Craft

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Art Craft

Found Vintage Photographs are Reinterpreted with Colorful Overlays by Julie Cockburn

October 3, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“The Ecologist” (2019), hand embroidery and inkjet on found photograph. All images © Julie Cockburn, courtesy of Flowers Gallery

Working with vintage photographs, artist Julie Cockburn (previously) re-energizes images that have been lost to time with colorful overlays. Cockburn adds tightly stitched orbs, swirling marbled enamel, and architectural structures as overlays to black-and-white or softly toned studio portraits, candid snaps, and landscape photos.

The London-based artist’s current solo exhibition, ‘Telling It Slant’, is on view through November 2, 2019 at Flowers Gallery‘s Kingsland Road location. Cockburn’s show title alludes to an Emily Dickinson poem called Tell all the Truth but Tell it Slant. In a statement, the gallery describes the artist’s work as “excavat[ing] authentic stories by circuitous means… Cockburn embarks on a visual journey to delicately reveal narrative histories and layered meanings in lost and discarded images. Cockburn partially obscures the images in a process she describes as ‘paradoxically unmasking’ their intrinsic truths.”

See more of the artist’s work on Instagram, and place an order for Cockburn’s first monograph, Stickybeak, published by Chose Commune.

“Moonscape” (2019), hand embroidery on found photograph

“Qualm” (2019), hand embroidery and inkjet on found photograph

“Plumage 1” (2019), hand embroidery on found postcard

“Blue Face Man” (2019), enamel on found photograph

L: “Armour” 2019, hand embroidery and ink on found photograph / R: “The Welder” (2019), hand embroidery on found photograph

“Feed the Birds Man” (2019), C type print of found photograph and glass beads

“Will O The Wisp” (2019), hand embroidery on found photograph

 

 



Art Craft

Hundreds of Ceramic Circles are Linked Together in Movable Sculptures by Cecil Kemperink

September 25, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Ceramic artist Cecil Kemperink creates delicate chain sheets using hundreds of interconnected ceramic loops. The chains are then draped in piles, forming malleable sculptures that are simultaneously hulking and fragile. Kemperink generally uses a minimal color palette, highlighting the natural tone of the clay while using subtle ombrés to accentuate the multiple parts within each finished work. With a multi-faceted background in dance and fashion, “her sculptures show the connection between her various passions. She investigates ‘space’ and plays with rhythm, form, movement, energy and sound,” according to a statement on Kemperink’s website. The Dutch artist’s most recent solo exhibition, which closes on September 29, 2019, is at Musea della Ceramica in Mondovi, Italy. See more of Kemperink’s work on her website and Instagram, where she often shares videos of in-progress work and records the transfixing sounds of her sculptures in motion.

 

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Art Craft

Knitted Camouflage’s Models Blend into the Background in a New Art Book

September 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Last year, we shared Joseph Ford and Nina Dodd’s collaborative project that featured people sporting custom-knit ensembles that perfectly melded with their environment. Since then, the photographer and knitter duo have been hard at work creating new pairings that disguise watermelons as bananas, farmers as their cows, and commuters as the escalators they ascend. Invisible Jumpers, their book published by Hoxton Mini Press, documents the Knitted Camouflage project’s best work. See more from the series on Ford’s website and Instagram and pick up a book from Hoxton (currently shipping internationally) or place a pre-order for U.S. delivery on Amazon.

 

 



Art Craft Design

Sequined and Baubled Masks by ‘Damselfrau’ Fascinate with Mysterious Beauty

September 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Self-taught artist Magnhild Kennedy (previously), who works as ‘Damselfrau’, uses found and vintage materials to create elaborate masks. Mesh netting, sequined appliques, ribbons, beads, and pompoms come together in Kennedy’s wearable artworks, which she documents and shares on Instagram. Leaving space for her eyes, the artist otherwise completely obscures her face and poses against a blank background with patterned fabric draped around her shoulders. The artist declines to attach specific meaning or intention to each creation, instead leaving the interpretive experience up to the viewer.

In an interview with Yatzer, Kennedy explains that she grew up in an artistic household, and describes her start as a mask-maker as “a fluke”: in the 2000’s she began making masks as a fun thing to wear when going out to clubs with friends. Over the last decade, Kennedy has continued to explore the seemingly limitless possibilities of the mask as medium, and teaches herself new sewing skills to add to her repertoire of techniques. The artist explains to Yatzer that she draws inspiration from domestic environments: “I’m inspired by people’s homes and how they live with their objects around them. I often feel like I’m decorating a space, more than making a mask.”

You can see more of the artist’s ever-expanding collection of masks on Instagram and view select editorial commissions on her website gallery.

 

 



Craft Design Music

A New Modular Paper Organ Allows Users to Build and Tune Their Own Functional Musical Instruments

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Wolfram Kampffmeyer (previously) loves to play with paper. The German artist uses the seemingly simple material to create three-dimensional shapes and figures, often designing products that users can assemble themselves. His newest project, PAPERorgan, is a fully functioning modular organ that is fueled by an inflated balloon. The instrument can run for approximately 40 seconds on one balloon’s-worth of air, and plays a range of notes depending on how each user chooses to tune and expand their organ. For paper organ aficionados, Kampffmeyer clarifies that he has spoken with fellow instrument designer Aliaksei Zholner (previously) to ensure that his design and commercial product are not derivative or competitive.

Kampffmeyer is currently building awareness for the product and will be funding production on Kickstarter. Follow along with the journey on Instagram and Facebook, and sign up for email updates on PAPERorgan’s website.

 

 

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Art Craft

Lush Botanical Forms Translated Into Abstract Embroideries by Helen Wilde

August 28, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

U.K.-based embroidery artist Helen Wilde interprets oceanic landscapes in her three-dimensional hoop embroideries. Using tightly edited color palettes, often featuring teals and natural tones, Wilde layers stitches, knots, twists, and pom-poms. The organic shapes resemble commingled forms of plant life, and are built upon organza or hand-woven fabrics. Wilde’s most recent work was inspired by the tropical modernism of Sri Lanka. You can see more of her botanical embroidery on Instagram and purchase original works in her Etsy store. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Craft

Driftwood Animals and Beach Homes by Kirsty Elson Give New Life to Elements From the Sea

August 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Multi-media artist Kirsty Elson uses the bits of driftwood, shells, and other seaside scraps in her home in Cornwall, England to produce unique sculptures that imitate the surrounding seaside homes. Elson recreates the quaint cottages with minimal paint, utilizing bottle caps for lighthouse roofs, rusted nails for chimneys, and metal washers for decorative lifesavers. “The great thing about driftwood is that each piece is very different,” she explains in an interview with Studio Wallop on her website. “I tend to let the materials lead me, rather than having an idea in my head and trying to find a piece to fit my idea… I let the materials do the work really.” The artist studied illustration and printmaking at the Cambridge School of Art. You can see more of her reclaimed sculptures on Instagram. (via #WOMENSART)