Craft

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Craft

Intricate Tessellations Expand and Contract in New Folded Paper Works by Ekaterina Lukasheva

April 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

San Francisco-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva (previously) makes dazzling tessellations seem like child’s play, effortlessly folding complex designs from matte and iridescent paper. The beautiful works have a double presentation, as they each work as expanded and contracted forms. Lukasheva has published several books on her DIY paper works, including her most recent Floral Origami: From Begin er to Advanced: 30 Delicious Origami Flowers and Balls for Home Decoration.  You can see more of her folded paper masterpieces in motion on Instagram.

 

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Art Craft

New Three Dimensional Narratives Composed from Discarded Books

April 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

UK-based book sculptor Emma Taylor sources old books from charity and antique shops and gives them a second story. Taylor uses simple materials—just glue, paper, and scissors—to sculpt architectural facades, lively animals, and leafy trees from otherwise unused titles. Each scene is inspired by the book’s written content, with a garden scene emerging from An Introduction to Botany and Italian houses built out of The Story of Venice. The artist shares on her website that she has been carving and sculpting books for several years, and has exhibited her creations in Cambridge, London, and Hong Kong. Taylor has recently opened an Etsy shop stocked with a few of her paper-based artworks, and shares updates on new works on Twitter. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Craft Design

Elaborate Historical Wigs Formed From Copper Wire by Bespoke Sculptor Yasemen Hussein

April 8, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Mixed media bespoke sculptor Yasemen Hussein explains that her art career was originally pointed in the direction of glass, but she found her passion for metalwork while working toward an MFA at Illinois State University. Now well established in her metal practice, Hussein uses copper electrical cable to form elaborate and sinuously lifelike hairdos. The video below, from London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, takes a look inside Hussein’s studio as she created wigs used by the V&A for their exhibit Opera: Passion, Power and Politics.

Hussein works in a coverted stable house in south London, where she manipulates the thin metal cables to simulate elaborate styles ranging from carefully coiled curls to the sweeping fan-like shapes of a geisha’s coif. Rather than creating exact replicas of realistic hair in every wig, Hussein incorporates artistic license to suggest the volume and gesture of each historical look.

In addition to her dramatic wigs, Hussein also creates geometric sculptural installations and delicate copper feathers. You can explore more of the sculptor’s work on her website.

 

 



Craft

Antique Lace and Handkerchiefs Add Detail to Embroideries of Female Icons by Lily Bloomwood

April 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Portrait of Dorothy Gish

Self-taught artist Lily Bloomwood utilizes bits of antique lace, handkerchiefs, and delicate pieces of old knitting as the starting point for her embroidered portraits of female figures. Many of the works are inspired by women of the silent movie era such as the Canadian born actress and producer Mary Pickford or Olive Thomas, who is regarded as the very first “flapper.” Bloomwood is also inspired by relatively unknown medieval heroines, women she chooses to immortalize in her embroidered canvases. You can see more of the London-based artist’s work on Behance, and buy her work on Etsy. (via Colossal Submissions)

Portrait of Maude Fealy

Portrait of Maude Fealy

Portrait of Maude Fealy

Portrait of Maude Fealy

Portrait of Mary Pickford

Portrait of Mary Pickford

Portrait of Marion Davis

Portrait of Marion Davis

Portrait of Maude Adams

Portrait of Maude Adams

Portrait of Lillian Gish

Portrait of Lillian Gish

Portrait of Lillian Gish

Portrait of Lillian Gish

Portrait of Mary Pickford

Portrait of Mary Pickford

Portrait of Camilla Horn

Portrait of Camilla Horn

Portrait of Olive Thomas

Portrait of Olive Thomas

 

 



Craft Design

Playful Paper Masks by Lobulo Studio for Barcelona’s Grec Festival

April 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

For the 2018 marketing of Barcelona’s long-running Grec Festival, which includes dance, theater, circus, and music, the London-based Lobulo Studio was tapped to create a series of unusual paper masks. Using the prompt “new species,” Lobulo explains on their website that they were “playing with the concept of new rare species that nobody has seen before” in order to “bring color, joy, and readiness to discover”. Each mask conveys a unique persona: a four-eyed character’s mouth is open in awe, while drops of blue water-like shapes convey a fluid suit of armor. You can see more of Lobulo’s paper creations, including a Berlin feast and an eerie church, on Instagram and Behance. (via PLAIN Magazine)

 

 



Craft Design

A Topographic Table Presents a Sculptural Interpretation of Yosemite Valley in Blue, Yellow, and Gray

April 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Bang Bang Photography

Colorado-based company Beatnik Prints, owned by Christopher Warren, creates mountainous sculptures from multi-colored laser cut matte board. Segments are stacked and glued into dizzying forms that represent classic areas of the American west such as Devils Tower National Monument, Longs Peak, and Yosemite Valley. The latter is the subject of Warren’s latest work—a 3 x 4 x 2 foot wooden table with a tiny peephole that mimics “Tunnel View,” a popular outlook of the landmark from State Route 41. You can see more of Warren’s topographic designs including clothing, murals, and other two-dimensional works on the Beatnik Prints website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

All images by Bang Bang Photography

 

 



Craft Design

Subverted Consumer Goods Become Wearable New Apparel

April 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

During the weekday, Nicole McLaughlin works as a graphic designer at Reebok. But after hours her relationship to branded apparel and personal accessories takes a different creative turn. McLaughlin uses a wide variety of recognizable consumer goods to form totally new products. Often focusing on footwear, McLaughlin has formed slip-ons out of tennis balls and Levi’s waistband patches, and sandals from eBay packaging tape and IKEA bag handles. Additional creations range from an umbrella of The North Face puffy coats to foldable chairs comprised of athlete’s Gatorade bottles and foam sports fan hands.

The artist chops up and subverts the original functionality of these recognizable products and brands, but also is always careful to maintain—and often repeat—visible logos while she gives each item a new meaning and use. McLaughlin documents her creations in a closely cropped, plain manner that calls to mind images cataloged for an anthropological study. You can see more of her fashion interventions on Instagram, and keep an eye on her online store for functional pieces, all of which are currently sold out.