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Art Craft Design

Native Argentine Landscapes Explored in New Hand-Tufted Rugs by Alexandra Kehayoglou

September 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Santa Cruz River" (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm, Presented at National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Triennial | Melbourne, Australia 2018. Commissioned and acquired by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

“Santa Cruz River” (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm, Courtesy of The National Gallery of Victoria.

Textile artist Alexandra Kehayoglou (previously) creates functional works of art that explore the natural landscapes of her native Argentina. Her selected locations are often ones tied to political controversy, such as the Santa Cruz River, or areas dramatically altered by human activity, such as the Raggio creek. Kehayoglou uses her craft as a chance as a call for environmental awareness, embedding her own memory and research of the disappearing waterways and grasslands into her hand-tufted works.

Each tapestry uses surplus materials from her family’s factory, which has manufactured industrial carpets for more than six decades. The one-of-a-kind carpets are often installed against the wall, with a section of the work trailing along the floor so visitors can walk or lay on the woven rugs.

In December 2017, her piece Santa Cruz River was included in the National Gallery of Victoria Triennial in Melbourne. The installation showcased her research behind the future damming of the river and her own interpretation of the harm that will continue to influence the surrounding area. Later this month Kehayoglou will present a new site-specific tapestry that explores the tribes of Patagonia in the group exhibition Dream at the Chiostro del Bramante in Rome. You can see more of her work on her website and Instagram.

"Santa Cruz River" detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

“Santa Cruz River” detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

"Santa Cruz River" detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

“Santa Cruz River” detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

"Hope the voyage is a long one" (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

“Hope the voyage is a long one” (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

"Hope the voyage is a long one" (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

“Hope the voyage is a long one” (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

"No Longer Creek" (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 820 x 460 cm, Presented at Design Miami/ Basel, 2016 | Basel, Switzerland. Commissioned by Artsy. Courtesy of Artsy & The National Gallery of Victoria.

“No Longer Creek” (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 820 x 460 cm, Presented at Design Miami/ Basel, 2016 | Basel, Switzerland. Commissioned by Artsy. Courtesy of Artsy & The National Gallery of Victoria.

"Santa Cruz River II" (2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 205 x 150 cm

“Santa Cruz River II” (2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 205 x 150 cm

 

 



Art

Shuttlecocks, Pool Noodles, and Other Playful Materials Arranged into Three-Dimensional ‘Textiles’ by We Make Carpets

September 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Shuttlecock Carpet for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017), all images via We Make Carpets

Shuttlecock Carpet for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017), all images via We Make Carpets

Dutch art trio We Make Carpets (previously) formed their first temporary tapestry in 2009 from collected pine cones and needles, which they appropriated titled Forest Carpet. For almost a decade since, the collective has been working with ordinary materials to create visually seductive “carpets” arranged on the floor or presented vertically on the wall. Last year they were asked to create six new works and five interactive installations for a solo exhibition at the inaugural National Gallery of Victoria Triennial in Melbourne titled Hands On. Carpets were formed from child-friendly materials such as pool noodles and velcro, which invited visitors to create their own patterns from the provided objects.

“While making art we rely on a hands-on approach—working with the materials that you have in your hands—trying and failing until finally something beautiful emerges,” We Make Carpets said in a statement about the exhibition. “We believe the images in your head are more important than the things already known. It is fantasy that creates, not facts. We hope our arrangements of objects offer new perspectives on modern life.”

Hands On just concluded a second run on September 9 at the National Gallery Singapore. You can take a look inside the making of a recent site-specific installation for The Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University in Houston in the video below, and see a more extensive collection of their temporary carpets on their website and Instagram.

Shuttlecock Carpet (detail) for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Shuttlecock Carpet (detail) for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Shuttlecock Carpet for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Shuttlecock Carpet for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Pencil Carpet for Jerusalem Design Week (2017)

Pencil Carpet for Jerusalem Design Week (2017)

Pencil Carpet (detail) for Jerusalem Design Week (2017)

Pencil Carpet (detail) for Jerusalem Design Week (2017)

Tube Carpet 2 made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Tube Carpet 2 made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Tube Carpet made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Tube Carpet made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Tube Carpet 2 (detail) made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Tube Carpet 2 (detail) made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Peg Carpet 2 made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Peg Carpet 2 made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Peg Carpet 2 (detail) made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Peg Carpet 2 (detail) made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Velcro Carpet made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Velcro Carpet made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Velcro Carpet (detail) made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Velcro Carpet (detail) made for the exhibition Hands On at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2017)

Paperclip Carpet 2 (detail) made for the exhibition Bend and Stretch at Diagonale, Montreal, Canada (2016)

