wood

Posts tagged
with wood



Art

Glass Beaded Sculptures by Valérie Rey Bring a Luminous New Dimension to Discarded Wood

June 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Gelée Royale" (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

“Gelée Royale” (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

Costa Rica-based artist Valérie Rey combines fallen segments of branches and logs with glass beads to bring a luminous new life to found natural forms. Innumerable glass baubles in colors of orange, gold, green, and black either completely encrust the found material or are sprinkled over its exterior, imitating a natural appearance similar to a cracked geode. ​You can see more of her nature-inspired sculptures on her website and Instagram.

Detail of "Gelée Royale" (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

Detail of “Gelée Royale” (2017), Wood and glass, 16 x 11 x 15 inches

"Effervescence" (2016), Wood and glass, 14 x 12 x 9 inches

“Effervescence” (2016), Wood and glass, 14 x 12 x 9 inches

Cervelle de Moineau (2017), Glass, 13 x 7 x 7 inches

“Supernova”

“In The Sky With Diamonds” (2017), Wood and glass, 6 x 6 x 14 inches

“Après la Pluie”

Detail of “Après la Pluie”

“Angel Virus” (2015), Wood and glass, : 18 x 9 x 9 inches

"Black Rainbow" (2017), Wood and glass, 8 x 8 x 5 inches

“Black Rainbow” (2017), Wood and glass, 8 x 8 x 5 inches

“E2” (2017), Wood and glass, 7 x 7 x 7 inches

 

 



Art

A Towering Wooden Sculpture by Daniel Popper Welcomes Beachgoers in Tulum

June 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

South African artist Daniel Popper, known for his massive figurative sculptures, has constructed a new artwork as part of an arts and culture festival in Tulum, Mexico. The towering installation is titled Ven a la Luz (come into the light), and is comprised of wood and rope formed into a female figure. Her torso is filled with lush green plants, which creates an archway for viewers to walk through.

Ven a La luz will be permanently installed at the resort Ahau Tulum now that the inaugural festival, Art With Me, has concluded. As Tulum’s popularity for vacationing has exploded over the last several years, development and cultural investment has dramatically increased in the area. Recently, a member of the famed Guggenheim family built an art gallery using a similar rustic, curvilinear style to Popper’s festival-friendly sculpture. You can see more of Popper’s large-scale sculptures on his website and Instagram. (via Street Art News)

 

 



Art

Impractical Wooden Furniture Created to Blend Into its Natural Environment

May 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

Hugh Hayden builds furniture not intended for human use, crafting benches and chairs from pieces of wood without removing the original branches or twigs. In these sculptural works the stray forms make it nearly impossible to use the object as a piece of furniture. The shape an Adirondack chair is present, like in his piece The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas, yet its impediments make sitting an uncomfortable challenge.

Hayden’s imbedded branches serve as a camouflage system that explores how his designed objects might blend into a natural landscape. His piece “Brier Patch,” which features six carved school desks, “juxtaposes the organic, unpredictability of the natural world (e.g. undergrowth,
a thicket etc.) with the ordered and disciplined pursuit of education and greater civilization,” he explains. “The branches extending from the desks are entangled and materialize this integration into the landscape or environment, creating a visible, unifying space, that is at once protective and impenetrable.”

His solo exhibition at White Columns runs through June 2, 2018, and is his first in New York City. Hayden recently received is MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University, and his Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University in 2007. You can see more of his sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

"Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

“Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

"Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

“Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

"The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas" (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

“The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas” (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

"Untitled Lexus Dash" (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

“Untitled Lexus Dash” (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

 

 



Art

A Skeletal Wooden Kraken Climbs From Remote Ruins in France

May 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French artist Thomas Voillaume, a.k.a. APACH, likes to mix his background in sculpture and video to 3D map digital works onto larger-than-life public sculptures in urban environments. For his 2016 sculpture The Kraken however, the artist decided to construct the work with a more minimal approach. The piece is an open wooden structure built into the ruins of Val d’Escrein, a remote valley in Hautes-Alpes, France. Its body is situated at the center of the stone building, while its six pointed legs reach over the crumbling walls.

Voillaume’s work is one of three monumental installations scattered throughout the region, including eleven illuminated dandelion sculptures formed from clusters of milk bottles by Alice and David Bertizzolo and a giant wooden hand by Pedro Marzorati. You can take a look at more of Voillaume’s work on his website and Instagram, and view a behind-the-scenes video of The Kraken’s construction (with horses!) in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Design

The Quirky Wooden Automata of Kazuaki Harada

February 28, 2018

Christopher Jobson

With the push of a button or the crank of a handle, these whimsical wooden automata by Japanese woodworker Kazuaki Harada spring to life, with figures that bounce and dance across a miniature stage like puppets. Harada is a prolific designer of mechanical designs fashioned from wood both large and small, from tiny single-crank pieces to giant labyrinthine playscapes in galleries and museums. The delight in many of his automata is derived from their simplicity, but lately he’s explored increasingly elaborate devices like a dot matrix printer and longer sequences akin to a Rube Goldberg machine.

Harada shares his latest work on Instagram and you can watch nearly a decade of his completed pieces on his YouTube channel. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Monumental Aged Wood Constructions by Leonardo Drew

December 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Leonardo Drew is an artist known for his large wall-mounted sculptures composed of jagged tree trunks layered with thousands of segments of cut wood. The monumental installations perform as abstracted landscapes, which undulate and retract through a combination of natural and man-made shapes.

Although typically monochromatic, the works vary in color depending on how extensively Drew chooses to alter the material’s exterior. In some works the wood is stark black, while in others the light wood appears relatively untreated.

“By manipulating the wood and other objects to weather and age them, Drew’s awe-inspiring sculptures reveal the artist’s intense attention to shaping, cutting, building, and working his pieces through his own material language,” explains a press release for Drew’s eponymous solo exhibition at Talley Dunn Gallery this past fall. “These densely stacked and layered sculptures activate the spaces in which they occupy with a dynamic presence whereby complexity and simplicity coexist.”

Drew’s work has been exhibited in numerous solo exhibitions, including The Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin, Ireland, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Miami Art Museum, and the St. Louis Art Museum. He has also collaborated with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, and has participated in artist residencies at ArtPace, San Antonio and The Studio Museum of Harlem in New York City.

Recently Drew produced an installation for San Francisco’s de Young Museum titled Number 197, a work which responded to the institution’s unique architecture by spanning three walls of its atrium. This fall he also exhibited at Talley Dunn Gallery in Dallas, Texas where his solo exhibition Leonardo Drew was on view through December 16.

 

 



Art Craft

Glass Vases Formed Within Wooden Enclosures by Scott Slagerman Studio

November 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

To explore the symbiotic relationship between two vastly different materials, LA-based artist Scott Slagerman in a collaboration with Jim Fishman created this elegant Wood & Glass series. Each glass vase is formed by blowing it directly into a shape cut from wood while it lays flat on a table, ensuring the disparate objects fit perfectly like puzzle pieces. For a labor-intensive process that requires a precise dance of speed and movement, the added difficulty of working with a flammable enclosure seems remarkable. From Slagerman’s artist statement:

Scott Slagerman has always been captivated by glass – how it is transformed from a fragile, yet unyielding solid state to molten fluidity and back again; and how this mutable substance, through a process that is both delicate and dangerous, can create objects both essential and esoteric. He is fascinated by the role that glass plays in architecture, as well as in the everyday objects that we find around us.

You can see more from the Glass & Wood series on Slagerman’s website. (via Contemporist)