wood

Posts tagged
with wood



Art

Domestic Sculptures Formed With Wood Grown at the United States and Mexico Border by Hugh Hayden

September 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"America" (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Texas-born sculptor Hugh Hayden (previously) combines different varieties of wood to create furniture and other domestic objects with protruding spikes and branches. For his latest exhibition Border States at Lisson Gallery in New York City, Hayden addresses notions of citizenship and boundaries with sculptures made using wood indigenous to the United States and Mexico border. The traditional family ideals of the American Dream are evoked in objects such as a dining room table, picket fence, and child’s stroller, yet their source material speaks to the contentious practices upheld at our nation’s border.

Eastern Red Cedar, a wood from Texas with a pinkish interior, composes 
The Jones Part 3, a fence covered in branches which reach out at the audience from its vertical slats. “Texas Ebony,” a dark wood that grows at the border, composes another sculpture, while the weed-like Mesquite forms a kitchen table and chairs titled America.

Hayden currently lives and works in New York City. Border States runs at Lisson Gallery through October 27, 2018. You can see more of his politically-minded sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"America" (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"Cable News" (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Cable News” (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.<span style="color: #444444; font-size: 1rem;"> </span>

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"
The Jones Part 3" (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“
The Jones Part 3” (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

"Untitled (Wagon)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (Wagon)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

"Untitled (French gothic picket)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (French gothic picket)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

 

 



Art Design

Sinuously Curved Benches Made with Thin Strips of Steam-Bent Hardwood

August 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based furniture designer and sculptor Matthias Pliessnig creates sumptuous, twisting benches by steam-bending hardwood. He first developed the process in 2006 while studying wooden boat building techniques at the University of Wisconsin-Madison when he realized that by flipping his boat-inspired creations over, he could use the hollow form as a sturdy bench. Once he has designed his works using Rhinoceros 3-D software, Pliessnig places a strips of wood into a tube filled with hot steam. After ten minutes the wood is malleable enough to bend into his desired shape, but only for about 30 seconds. In eight hours, the wood is fully hardened, and back to its original strength. You can see more of the designer’s undulating furniture on his Instagram.

Photo: Sam Amil

 

 



Art

Mischievous Wooden Trolls Take Over an Arboretum in Northern Illinois

August 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

This summer, Danish artist Thomas Dambo (previously) has brought his fun-loving and kid-friendly trolls to the Morton Arboretum near Chicago, Illinois. Six site-specific characters range from Joe the Guardian surveying the neighboring highway to Sneaky Socks Alexa hidden in a cluster of shrubs. Dambo constructed the large storybook creatures using reclaimed wood sourced from fallen trees and branches as well as retired pallets and packing crates. Each figure towers up to thirty feet tall, with reclining Little Artur stretching sixty feet long. The exhibition, titled Troll Hunt, marks the Copenhagen-based artist’s first large-scale show in the United States. You can see Dambo’s fantastical creations at the Arboretum through the end of 2018 (and possibly into 2019, weather-dependent). Follow along with his creations on Facebook.

 

 



Art

Masses of Wooden Chairs Pour From Old Villas by Karin van der Molen

July 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Flux" (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France, all images via Karin van der Molen

“Flux” (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France, all images via Karin van der Molen

Site-specific installation artist Karin van der Molen creates connections between the natural and man-made through chair-based works that flow from the windows of aging villas. In her 2015 piece Flux the Dutch artist created one of her installations at the Le Rayolet in the botanical garden Domaine du Rayol. The wooden chairs meld into a stream of organized logs that connect the work to the surrounding gardens. The piece seems to go from solid to fluid, forming a bridge that she explains “makes us aware of the cross-over between culture and nature.” Molen produces a similar effect in A Wave of Nostalgia which she installed at the Museum Lolland-Falster in Pederstrup, Denmark in 2014. You can view a wider range of her installations on her website. (via WOMENSART)

"Flux" (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

“Flux” (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

"Flux" (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

“Flux” (2015), Domaine du Rayol, Rayol du Canadel, France

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

"A Wave of Nostalgia" (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

“A Wave of Nostalgia” (2014), Museum Lolland-Falster, Pederstrup, Denmark

 

 

 



Design

Engraved Wood and Resin Tables Glow With Maps of International Cities

July 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Warsaw-based company Woo Design engraves aerial views of major international cities like New York, Paris, London, and Munich into wooden coffee tables left raw or filled with resin. The designs are built with three layers to give a complete view of each city, with specific segments that reveal its streets, building tops, and waterways. In several of the company’s designs the resin embedded in the table glows a bright blue or green, adding a luminous element to the table’s surface. Woo Design’s tables are currently available through their website and Etsy. You can follow along for more updated cities and designs on their Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

  

 

 



Art Craft

New Miniature Lace Scenes by Ágnes Herczeg Capture Quiet Domestic Moments

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Hungarian fiber artist Ágnes Herczeg (previously) continues to create delicate depictions of quiet moments. Formed from colorful lace and found wood, each small scene floats in mid-air and is attached to a piece of wood. Whereas in previous work, Herczeg used unusually shaped wood fragments as part of the figural elements of the scenes, in her more recent pieces the wood acts as a frame. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Gnarled Eyes and Knotted Ears Emerge from Sculptural Portraits Made With Found Wood

June 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Bennett Ewing travels the world collecting pieces of wood from mountains, deserts, beaches, and forests to form expressive sculptural portraits. Using the natural shapes and tones of his found wooden materials, Ewing, who goes by the artist name Eyevan Tumbleweed, builds evocative facial features and wild hairstyles. The artist states, “the sylvan entities and their expressions of thought and emotion portray a glimpse of an otherworldly realm that is not altogether unfamiliar.” You can see more of Ewing’s artwork on his website and Instagram. (via Supersonic Art)