Australian animation firm Oh Yeah Wow (previously here and here). While the animators have previously worked with light, textiles, clay and other materials, this piece was constructed from geometric wood pieces to tell the story of two beautifully imagined characters. The video was created for alternative rock band Elliot the Bull’s latest single by the same title, Colourblind.

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A Hand-Cranked Automaton That Mimics the Effect of a Raindrop Hitting Water 



This little wood automaton is meant to mimic the effect of a water drop hitting a body of water, all using concentric rings cut from wood that are manipulated by a hand crank. The piece was created by UK-based designer Dean O’Callaghan, inspired by the work of Reuben Margolin (most likely his round wave sculpture). (via The Automata Blog)

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The Wild Adventures of Joe Iurato’s Tiny Wooden Figures 









Inspired by various stages of his life, from skateboarding to breakdancing and rock climbing to the experiences of fatherhood, New Jersey-based artist Joe Iurato creates tiny wooden figures and sets them loose in public places. The daring little people dangle from bridges, swing from street signs, and often create their own “art” in the form of painted slogans left of sidewalks and curbs. Iurato discusses his work in this 2013 interview with Brooklyn Street Art:

The pieces I’ve been making are small, spray painted wood cutouts. No bigger than 15” in size. The subjects vary, but they’re all very personal – they sort of tell the story of my life in stages. From break dancing to skateboarding to rock climbing to becoming a father, all of these things have helped define my character. For me, it’s just about revisiting those moments in a way that’s familiar. I’ve always appreciated seeing architecture and nature in a different light. As a skater, the tar banks behind a local supermarket, a flight of stairs, a parking block, a drainage ditch, a handrail, a wall – they all present possibilities for interaction and fun in ways they weren’t intended to be used.

Iurato frequently leaves the artworks to be discovered by the community, where depending on their location, they may only last a few days or even hours. The artist will have work at R.Jampol Projects starting March 9th, 2014 and you can follow him on Flickr and over on Facebook. (via Junk Culture, Visual News)

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