Craft

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Art Craft

From Junk Drawers to Phone Books, Artist Bernie Kaminski Captures the Nostalgia of Banal Items Through Papier-Mâché

January 13, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a paper mache junk drawer

All images © Bernie Kaminski, courtesy of Turn Gallery, shared with permission

A stack of worn phone books, a neatly folded button-up, and a junk drawer filled with receipts, batteries, and takeout remnants capture the playful nostalgia of Bernie Kaminski’s papier-mâché sculptures. The artist, who began working with the humble craft after his daughter brought home a seahorse she made in school, is driven largely by curiosity and a desire to explore the potential of the material, and he tends to recreate the objects he finds around his home. An orange dutch oven sits atop a shelving unit stocked with pantry items and cookbooks, for example, and books like Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White and John Berger’s A Painter of Our Time find their place among other classic texts.

Kaminski gravitates toward authentic interpretations of generally banal items, although the subtle ripples and creases of the material remain visible. He generally coats a cardboard and tape base with the wet papier-mâché, before letting it dry and painting on logos, signatures, and other details. Imbued with a playful sense of nostalgia, the sculptures “look fake in a way that somehow reflects how I feel about the real thing,” the artist tells It’s Nice That.

Be sure to visit Kaminski’s Instagram for an archive of the lighthearted wares. (via Kottke)

 

A photo of paper mache phone books and a phone

A photo of a paper mache boombox

A photo of a paper mache t-shirt

A photo of a paper mache pantry

A photo of paper mache books

A photo of a paper mache button up

A detail photo of a paper mache junk drawer

 

 

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Art Craft Design

Precise Details and Architectural Contrasts Highlight Layla May Arthur’s Narrative Paper Sculptures

January 13, 2023

Kate Mothes

An architectural sculpture made of paper.

“Where We All Meet” (2022), paper sculpture, 1 x 1 x 1 meter. All images © Layla May Arthur, shared with permission

Wielding the fundamentals of set design, Layla May Arthur assembles elaborate architectural spaces and visual narratives from paper. The Netherlands-based artist focuses on the interplay between light and shadow in intricate, three-dimensional dioramas that emphasize storytelling in window displays, brand identities, and gallery presentations. In pieces ranging from delicate, individual sculptures of staircases to large-scale, immersive installations, she instills a sense that the viewer is a part of the interactions of figures within each scene.

Since graduating from university in 2021, Arthur has focused on projects that emulate the visual drama of theatrical presentations, setting the stage for products in boutique windows and brand collaborations in addition to museum exhibitions. “I really enjoy being able to handcraft artworks to be used in photoshoots or installations where my work reaches an audience who might not ordinarily seek out art in an art space,” she tells Colossal. “I have had incredible clients so far who have given me huge creative freedom in acting as both art director and artist.”

Arthur emphasizes each incision, angle, and pattern of the meticulously cut pieces of white paper by spotlighting or illuminating from within. “I love being able to create an artistic experience which is part of the everyday and highlights the possibilities of craftsmanship,” she says.

Find more of Arthur’s work on her website, Behance, and Instagram, where she often shares videos of her process.

 

An architectural sculpture made of paper, illuminated from within.

“THE STORYTELLER, THE LISTENER, AND OUR STORY” (2021), paper and light Installation

An architectural sculpture made of paper.

“Where We All Meet” (2022)

Two images of an architectural sculpture made of paper.

Details of “Where We All Meet” (2022)

An architectural sculpture made of paper.

“Shop Window Set Design for Mary Jane Schoenenboetiek” (2021), paper sculpture

Two images of an architectural sculpture made of paper, illuminated from within.

Details of “THE STORYTELLER, THE LISTENER, AND OUR STORY” (2021)

A detail of an architectural sculpture made of paper, illuminated from within.

Detail of “THE STORYTELLER, THE LISTENER, AND OUR STORY” (2021)

A detail of an architectural sculpture made of paper, illuminated from within.

