carving

Posts tagged
with carving



Art

Intricate Patterns Hand-Carved into Fruit and Vegetables by Takehiro Kishimoto

March 1, 2020

Andrew LaSane

All images © Takehiro Kishimoto

When he’s not cooking them, Japanese chef and food artist Takehiro Kishimoto (previously) is turning fruits and vegetables into intricately carved sculptures too beautiful to eat. Using sharp handheld blades, Kishimoto combines the centuries-old art of Thai fruit carving with the Japanese art of Mukimono to decorate apples, carrots, broccoli, and broad beans with geometric patterns and elaborate designs.

The precision easily could be mistaken for digital photo manipulation were it not for the process videos that Kishimoto shares on his Instagram, where he also writes that he hopes the Thai carving tradition will spread around the world. With more than 284,000 followers watching flowers bloom from stalks and carrots become interlocking chains, we’d say that his hopes already are coming true. To see more of the artist’s handiwork, go ahead and hit that follow button.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by gaku carving (@gakugakugakugakugaku1) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by gaku carving (@gakugakugakugakugaku1) on

 

 

 



Art

By Carving Into a Text, Artist Guy Laramée Finds a New Way to Excavate Meaning

January 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Dedo de Deus,” courtesy of JHB Gallery

There’s a well-known saying that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. For Guy Laramée (previously), though, a books’ contents aren’t the only important aspect either. The Montreal-based artist repurposes encyclopedic volumes and series of dictionaries to create topographic carvings that dip into and excavate the pages, framing the physical object as a work of art in itself. Laramée’s latest projects include a piece with minuscule carved steps scaling a mountainside and another with moss-covered ridges jutting up from low valleys. His work titled “Journey to the Center of the” features two side-by-side texts with a cavernous hole bored through them, piercing entirely through to the other side.

In 2018, the artist released a TEDx talk titled “No outside,” in which he considers conceptions of art in an age that fosters a growing addiction to ideas, leaving little room for contemplation. He refers to his text-based projects as being the perfect medium for exploring his “love-hate relationship with intellectual knowledge, (his) critique of the ideologies of progress, and the idea that true knowledge could very well be an erosion,” as he explores questions about the relationship between meaning, emotion, and art, more broadly.

Additional philosophical musings can be found on Laramée’s site, while he shares more of his quarried landscapes on Instagram.

Left: “Brazil II,” courtesy of Foster White Gallery. Right:”Chinese Sanscrit,” courtesy of WB Fine Arts. 

“Chinese Sanscrit,” courtesy of WB Fine Arts. 

“Nouveau Larousse Universal,” courtesy of Foster White Gallery.

“Chi,” courtesy of WB Fine Arts

Left: “Humanités.” Right: “Journey to the Center of the,” both courtesy of JHB Gallery

“Ruines,” courtesy of JHB Gallery

“Timepieces,” courtesy of JHB Gallery

 

 



Art

Crystal Hearts and Translucent Tongues Shaped Into Sculptural Works by Debra Baxter

August 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Cross My Heart” (2019), Glass, Crystal Geode, 4.5″ x 5″ x 3″

Santa Fe-based sculptor and jewelry designer Debra Baxter combines glass, bronze, crystal, wood, and found objects to create ghostly sculptures of human forms. In one piece titled “Cross My Heart” (2019), a purple heart sits on top of a rough cluster of geodes, while in ‘First Taste” (2017), a glass tongue protrudes from a slab of quartz crystal.

For many of her recent works Baxter, shares with Roq Larue Gallery that she drew inspiration from the phenomenon of the “Ghost Heart.” In this medical procedure, a heart is cleansed of all of its blood cells and then injected with hundreds of millions of new blood steam cells which cause the heart to begin beating again. Baxter is interested in how this concept explores the complexity of existence, walking the line between life and death.  You can see more of her sculpted hearts and wearable artworks on her website and Instagram.

“Crystal Brass Knuckles (Aura Blow)” (2017), Aqua Aura Crystal and White Rhodium Plated Bronze, 7″ x 5″ x 2″

“Ghost Hand” (2019), Glass, Smoky Quarts, 13″ x 11″ x 12″

“First Taste” (2017), Glass and Quartz Crystal, 6″ x 8″ x 4″

“Silver Heart” (2019), Silver, Quartz, 3″ x 3.5″ x 5.75″

“I’m Your Venus” (2017), Cast Glass, Bronze, 5″ x 5.5″ x 2.5″

“Wind Knocked In” (2017), Amethyst, Bronze, Mopany Wood, 9.5″ x 15″ x 6.5″

“Heart of Gold” (2019), Bronze, Thunder Bay amethyst, 3″ x 3.5″ x 5.75″

 

