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Art

Glitched Paintings by Olan Ventura Give a Contemporary Twist to 17th Century Still Lifes

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Still Life of Flowers, Shells and Insects” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 76.2 x 101.6 cm. All images courtesy of the artist, the Working Animals Art Projects and Yavuz Gallery

Filipino artist Olan Ventura creates lavish acrylic paintings in the tradition of 17th century Dutch still lifes. Replicating the smallest details of iconic works such as Jan Davidsz de Heem’s Vase of Flowers (c. 1660), Ventura veers off course with striking glitches and drips that shoot off the canvas edges, seeming to pull grapes, lobsters, and roses from the past into the present. A statement on Yavuz Gallery explains that Ventura is interested in identity, technology, popular culture. Ventura holds a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from University of the East, and has been exhibiting in solo shows for the last 15 years. His most recent show, Colour Feast, ran this spring at Yavuz Gallery in Singapore. Ventura keeps a low profile online, but you can explore more of his still life paintings on Yavuz’s website, and a wider range of his work on artnet. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Abundant Bouquet with Pomegranate” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 162.5 x 121.9 cm

“Still Life With Golden Goblet” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 121.9 x 137.2 cm

L: “Still Life with a Melon and Pears” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 45.7 x 61 cm / R: “Fruit Basket” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 45.7 x 61 cm

“Still Life of Flowers” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

“Fruit Still Life” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

Yavuz Gallery installation view

Yavuz Gallery installation view

 

 



Art Illustration

Blue and White Greenhouse Illustrations Appear like Sun-Baked Cyanotypes

February 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese artist Ana Frois uses her background in architecture to draft precise structures she fills with imaginative monochrome plants and miniature gardening accessories. The series, simply titled Greenhouses, is created with white pencil on top of deep blue acrylic on paper. The ghostly forms are reminiscent of a cyanotype or faded architectural sketch, as if the clean-cut floating renderings are memories from another time. You can find more of Frois’s drawings on Instagram, and purchase prints of her work on Etsy.

 

 



Art

Abstract Goldfish Swim Through Imitation Plastic Bags in Multi-Media Constructions by Riusuke Fukahori

November 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All image courtesy of the artist and Joshua Liner Gallery

Riusuke Fukahori (previously) has long admired the appearance of goldfish, immortalizing realistic depictions of the small creature in layers of acrylic and resin. Previously Fukahori has focused on paintings of goldfish moving inside of Japanese household objects such as bamboo hats, wooden sake cups, and handmade bowls. For his new Irobukuro series his inspiration has turned to imitating the vessels and scenery of Mong Kok’s Goldfish Market in Hong Kong, where rows of colorful fish line stall after stall. For the included works he molds resin to resemble plastic bags filled with water. Instead of realistically depicting the detailed scales, eyes, and fins of the fish Fukahori paints abstractly to capture how a goldfish glides through the water.

These works, along with some of his more traditionally painted pieces in memory-laden objects are included in his third solo exhibition with Joshua Liner Gallery  in New York City, titled Goldfish Blossoms. Fukahori will present realistic paintings in black bowls used at a Buddhist temple, paint cans from his studio, and a wooden oke tub previously used at a restaurant he frequented as a child. The exhibition opens on December 13, 2018 and runs through January 19, 2019.

 

 



Art Illustration

Ethereal Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh Explore Cultural Displacement and Elements of Folklore

November 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

North Carolina-based painter Duy Huynh (previously) infuses his acrylic paintings with whimsical elements of visual storytelling, where a plume of instruments rises from a rushing locomotive and the moon hovers as a balloon tethered to the wrist of a woman. Huynh arrived in the U.S. from Vietnam in the 1980s and often revisits this period of cultural acclimatization in his artwork. Via his artist statement:

Themes of geographical and cultural displacement are prevalent in Duy’s artwork. Ethereal characters maintain a serene, precarious balance, often in a surreal or dreamlike setting. With his figures, Duy explores motion along with emotion in order to portray not just the beauty of the human form, but also the triumph of the human spirit.

Huynh is the co-owner of Lark & Key Gallery and many of his original works and prints are currently available.

 

 



Art

Collaborative Acrylic Paintings That Aim to Visually Map the Perceptual Experiences of Synesthesia

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

American artist and filmmaker Lucy Engelman has a far different experience of the world than most. Engelman has a phenomenon called Synesthesia, which crosses her perceptual pathways to allow her to taste colors, smell sounds, and even experience verbal data as a spectrum of vibrant colors. Engelman’s husband, Scottish painter Daniel Mullen, decided to translate her complex sensory world in a way that might be easier to understand for those of us who don’t see days and numbers as pockets of color.

The collaboration exists as a set of paintings titled A Different Kind of Time: Sequencing Spatial Temporal Synesthesia. The works each contain a sequence of flat rectangular shapes arranged in a variety of arches and lines. The angle of the shapes is switched in each work, some aligned with only one side facing the audience, while others seem to project right through the canvas or retreat back into the painting’s rotated plane. Engelman explains the works are the closest visual approximation to what she experiences, especially in relation to her mind’s translation of letters, numbers, and time.

You can view more of the paintings based on Engelman’s unique view of the world on Daniel Mullen’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Photography

Three-Dimensional Landscapes Formed with Layered Acrylic Photographs by Nobuhiro Nakanishi

June 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

Japanese artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi creates sculptural works that attempt to preserve a singular moment in the natural world, capturing deeply pigmented sunsets and brightly-lit forests in a series he’s titled Layer Drawings. To produce the three-dimensional installations, Nakanishi first photographs an environment over a period of time. He then mounts selected images from his documentation on panels of acrylic in chronological order, allowing slight variation from frame to frame.

“We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way,” says Nakaniski, “Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.”

Nakaniski is represented by Yukimo Chiba Associates in Tokyo. You can see more of his layered works on his website. (via Tu Recepcja)

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan
 (2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Depictions of Fish Merged With Their Coral Environments by Lisa Ericson

December 15, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist, illustrator, and designer Lisa Ericson (previously) paints hyperrealistic images of imaginary animals, hybrids that intertwine species. Previously focused on a body of work that merged mice and butterflies, Ericson’s newest series focuses on the creatures below, painting bright fish against matte black backgrounds. The vibrant works highlight a variety of coral integrated into fins and tails of scaly animals, as well as showcasing the groups of fish that have decided to make these tails their home.

Ericson’s work is currently in a two-person exhibition titled Supernature at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR which runs through December 22. You can view more of her in-process and completed animal paintings on her Instagram and Facebook.

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