Artist Maude White Counts on Squarespace to Showcase Her Stunning Papercut Artworks

February 5, 2019

Colossal

Photos by Maude White unless otherwise noted

Artist and self-described craftsperson Maude White (previously) captures gentle moments of beauty and grace in her meticulously detailed paper cut artworks. White has worked in paper for the last several years, first exploring her signature medium with simple silhouettes and popup books. The New York-based artist now focuses on the organic forms of female portraits, flowers, and birds. “Every piece I create has its own identity,” White explains. “The knife, and me, and the paper are all in a dialog together, all talking and getting along. The last thing I do is cut it out of the surrounding paper. It comes alive, or is born, and we meet each other for the first time. It’s a completely living thing apart from me.” 

“When I first started cutting paper it was not a career,” White explains to Colossal. “That’s really the way to approach anything, to do it for the joy of it and use it as a way to learn.” By sharing her work online with a Squarespace portfolio site, the self-taught artist has been able to reach a worldwide audience and find success. In addition to her gallery-ready original papercuts, White has partnered with Abrams Books and Paralax Press to release two books—Leading with Love and Brave Birds—that bring her artwork and message of uplift to life.

She shares that the methodical and meditative practice of cutting paper has been a healthy way to express her desire for order and control. In shaping her online presence as an in-demand artist, White explains that it’s very important to her to share this sense of safety and wellbeing with others: “I like all of my work to be comforting or a safe space. Beauty is a form of love. Creating something beautiful allows people to experience love when they look at it.”

White shares that creating her website on Squarespace allows her to feel assured that her website stands up to the finesse of her artwork. “I like things to look the same, flow together, and stay consistent. I love black and white. I like having control and knowing exactly what i’m looking at and what i’m going to get, and it’s always going to look beautiful.”

Ready to set your portfolio site apart? Head to Squarespace.com for a free trial and when you’re ready to launch, use the offer code COLOSSAL to save 10% off your first purchase.

Photograph by Laura Glazer; hand-cut paper by Maude White; reproduced from Brave Birds, Abrams Image, 2018

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Art

Dream Worlds Imagined in Contorted Clay Portraits by Johnson Tsang

February 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Remembrance”

Johnson Tsang (previously) continues to create spectacularly emotive ceramic sculptures of the human face. The Hong Kong-based artist’s latest series, Lucid Dream II, features surreal contortions that squish, wring, melt, and stretch. Titles like “Remembrance,” “Extrication,” and “Unveiled” suggest an exploration of the liminal space between the conscious and subconscious, in addition to the self and other. Tsang uses plain, unglazed clay, eschewing typical lifelike details such as color, hair, and apparel, to focus the viewer’s attention on the universally-relatable expressions of each of his imagined subjects. You can see more of the sculptor’s completed and in-progress work on Instagram and Facebook.

“Here and There”

“Here and There” detail

“Work in Progress”

“Under the Skin”

“Love in Progress”

“Falling in Love”

“Unveiled”

“Lawful Custody”

“Extrication”

 

 



Art

Recycled Shirts and Ski Equipment Take on Sculptural Dimensions in Layered Works by Kaarina Kaikkonen

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kaarina Kaikkonen, "I Sprouted Into New Dimensions" (2017), Mixed media, 96.46 x 163.39 x 8.66 inches, via Galerie Forsblom

Kaarina Kaikkonen, “I Sprouted Into New Dimensions” (2017), Mixed media, 96.46 x 163.39 x 8.66 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

Finnish artist Kaarina Kaikkonen (previously) transforms old consumer products into sculptural works that are presented both in galleries and as sprawling site-specific installations. In her large-scale apparel-based works, lines of shirts hang in orderly lines above city streets, while in smaller pieces like “I Feel Safe” (2015), she creates an angel-like formation with spread shirt sleeves as wings. In 2015, the artist built a site-specific installation in Tempere, Finland using Finnish cross country skis to create a colorful support for an angular building.

You can take an further look into her studio in this video produced in connection with her 2018 exhibition “You Remain in Me” at the KUNSTEN Museum of Modern Art in Aalborg, Denmark, and see more images of her sculptures on her website and via Galerie Forsblom.

