Photography

Through Monochromatic Photographs, Aleksey Myakishev Documents Rural Life in Russia

January 21, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Aleksey Myakishev, shared with permission

Born in Kirov and now based in Moscow, photographer Aleksey Myakishev is adept at capturing the simple moments of life and transforming them into alluring black-and-white images. Taken mostly throughout Russia, his projects tend to focus on unassuming subjects as they navigate their daily lives. In one photograph, three figures walk over a snow-covered landscape away from a lit firework, and in another, Myakishev creates an uncanny juxtaposition between a hilly horizon and a man swinging a child by his hands as a winter boot flies from his foot. When describing the dozens of series he’s created, the prolific artist said capturing life in his native country can be complex.

It is always difficult to photograph the place where you live. Nevertheless, sometimes I pick up my camera and go to the streets to capture the city’s pulse. When I look through the camera’s viewfinder, a dialogue with the city takes place. There are lots of everything here, be it people, vehicles, buildings. Sometimes the city looks ugly to me, sometimes beautiful. Through photography I try to find something especial in this city, perceiving the underlying surrealism of what is going on.

Myakishev also has published three books chronicling his monochromatic works. To find more of his documentary-style images, head to his Instagram and keep an eye out for his upcoming project on provincial Russia.

Moscow (2019)

Davydovo (2013)

Arkhangelsk (2018)

 

 



Art Design

The Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Posters Feature a Wildly Diverse Blend of Artistic Styles

January 21, 2020

Grace Ebert

Lacking the traditional sport and tournament themes of previous years, the official posters for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games are taking a different approach to championing the celebrated contests. Organizers gathered work from Japanese and international artists with a range of styles and methods, from calligraphy to photography and manga to cubism, saying the posters are “regarded as the icons of their age.” Some pieces gesture toward the renowned competition more explicitly—“Olympic Cloud” by graphic designer Taku Satoh features rings in red, blue, yellow, green, and black that mimic those in the olympic logo—while others, like Tomoko Konoike’s “Wild Things – Hachilympic,” considers human subjectivity in an evolving world with a multicolor portrait that fills nearly the entire work.

If you’re in Tokyo, head to the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo before February 16 to view all 20 posters. You might also want to check out the cherry-blossom inspired torch that will mark the beginning of the 2020 games. (via Kottke)

 

 



Dlectricity, Detroit’s Light and Art Festival, is Now Accepting Artist Applications

January 20, 2020

Colossal

“{The Amazing!} House of Fog: il Cinema Nebbioso” (2017) by D Met Design: Joel Schmidt and Liz Skrisson, a fog-filled fun-house with internal novelty video projections that was part of DLECTRICITY’S children’s zone entitle Electric Park, photo by David Lewinski

For three electrifying weekends in 2012, 2014, and 2017, Dlectricity brought thousands of people into Midtown Detroit to experience 40 luminous projects by local, national, and international artists. This ambitious nighttime festival is back again with an expanded footprint, September 25-26, 2020, to transform Detroit with site-specific installations of light, video, performance, sound, interactive engineering, and nonconformist architecture. From lasers and 3D mapping to dance performances and large-scale video projections, we want to see what you create. We challenge you to animate historic buildings, activate the streets, generate engagement—the cityscape is your canvas. Now is the chance to show Detroit—and the world—what you can do!

Dlectricity will present a wide range of outdoor installations, performances and activities. We are looking for contemporary art projects that transcend traditional understanding of public art to transform the Woodward Corridor into a spectacular nighttime landscape. These temporary, site-specific artworks can include:

  • Light installations
  • Video art
  • 3D video mapping projections
  • Multimedia installations
  • Interactive and community engaging technology
  • Artificial intelligence and robotics
  • Works that utilize mobile platforms (smartphone, tablets)
  • Performance (art, dance, theatre, music)
  • Talks and workshops
  • Kid-friendly and/or educational experiences
  • Creative and/or interactive marketing experiences for the festival
  • The unexpected

Info session: Saturday, February 8, 2020, from 11a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD). This event will be live streamed.

Open call guidelines and other details can be found at Dlectricity.com.

Deadline to apply: March 3, 2020, at 11:59 p.m EST.

Follow Dlectricity on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

 



Art Photography

Neon Hues Paint Puddles of ‘Regular Rain’ in Images by Slava Semeniuta

January 19, 2020

Andrew LaSane

All images ©  VISUAL SCIENTIST, shared with permission

Russian artist and photographer Slava Semeniuta aka VISUAL SCIENTIST (previously) retouches digital photographs of puddles to create vibrant compositions of “REGULAR RAIN.” Every color of the light spectrum is reflected in neon on the smooth surface of water as it falls and sits on the asphalt. The macro view of wet streets creates a cosmic feeling for common terrestrial scenes.

Semeniuta tells Colossal that he was inspired to create the photo series a couple of weeks ago in Sochi. The way the light shimmered on the wet plants, tiles, and asphalt compelled him to return home for his camera to shoot “everything that seemed to me impressive, something that touched me. I especially liked the look of the reflection of neon light in the water,” he adds, “which froze in a thick layer, not yet having time to soak into the asphalt structure. These reflections in the puddles give me a strange feeling that I am looking into some other dimension.”