 



Art

Chairs, Stools, and Coat Racks Carved into Raw Pieces of Wood by Alicja Kwade

March 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Achairisatreeisachair" (2017), image by Roman März

“Achairisatreeisachair” (2017), image by Roman März

Polish artist Alicja Kwade carves into tree trunks to create 3/4-formed stools and chairs that balance with the support of the unfinished segments of wood. The carved furniture would be simple in its construction if taken out of context, but in conjunction with the tree trunks the pieces exist in a liminal space between design object and source material. Kwade’s carved furniture is currently exhibited with Berlin-based König Galerie at the The Armory Show in New York through March 10, 2019. You can see more of her work, like these sculptural installations that create illusions with tree trunks and mirrors, on her website and Instagram.

Detail of "Achairisatreeisachair" (2017), image by Roman März

Detail of “Achairisatreeisachair” (2017), image by Roman März

"Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker” (2017), photo by Roman März

"Astoolisastoolisastool" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Astoolisastoolisastool” (2017), photo by Roman März

"Astoolisastoolisastool" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Astoolisastoolisastool” (2017), photo by Roman März

Images via @koeniggalerie

Images via @koeniggalerie

"Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker" (2017), photo by Roman März

“Ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker ist ein Barhocker” (2017), photo by Roman März

Current installation of Alicja Kwade's work at König Galerie's booth at the Armory Show in New York

Current installation of Alicja Kwade’s work at König Galerie’s booth at the Armory Show in New York

 

 



Art

Mountainous Landforms Top Carved Book Configurations by Guy Laramée

January 23, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Historia das Americas II

Historia das Americas II

Guy Laramée (previously) erects topographic specimen from collections of vintage books. His carved sculptures imitate the mountains of knowledge once physically collected in books rather than compiled via digital means. In this series of new works from 2017-2018 the Montreal-based artist incorporates traditional methods of book organization as integral parts of the sculptures— such as box set containers, simple wood stands, and metal bookends reminiscent of public libraries. Laramée’s work is included in the group exhibition “Unbound” at TwoRivers Gallery in Prince George, British Columbia through March 31, 2019. You can see more of his sculptural takes on vintage anthologies on his website.

Historia das Americas II

Historia das Americas II

Boa Esperança

Boa Esperança

Boa Esperança

Boa Esperança

Whale

Whale

Chapada

Chapada

Whale

Whale

L'Énigme

L’Énigme

L'Énigme

L’Énigme

Chapada

Chapada

 

 



Art

Carved Wood Sculptures by Phil Young Appear to Stretch, Twist, and Tear Within Metal Armatures

December 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Grasp”

Artist Phil Young twists the commonly-held perception of wood as a stiff material in his mind-bending sculptures made of polished wood and metal. Each artwork focuses on a single piece of wood that has been carefully carved to appear as if it is being stretched, twisted, bound, or squashed, often by visible forces like metal rings or nails. Young works carefully with each bit of raw material, paying attention to its natural shape and grain as he transforms it into a finished work.

Although his work is non-representational, he is able to evoke a surprising degree of emotion through the dynamic pressure the pieces appear to be subjected to. “I wouldn’t be satisfied if all I did was make beautiful pieces,” the artist explains. “I want the people who see them to question what beauty is, so I take inspiration from places you wouldn’t expect to find beauty, including surgery, diseases, wounded or wrinkled skin, and try to make that look beautiful. I think if you can find beauty even in these places, you can find happiness wherever you are.” You can see more of Young’s woodwork on his website and Instagram. (via Lustik)

“Stretch”

“Twist”

“Crush”

“Crush” detail

“Taut”

“Nail”

“Pinch”

“Clamp”

 

 



Art Design Food

Delicate Flowers and Interlocking Tessellations Carved into Fruits and Vegetables by Takehiro Kishimoto

October 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese chef and skilled food carver Takehiro Kishimoto (previously) explores the traditional art of produce design on his captivating Instagram account. Here he posts cucumbers, radishes, and avocados that have been transformed into detailed patterns and skillfully rendered motifs, in addition to kiwis and carrots that blossom into ornate flowers. His most impressive designs might be his interactive apple and watermelon works which he carves to expand like lanterns when pulled from the top.

The popular food artist is from Kobe, Japan, and has only been carving for the last three or so years. Many of his designs are based on traditional Japanese patterns, yet combine inspirations from both Thai fruit carving and the Japanese art of decorative garnishing, or Mukimono. Take a look at some of his more intricate work in the videos below.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by gaku carving (@gakugakugakugakugaku1) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by gaku carving (@gakugakugakugakugaku1) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by gaku carving (@gakugakugakugakugaku1) on