Paperclip Carpet 2 (detail) made for the exhibition Bend and Stretch at Diagonale, Montreal, Canada (2016)

Paperclip Carpet 2 made for the exhibition Bend and Stretch at Diagonale, Montreal, Canada (2016)

Paperclip Carpet 2 made for the exhibition Bend and Stretch at Diagonale, Montreal, Canada (2016)

 

 



Art

Life-Size Animals Emerge from Persian Rugs in Perception-Defying Sculptures by Debbie Lawson

August 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Red Bear”

British sculptor Debbie Lawson works in the space between two and three dimensions, forming wild animals that emerge from old-fashioned rugs. The artist builds her animals from scratch, using chicken wire and masking tape, and then covers them with identical or near-identical Persian carpets to create the illusion that the creature is fused with the hanging rug.

Lawson explains to Colossal, “I have always ‘accidentally’ spotted images in patterns, on textured walls and floors made of wood or lino – any material really. It’s an obsession that I decided to explore in the studio, using first wood grain and then carpet to make work in which the pattern morphed into an actual image or form…More recently I have focussed on animal forms to explore the idea of camouflage, and of its opposite: display.”

Red Bear is on display until August 19 2018 at the Royal Academy of Arts in London as part of the 250th Summer Exhibition curated by Grayson Perry. Persian bear is permanently displayed (along with a moose in the same style) at London’s Town Hall Hotel. You can see more of Lawson’s finished works and take peeks into her studio process on Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Red Bear Head”

“White Stag”

“Red Bear Head” and “White Stag” (detail)

“Persian Bear”

 

 



Art Design

Nature-Based Textiles by Vanessa Barragão Highlight Ecosystems Above and Below the Sea

December 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese textile artist Vanessa Barragão produces carpets and tapestries from a variety of different techniques, creating multi-faceted landscapes with the use of latch hooking, crochet, weaving, basketry, and felt. Her environmental works present imitation coral, fungi, and algae as three-dimensional elements in plush contexts such as the circular work viewed above which she calls Earth Rug. The piece was developed for this year’s Milan Design Week and spans nearly 15 feet in diameter.

You can shop Barragão’s smaller coral-decorated textiles on her Etsy Shop, and view more of her larger works on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

New Hand-Painted Persian Carpets With Vibrantly Hued Details by Jason Seife

December 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

With a steady hand and several fine-point brushes, Miami-based artist Jason Seife (previously) produces paintings that mimic the ornate patterns found in Persian carpets. Seife presents the same geometric symmetry seen in historic designs, yet takes his own liberties with the colors of ink and acrylic paint chosen for each work. The vibrant hues selected are not ones traditionally found in Persian textiles, but are his way to imbue his own state of mind into each piece.

Seife is currently represented by Robert Fontaine Gallery. You can see more of his carpet-based paintings on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Art Craft Design

New One-of-a-Kind Landscape Rugs by Alexandra Kehayoglou

September 9, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Argentinean artist Alexandra Kehayoglou (previously) produces handmade wool rugs that appear like aerial snapshots of dreamy pastoral landscapes. Mimicking lush environments filled with trees and moss, her hand-tufted works can take up to several months to complete depending on size. One of her most recent pieces is a carpeted runway for designer Dries Van Noten made in collaboration with artist Danish artist Olafur Eliasson. Another piece, titled No Longer Creek and curated by Artsy, was included at this year’s Design Miami/ Basel from June 14-20.

You can take a look at more of Kehayoglou’s tufted wool landscapes on Instagram, Artsy, and on her website.

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Art

Elaborate Hand-Painted Persian Carpets by Jason Seife

August 12, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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In this new series of paintings, Miami-based artist Jason Seife deftly renders the intricate patterns of old Persian carpets with a mixture of acrylic and ink. While the paintings utilize familiar motifs in rug design like leaves and geometric shapes, Seife introduces colors not normally associated with the heavy textiles, creating his own interpretations that reflect his mood or thoughts while executing the painting. Via Robert Fontaine Gallery:

What initially drew him to these works was not only the aesthetic but the dense history and meaning behind the imagery. The way the weavers were able to link each rug’s particular pattern, palette, and style with a specific and identifiable geographic area or nomadic tribe really stood out to him. Jason aims to mirror this practice with his take on the carpets by having each color and pattern specifically correlate to what state of mind and emotion he was in while creating the specific work.

Seife has exhibited internationally and his work was recently incorporated into a special facade projection artwork with The Bronx and Brooklyn Museum. He’s currently represented by Robert Fontaine Gallery and you can see more of his new carpet paintings on Instagram.

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