Detail of “THE STORYTELLER, THE LISTENER, AND OUR STORY” (2021)

n architectural sculpture made of paper, illuminated from within. Pictured with two people peering up at it.

Detail of “THE STORYTELLER, THE LISTENER, AND OUR STORY” (2021)

An architectural sculpture of a staircase made of paper, photographed on a teal paisley background.

“Forgotten Places – Remembered“ (2022), paper sculptures, 20 x 20 centimeters

A detail of an architectural sculpture made of paper.

Detail of “Shop Window Set Design for Mary Jane Schoenenboetiek” (2021), paper sculpture

A large-scale papercut artwork featuring a narrative of Jersey.

“Jersey; My Childhood Home” (2019), paper cutting, circumference 754 centimeters x 200 centimeters

The panels of a large-scale papercut artwork featuring a narrative of Jersey.

Panels from “Jersey; My Childhood Home”

An installation view of a large-scale papercut artwork featuring a narrative of Jersey.

Installation view of “Jersey; My Childhood Home”

 

 



Craft Design

Freewheeling Hares and Bespectacled Kangaroos Hop Into Hugo Horita’s Playful Wooden Menagerie

January 12, 2023

Kate Mothes

A detail of a wooden sculpture carved to look like a sheep with a crocheted sweater on.

All images © Hugo Horita, shared with permission

Although they are carved from timber, the personalities in Hugo Horita’s growing menagerie are far from wooden. An adventurous camel, a sheep in a sweater, and a deer that’s quick on the draw are just a few of the characters the Buenos Aires-based artist has introduced. “I like to bring ideas and shapes to a three-dimensional language, and I chose wood because it is a very noble and warm material,” he tells Colossal.

Trained as an illustrator, Horita’s work often rests squarely in the digital realm, and he sought a creative outlet that involved using his hands. While some ideas can lead to a new piece in just a few days, sometimes the process takes months, beginning with a sketch on paper or a virtual vector image. He then carves the toy-like sculptures with an emphasis on the details of the grain to accentuate joints and muscles and often incorporates other found elements like pencils. Preferring to use scrap pieces that others have thrown away, which allows for various tones and textures, Horita completes each animal with the cartoonish addition of wheels, spectacles, or skis.

Find more of the spirited critters on Behance and Instagram.

 

A wooden sculpture of a deer with pencils for antlers.

Wooden sculptures of a sheep and a camel. The sheep has a crocheted sweater on, and the camel has mountains for humps and is wearing skis.

Sheep sweater made in collaboration with cAlma mía

Two wooden sculptures of leaping hares.

A wooden sculpture of a joey in its mother's pouch, and both animals are wearing white glasses.

A wooden sculpture of a rocking horse with two horses facing each other on the same rocker.

A wooden sculpture of a moose with a pick comb for antlers.

A detail of a wooden sculpture of a moose.

A wooden sculpture of hare holding wheels.

A wooden sculpture of a sloth laying upside-down in a chair.

A detail of a wooden sculpture of a sloth laying upside-down in a chair.

A wooden sculpture of a deer with antlers made of pencils.

 

 



Craft Food

Crocheted Toasts, Ramen, and Turkey Dinners Are Prepared with Rich Fibers by Maria Skog

January 11, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of crocheted toasts

All images © Maria Skog, shared with permission

Maria Skog guarantees her orange slices, turkey, and eggs won’t spoil. She crochets fiber-based creations with preservation in mind, ensuring that every berry and bagel stays as fresh as the day they were made.

Based in  Närpes, Finland, Skog began crafting the fare for her two daughters about 12 years ago when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. The practice was meditative and calming. “If I wouldn’t survive, I wanted the girls to have living memories of me, and I thought that they would remember us playing together with the food I crocheted myself,” she says.

Skog sells her toasts and other treats, along with patterns for each piece, which you can find more about on Instagram.

