Art Colossal Design

Chain Reaction: An International Print Show Featuring Bike-Centric Artwork

November 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

The Road by Eleni Debo

This Friday we’ll be kicking off Chain Reaction, an international print show featuring artists, designers, and printmakers from all over the world. Chain Reaction includes works by seventeen artists, including many previously featured on Colossal: Eleni Debo, Alex Senna (previously), Arna Miller (previously), Mart Aire (previously), Lydia Fu, Moniker, Fran Labuschagne, and Vance Lump.  We’re sharing half the show in this article—stay tuned for part two next week!

Each piece included in Chain Reaction was made exclusively for the exhibition and will be available in person at the Design Museum of Chicago, as well as online in The Colossal Shop. 10% of each print sale will benefit the non-profit organization Blackstone Bicycle Works. Chain Reaction is part of the Design Museum’s winter exhibition, Keep Moving, which explores the history and culture of bicycles in Chicago.

If you’re in town we’d love to see you at the opening at the Design Museum’s HQ at Block 37. You can find out more on our event page, and RSVP on to the event on Facebook. Kids are welcome and the opening is free and open to the public.

Life on Wheels by Alex Senna

Joy-Ride by Arna Miller

ANDAR by Mart Aire

Small Revolutions by Lydia Fu

Keep Moving by Moniker

Let’s Ride by Fran Labuschagne

The Rider by Vance Lump

 

 



Art

Symbiotic Assemblages by Amy Gross Combine Animals and Insects with Fictionalized Habitats

November 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South Florida-based artist Amy Gross creates hand-embroidered and beaded fiber sculptures that contain colorful nods to the natural world. Bees dot the surface of a work formed from leaves, honeycomb, and moss, while other works contain kaleidoscopic arrays of birds, mushrooms, and other fungi. Although the sculptures reflect a natural symbiosis, their structures are fictionalized in both their color and composition. None of the elements of her pieces are found objects, but rather each handmade from craft store supplies and objects like yarn, beads, wire, and paper.

“Making objects is my way of turning thought into something solid and real, and in a way, slowing time,” Gross tells Colossal. “I never use anything in my work that was ever alive, I collaborate solely with manufactured materials. They mimic living things but will not wither or die. It’s a very human desire to slow or control disintegration, to try to have a say in a volatile, uncontrollable world of change.”

Gross is included in a group exhibition titled Small Works, Big Impact which opens on November 15, 2018 at Momentum Gallery in Asheville, North Carolina. You can see more of her nature-inspired assemblages on her website.

 

 



Design

Solstice: A Wooden Kinetic Clock Expands and Contracts with the Passing Hours

November 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Solstice is a shape-shifting wooden clock designed by Matt Gilbert of the London-based studio Animaro. The new interior design object presents different configurations throughout the day, expanding to its widest form at noon when the sun is at its highest point, and contracting at 6 PM when the sun is near its lowest. This meditative movement was inspired by nature, specifically how a flower expands its petals to absorb more sunlight. The clock also is a return to our time-based roots, as its design has users rely on its shape and pattern much like we would a sundial.

The clock has two settings, one that completes a rotation every 60 seconds, and one that completes a rotation during a 12-hours cycle. To switch between the two modes, the user taps on a sensor located on the bottom of the clock. The Solstice clock is currently available for pre-order on Kickstarter. The crowdfunding campaign runs through December 13, 2018. You can see more of Animaro’s previous designs on their website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Food

Pixelated Glitches Interrupt Painted Portraits of Victorian Families, Still Lifes, and Birds

November 13, 2018

Anna Marks

The Milan-based painter Aldo Sergio uses paint to warp perception, creating portraits and still life paintings which blur the boundary between the digital and the physical, and the traditional and the contemporary. In one of his paintings, three men in clerical clothing look inquisitively at a pixelated bunch of bananas, and in another parts of a Victorian family, from their faces to conventional garments, are pixelated in rectangular lines. In a third piece a couple poses before a selection of indoor houseplants while a hen with a blurred leg stands next to their feet.

Sergio uses traditional painting methods to capture portraits of Victorian families, bowls of fruit, and birds, and then distorts these objects by covering them in small ‘glitches.’ Sergio builds tensions between objects, people and space, and his carefully painted glitch-like malfunctions to give his artworks an unusual movement, making a stark contrast to the stillness and seriousness of traditional paintings.

His solo exhibition at Galleria Patricia Armocida in Milan runs until the 30th of November, 2018. You can see more of his pixelated paintings on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

A Sharp Look at the Surprisingly Complex Process of Pencil Manufacturing by Photographer Christopher Payne

November 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Christopher Payne /Esto

Photographer Christopher Payne (previously) spent several years building a relationship with the owners of General Pencil Company in Jersey City, New Jersey, one of the last remaining pencil factories in the United States. His dedication to working with the factory paid off, and between fall 2015 and summer 2017 Payne was granted access to the production floor for photo-documentation more than thirty times.

The photographer, renowned for his cinematic images that show the architectural grace of manufacturing spaces, shares that he has held a lifelong fascination with design, assembly, and industrial processes. “The pencil is so simple and ubiquitous that we take it for granted,” Payne tells Colossal. “But making one is a surprisingly complex process, and when I saw all the steps involved, many of which are done by hand, I knew it would make for a compelling visual narrative.”

Payne received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture, though he has long focused on photography in his professional life. He has published three books and exhibited his work widely, most recently at the Wellcome Collection in London, U.K. and the Museum of the City of New York. You can see more of his work on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Origami Lava Pours from the Window of an Abandoned Building in Catalonia for LLUÈRNIA

November 12, 2018

Christopher Jobson

As part of the recent LLUÈRNIA festival of light and fire in Catalonia, collaborators David Oliva of SP25 Arquitectura and Anna Juncà of Atelier 4 created this spectacular flow of lava using common fortune teller origami figures. Over 10,000 folded pieces of paper were needed to create the work that was illuminated from underneath and further brought to life with smoke machines. Titled simply “Origami Lava,” the piece was affixed to an abandoned building in Olot, a town surrounded by dormant volcanoes. You can see more at SP25 Arquitectura. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Two Hundred and Seventy Plastic Bags Rhythmically Inflate in a New Installation by Nils Völker

November 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Two hundred and seventy white garbage bags hang like ghosts in the columned hall of Vienna, Austria’s Museum für agewandte Kunst (MAK) for the exhibition Sagmeister & Walsh: Beauty. The piece is by Nils Völker (previously), and is titled after the number of bags present in the installation. Over 1000 precisely installed fans and 45 circuit boards keep their movement on track, helping to rhythmically inflate and deflate the hanging plastic objects. The repetitive crinkling fills the vast hall, creating an audio texture akin to the rustling of tissue paper or the sound of the tide on a sandy beach.

The concave installation is divided into nine segments that each contain two columns of plastic bags. While viewing the piece from the front you can only make out the white mass of plastic. Viewing it from the side or rear however, reveals the massive amount of cables and circuitry needed to make what appears to be such an effortless piece of art function. Two Hundred and Seventy is on view at MAK in Vienna through March 2019.