Keep scrolling down to be transported to another dimension through Semeniuta’s images, and see more of the artist’s work over on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

Squishy Flesh Suits Quilted by Textile Artist Daisy Collingridge

January 18, 2020

Andrew LaSane

“Clive a portrait” (2019). All images © Daisy Collingridge, used with permission

London-based artist Daisy Collingridge layers amorphous blobs of fabric and textiles to form wearable pastel-colored body suits. With names like Burt, Clive, and Lippy, each member of Collingridge’s family has a personality that matches his/her form. Inspired by human anatomy and infused with elements of fantasy and impulse, the artist says that the costumes are an exercise in “pushing quilting to the absolute extreme.”

Each new character begins with the construction of the head. Hand-dyed jersey and other fabric patterns are filled with plastic pellets (beans) and sewn together to form blobs in various shapes and sizes. After the underlying body structure has been formed, Collingridge begins the process of hand-stitching the blobs to the wadding. She tells Colossal that she has never clocked the process but would estimate that it takes around two months on average. The “Dave” suit is named for and modeled by her father who requested it. The others are named “like children,” and are worn and photographed by the artist herself using a remote.

Progress shot

After graduating with a degree in fashion design from Central Saint Martins, Collingridge created her first costume in 2016 for the New Zealand-based design competition, World of Wearable Art. “The squishy idea definitely came from my graduate collection, which was all free machine quilted, but all done with really fat wadding,” she told Dazed Digital. “It wasn’t really your traditional patchwork quilt.”

Some have read Collingridge’s costumes as a commentary on body image and body ideals. “It’s really fascinating because as much as I can tell people what they mean or why I make these costumes, everyone comes at it with such a different view,” she told Dazed. “They are reflective of the human form with elements of fantasy. They neither promote or demote one body type. The idea there is an ‘ideal body’ is ridiculous. We are all so different, my work is more about the ‘ideal’ way to inhabit a body. To be joyous. They bring me joy to create and I hope that is reflected.”

Collingridge tells Colossal that her “Clive” costume is currently on tour as a part of 62 Group’s Ctrl/Shift exhibition, while the rest are at her human family’s home. “My dad unpacked Dave, who has been sitting in the living room over the festive period. He was even treated some Christmas lights.” To see the artist create and model the squishy bodies, follow her on Instagram.

“Burt lunge” (2018)

“Clive Feels Like” (2018)

“Crouching Tiger Hidden Hillary” (2019)

“Dave a portrait” (2019)

“Dave on his bed” (2019)

Progress shot

 

 



Art

By Carving Into a Text, Artist Guy Laramée Finds a New Way to Excavate Meaning

January 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Dedo de Deus,” courtesy of JHB Gallery

There’s a well-known saying that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. For Guy Laramée (previously), though, a books’ contents aren’t the only important aspect either. The Montreal-based artist repurposes encyclopedic volumes and series of dictionaries to create topographic carvings that dip into and excavate the pages, framing the physical object as a work of art in itself. Laramée’s latest projects include a piece with minuscule carved steps scaling a mountainside and another with moss-covered ridges jutting up from low valleys. His work titled “Journey to the Center of the” features two side-by-side texts with a cavernous hole bored through them, piercing entirely through to the other side.

In 2018, the artist released a TEDx talk titled “No outside,” in which he considers conceptions of art in an age that fosters a growing addiction to ideas, leaving little room for contemplation. He refers to his text-based projects as being the perfect medium for exploring his “love-hate relationship with intellectual knowledge, (his) critique of the ideologies of progress, and the idea that true knowledge could very well be an erosion,” as he explores questions about the relationship between meaning, emotion, and art, more broadly.

Additional philosophical musings can be found on Laramée’s site, while he shares more of his quarried landscapes on Instagram.

Left: “Brazil II,” courtesy of Foster White Gallery. Right:”Chinese Sanscrit,” courtesy of WB Fine Arts. 

“Chinese Sanscrit,” courtesy of WB Fine Arts. 

“Nouveau Larousse Universal,” courtesy of Foster White Gallery.

“Chi,” courtesy of WB Fine Arts

Left: “Humanités.” Right: “Journey to the Center of the,” both courtesy of JHB Gallery

“Ruines,” courtesy of JHB Gallery

“Timepieces,” courtesy of JHB Gallery

 

 



Photography

Snails Paint the Town in Miniature Scenes Crafted by Aleia Murawski and Sam Copeland

January 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Aleia Murawski and Sam Copeland, shared with permission

Illinois-based Aleia Murawski and Sam Copeland have a knack for creating miniature—and slimy—worlds just big enough for their tiny acquaintances to glide through. The creative duo is known for constructing realistic domestic settings featuring plastic covered furniture and a messy painting studio occupied by snails for its stills and short films. Now, though, the artists are pushing the critters beyond their comfortable homes for a fun night out. The snails are shot sliding up to a limo, basking under the glimmer of a disco ball, and gobbling up a cheeseburger in a quaint diner.

“It is a really fun challenge for us to come up with these scenes and to find different ways to execute it so it feels believable and lived in, despite its fabrication,” Murawski told Colossal. The bowling scene utilizes a ball controlled by a magnet that the creators shot frame-by-frame as it moved along the alley. That set took multiple days to get right, she says, from using coffee stir sticks to build out the floor to employing a vacuum-foaming machine to construct each chair.

Murawksi says the duo’s process is “very rooted in play and experimentation. We are always looking for new ways to construct different elements in a scene and trying varied techniques to create depth and motion in our work.” To keep up with the snails’ shenanigans, head to Murawski’s Instagram. You can even buy a print of their slippery adventures to add to your collection.

 

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