 

A photo of crocheted produce

A photo of a crocheted turkey

A photo of crocheted berries

Four photos of crocheted food

A photo of a crocheted bagel with lox

A photo of crocheted bagels

 

 



Craft Design

Mila Textiles Reimagines the Balaclava in Vibrant Beadwork and Embroidered Visages

January 3, 2023

Kate Mothes

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

All images © Mila Textiles, shared with permission

Masks have long been associated with myriad cultural functions from ceremonial rites and dramatic performances to defense and protection from disease or inclement weather. For London-based designer Kamila, who works under the name Mila Textiles, ski masks—also known as balaclavas—provide a fitting canvas for elaborately embroidered, wearable compositions.

A 19th century military staple, balaclavas saw a sartorial rise in 2021. The practical knitwear item takes its name from the Ukrainian port town of Balaclava, a key battle site during the Crimean War of 1854, and in the 20th century, the garment became a trope in movies and television depicting burglaries and heists. Kamila’s colorful reinterpretation of the mask relaxes these associations. “I want my work to make my audience feel happy, forget about their stresses for a bit, and chill,” she tells Colossal.

Kamila draws inspiration from her local environment, sharing that “living in London means I am constantly surrounded by events, museums, and galleries where I can take pictures of anything that gives me creative ideas.” The vibrant hues and textures of coral and marine life are another influence, especially in the context of cartoons. “I try to include creatures in my designs because this brings comfort to me, almost as cartoons would,” she says. Bright colors are paired with beads and layers of thread to produce playful patterns around the wearer’s eyes.

In addition to balaclavas, Mila Textiles produces meticulously embellished bags and pouches featuring faux fur and patterned fabrics. New items are listed in the shop on her website, and you can follow more of her work on Instagram.

 

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

Two photos of an individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

A detail of beadwork and embroidery.

 

 



Craft

A Centuries-Old Decorative Tradition Inspires Michelle Robinson’s Vibrant Weavings

December 27, 2022

Kate Mothes

A photograph of a brightly colored woven wall hanging laid out on a surface.

All images © Michelle Robinson, shared with permission

“Colour is my first passion,” says Sydney-based artist Michelle Robinson, who weaves textured fibers in vibrant hues into lively wall-hangings and accessories. The artist draws on more than twenty years of experience in the soft furnishings and upholstery industry, which instilled a deep appreciation for textiles. She began working with the medium as a way to further explore her love for decor and shares that the process “allows me to continuously play with all the colour combinations that wizz through my brain—and hopefully pass on some of the energy to others that colour can evoke.”

After weaving for four years, Robinson signed up for a masterclass in passementerie, the 16th and 17th century European decorative artderived from passement, an archaic French word for “lace”—that centers on ornate trimmings like edging and tassels for clothing and furniture. Led by U.K.-based artist Elizabeth Ashdown, the class was an opportunity to learn traditional methods from a practitioner who is committed to keeping the craft alive. Robinson shares that she “was immediately besotted with the possibilities for this historic and beautiful technique and was reminded of all the beautiful braids I worked with in my decorating days.” Her pieces reference the ornamental plaits and trims of furniture and garments.

Robinson creates wall hangings and accessories like bookmarks on frame looms, employing traditional techniques to produce geometric works that have a contemporary feel. Recently, she has been exploring how to scale up the medium, examining how the different threads behave within the structure and retain a sense of nostalgia and playfulness. She explains:

I find myself constantly experimenting and learning new techniques, using primarily all-natural fibres. I also love adding repurposed items like knitting needles and re-spun fibres and finishing weavings with hand sewn details. It’s the details that draw you into an artwork that appeal to me.

Robinson often makes pieces available for sale on Etsy, and you can find more of her work on Instagram.

 

A photograph of a brightly colored woven wall hanging.

A photograph of brightly colored woven wall hangings laid out on a surface.

A photograph of a brightly colored woven wall hanging laid out on a surface.

A photograph of brightly colored woven wall hangings laid out on a surface.

A photograph of brightly colored woven wall hangings laid out on a surface next to balls of fiber.  A photograph of a detail of a brightly colored woven wall hanging laid out on a surface.

A photograph of a corner of a brightly colored woven wall hanging laid out on a surface.

 

 

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