"Only a Breath of Wind" (2010), Men's shirts, 15.75 x 133.86 x 47.24 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

“Only a Breath of Wind” (2010), Men’s shirts, 15.75 x 133.86 x 47.24 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

"I Feel Safe" (2015), Men's shirts and child's clothes, image via Sara Zanin Gallery

“I Feel Safe” (2015), Men’s shirts and child’s clothes, image via Sara Zanin Gallery

L: "Whereabouts" (2014), Man's jacket, 93.5 x 61.5 x 6 inches, R: "Night Hawkmoth" (2014), Man's jacket, hook, 24.5 x 28 x 7 inches, images via Galerie Forsblom

L: “Whereabouts” (2014), Man’s jacket, 93.5 x 61.5 x 6 inches, R: “Night Hawkmoth” (2014), Man’s jacket, hook, 24.5 x 28 x 7 inches, images via Galerie Forsblom

Image from 2014 exhibition with Galerie Forsblom

Image from 2014 exhibition with Galerie Forsblom

"The Upsurging Spirit" (2015), Old Finish cross country skis, site-specific, Tempere, Finland, image via Sara Zenin Gallery

“The Upsurging Spirit” (2015), Old Finish cross country skis, site-specific, Tempere, Finland, image via Sara Zenin Gallery

 

 



Photography

Balloons Precariously Compressed Between Marble Slabs in Photo Series by Daniel Forero

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In art director and photographer Daniel Forero’s most recent series Air, slabs of marble trap, compress, and squish inflated balloons. The series was inspired by the shapes and colors of stones that compose the buildings in his new home of Paris. Forero wanted to focus on the ways that architectural materials create beauty through balance, and decided to create scenes that would emphasize the stone’s weight.

“The sculptures create tension, but at the same time harmony,” Forero explains to Colossal. “It was difficult to put the objects together in a natural way without any help from other objects. There were a lot of failures in the process, but once the objects ‘fit’ they stood still in perfect balance for several days until I removed them from my table.” You can see more of Forero’s compositions on his website, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Animation

Wide-Mouthed Heads Consume and Absorb a Range of Mutable Forms in the Short Film “Distortion”

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish animator and sculptor Alexander Unger (previously here and here) creates stop motion animations and tutorials on his Youtube channel titled Guldies. His most recent claymation, Distortion, follows the transformation of eight dice-sized blue cubes into a series of limbs, puddles, and wide-mouthed heads that consume and absorb the previous clay form in rapid succession. Although captivating to watch, the sound effects add another dimension to the short film. Each metallic ting or watery bloop tricks the eye into believing the clay is harder or softer than it appears on screen. Watch out for a twist ending that ties the whole piece together as a beautiful looping narrative. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Photography

Bodies Flip, Dance, and Stack in Gravity-Defying Images by Rob Woodcox

February 1, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Fine art and fashion photographer Rob Woodcox works with dancers to create striking images of human bodies pushed past their physical threshold with a bit of creative editing. Impossible feats of the body are achieved in his photography, such as an image of subjects curved in both convex and concave positions while suspended in the air, and another of bodies stacked meticulously in a sort of Tetris-style configuration. You can view more of Woodcox’s creative presentations of the human form on Instagram, and buy select prints of his work on his website. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Amazing Art

A Recursive Series of Paintings Inspired by One Woman’s Second-Ever Work of Art

February 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Over the last two weeks, Redditors have been slowly but steadily breaking the internet’s space-time continuum with a series of recursive paintings. The fateful catalyst was posted on Reddit two weeks ago, with a photo of a woman (the Redditor’s mother) holding a painting of a bird, her second painting ever. The photo’s caption, “My mom painted this and said no one would like it. It’s her 2nd painting,” inspired another user to paint a painting of the woman holding her painting, captioned “I painted somebody’s mom,” and mayhem ensued from there.

Each successive painting includes a caption chronicling their location in the multi-branched series. The result is a fascinating chain of events that connects online and offline experiences, and has gotten more than a few some-time painters back at their brushes. You can follow the progress of this real-life meme via Nick Kapur on Twitter.