Art Craft

Embroidered Women Adorned With Flower-Shaped Tattoos and Leaf-Covered Clothing by Giselle Quinto

July 15, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Amsterdam-based artist Giselle Quinto embroiders the quiet moments that occur as one finds solitude. Quinto presents subjects left alone with just a potted plant or floral background. The works are created with precise black lines that outline a range of hairstyles, from short pixie cuts to a cascade of curls being held casually by a woman’s hand. Color tends to be used sparingly in her designs, often only used as an accent for plants, flowers, lips, and cheeks.

Quinto explains in her bio that her practice “brings an anarchic view to classic embroidery, revisiting old traditions and transforming it in protest for equality, where all have the right to be and live whoever they are.” You can buy your own piece of Quinto’s through her online shop and follow her photo shoots behind-the-scenes on Instagram. (via Brown Paper Bag)

 

 



Art

JR, Faith XLVII, and Two Dozen More Mural Artists Convene to Celebrate the Legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou

July 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Rabi of Cyrcle & JR’s Insideout Project, Los Angeles (2019). Photo: WISEKNAVE Fine Art Documentation

Muralists from around the world including JR, Faith XLVII, Axel Void, and Daniel Arsham came together for a weeklong Maya Angelou Mural Festival in Los Angeles celebrating the legendary poet. The artists, numbering more than two dozen, decorated the Dr. Maya Angelou Community High School with wall-scaling paintings that depicted or celebrated the visage and message of Dr. Angelou. Rabi and JR (previously) used Angelou’s “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings” in their design; Faith XLVII (previously) drew inspiration from the phoenix, a frequent motif in Angelou’s poetry. The mural festival was organized by Branded Arts. (via artnet)

Shawn Michael Warren’s mural (2019). Photo: staticmedium

HUGE’s mural. Photo: wiseknave (2019)

L: Daniel Arsham, Maya Angelou High School (2019). Photo: staticmedium / R: Victoria Cassinova’s mural (2019). Photo: staticmedium

Tochlita (2019). Photo: staticmedium

Axel void’s mural, (2019). Photo: Impermanent Art

Faith XLVII (2019). Photo: staticmedium

Perez Bros’ mural (2019). Photo: staticmedium

 

 



Learn New Skills and Strengthen Your Portfolio with Pratt Institute’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies

July 15, 2019

Colossal

Photo courtesy of Pratt SCPS

Each year, adult, high school, and college students advance their portfolio at Pratt, obtaining the necessary tools to stay ahead in today’s competitive workplace. Pratt Institute’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS) provides credit and non-credit courses to nontraditional students in a variety of subjects for educational advancement, career change, and enrichment.

Through Pratt’s innovative certificates — which include Exhibition Design, Fine Art, Photography and Video, Jewelry Design, and more — students not only propel forward in their desired field, but discover mindful techniques for engaging in their practice with an exploratory, boundary-pushing eye.

Pratt SCPS is dedicated to offering qualified programs and courses at the best value. Whether you are preparing for college or building a professional portfolio, SCPS is ready with resources, faculty, and academic advising to help you plan your program wisely.

Self-registration opens July 15. Courses are offered at Pratt Manhattan (144 West 14th Street), and on Pratt’s campus in the historic Clinton Hill section of Brooklyn.

For more information, visit www.pratt.edu/continuing-education-and-professional.

 

 



Art

The Vibrant Blue Hues of Morocco’s Chefchaouen Village Captured in Photographs by Tiago & Tania

July 14, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Photography duo Tania De Pascalis and Tiago Marques, known as Tiago & Tania, spent six days capturing the blue-tinted stone architecture of Chefchaouen, a 550-year-old village located in the mountains of Morocco. The photo series presents an interesting juxtaposition of everyday life within a fairytale-like aesthetic created by the town’s trademark cerulean walls, which have earned it the nickname “Blue Pearl.”

The lines and curves of the buildings and alleyways are visually augmented as the saturated blues contrast with the surrounding Earth tones, colorful textiles, and the people who move through the town. There are several theories about the history of the blue pigments used to color the walls of the Chefchaouen, which was founded as a refugee camp. According to Atlas Obscura, the refugees painted their homes blue according to Jewish traditions to mimic the sky and as a reminder of “God’s power above.”

Early on in the project, Tiago & Tania were met with some resistance from the town’s inhabitants, some of whom did not want their photos taken. “We experienced a unique challenge in Chechaouen, never encountered in any other location,” they told Colossal. “It was the contrast between our role as photographers and citizens… We decided to change our approach method, making nearly imperceptible our presence and focusing on the sense of hearing to [capture] the right moment. This method allowed us to connect to the hearth of the city, living his timings and moments, realizing the photographic series that gave life to the project of Chefchaouen.”

To see more of this and other series by Tiago & Tania, follow them on Instagram (here and here) and take yourself on a virtual journey around the world via their website.

 

 



Art

Gestural Brush Strokes and Focused Color Palettes Form Watercolor Portraits by Nick Runge

July 13, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Los Angeles-based artist Nick Runge paints watercolor portraits of people and human skeletons in a unique style that blends elements of abstraction with hints of realism. Soft edges of layered shapes and blended flesh and bone tones present all the visual information required to see features, without crossing into the realm of photorealism.

“I do sketch out the composition first, but I try not to have any kind of formula,” Runge tells Colossal about his painting process. “I try to narrow down the colors to ‘warm’ and ‘cool’ as a rough idea. I like to guide the watercolor but let it also do its own thing, to be more abstract.” Muted colors and expressive poses add to the naturalistic feel of the portraits, even when the subject is a jacket-wearing skeleton.

Raised in Colorado by now-retired professional artist parents (a college art professor and a graphic designer), Runge says that he did not study art formally but that he did benefit from having both of their perspectives. After working as an illustrator for 11 years, he found his voice in 2004 through experimentation. “Oil paint and watercolor allowed me to loosen up and step away from the highly realistic, pop type art (done mostly with acrylics and pencils) and let the paint do more of its own thing,” Runge explains, “Also, getting away from celebrity portraits and pop culture allowed me to focus more on HOW something is painted, and not WHAT/WHO I’m painting. Art for art’s sake.”

To see more of Nick Runge’s paintings, follow the artist on Instagram. He also has online and in-person watercolor workshops for those interesting in learning.

 

 



Photography

Nature Thrives in Tehran’s Abandoned Courtyards, Staircases, and Bedrooms in a Photo Series by Gohar Dashti

July 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Iranian photographer Gohar Dashti was born in Ahwaz during the early years of the Islamic Revolution and grew up during the Iran-Iraq war. Her personal memories of this time influenced her 2017 series Home, which looks at what happens after human displacement. In the photographs, large abandoned spaces are filled with plentiful plants, fleshing out the spaces with lush growth that highlights the absence of human life. “[The] people in Home moved out, and the images show what happens when one’s home is left behind,” she explains in her artist statement. “The photographs reveal the power of nature to consume and conquer a home.”

The sites Dashti choose to photograph around Tehran are not historical, but rather everyday spaces that residents were forced to leave due to social issues. During an interview with LensCulture she recalls visiting her hometown and finding a building that had belonged to her neighbors. “They had left during the war, and the house had fallen into disrepair. But, on their veranda, a fern remained,” she explained. “It had flourished in their absence, and its neck now curved against its own weight. It had the power to stay there. Left alone, it would eventually consume and conquer the home.”

Some scenes are staged to emphasize the power of nature’s unwavering return, while others are stumbled upon and shot as is. No matter what the location the images emphasize Dashti’s personal connections to the country and nature itself. “People are transient while nature is a constant,” she concludes in her artist statement, “it will be here long after we are all gone.” You can see more photographic series from the artist on her website and Instagram. (via LensCulture)

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Music

The Unsettling Timbre Produced by a 7-Foot-Wide Gong

July 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Paiste Gong Master Sven Meier demonstrates how to strike and a seven-foot-wide gong for maximum impact in a Youtube video by Wind Chimes Australia. After a few light taps to the middle of the instrument it bellows out with a dark and unsettling timbre that seems to resonate with doom. During the short demonstration Meier uses a few different techniques, extracting a range of sounds from the massive 80″ nickel silver gong. For more explorations into the sounds and vibrations produced by XXL gong check out these videos posted on Kottke.