carving

Posts tagged
with carving



Art Illustration

Eve: A New Intergalactic Woodcut Print by Tugboat Printshop

May 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Eve is the newest multi-colored woodcut print from Valerie Lueth of Pittsburgh-based Tugboat Printshop (previously here and here). The limited edition print is created from layering four different blocks, each containing a separate color. Once combined, an orange and green hand is seen suspended in the cosmos, flowers and plants growing wildly from the extended limb. The print is currently available for pre-order, with an anticipated ship date of mid-June. You can learn more about the making of Eve, as well as order your own print, on Tugboat Printshop’s website.

 

 



Craft Food

Dragons and Floral Designs Carved from Soap and Melons

May 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

If you’re up for some impressive carving of soap, melons, and other objects, head on over to the Instagram account of @krasinthusith who transforms the simple materials into amazing winged dragons and floral-inspired sculptures. If you liked this, also check out the work of Gaku.

 

 



Art

Magnificent New Carved Book Landscapes and Architecture by Guy Laramée

May 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Montreal-based artist Guy Laramée (previously) recently unveiled a new body of sculptural work, highlighting his evolving ability to excavate mountainous landscapes, cavernous hollows, and sloping watersheds from the dense pages of repurposed books. One of his favorite mediums are bound stacks of old dictionaries and encyclopedias which he carves using a method of sandblasting to which he later applies oil paints, inks, pigments and dry pastels, crayon, adhesives, and beeswax. When photographed up close the works appear almost realistic, as if the viewer is looking at aerial or satellite topographies of Earth. You can explore more of Laramée’s latest work at JHB Gallery.

 

 



Craft

Super Satisfying Video of a Woodcarver Making ‘Fibonacci’ Spiral Shavings

April 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In this all too brief video woodworker Paul Sellers gives us a close-up view as he creates a number of ultra satisfying ‘Fibonacci’ spiral shavings. Between the soothing music, camerawork, and the mathematical perfection of each spiral as it rises from the wood, I could watch something like this all day. Somebody call somebody and turn this into an episode of Slow TV? (via Boing Boing, The Awesomer)

 

 



Craft Food

New Elaborate Patterns and Designs Carved on Produce by ‘Gaku’

April 14, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Although we first mentioned his work here only a month ago, food artist Gaku has continues to share numerous examples of his inventive approach to food carving called mukimono. Gaku works with little more than an x-acto knife to carve quickly before the fruit or vegetable starts to change color, executing motifs and patterns often found in Japanese art. You can see even more of his latest works on Instagram.

 

 



Craft Food

Next-Level Food Carving on Fruits and Vegetables by ‘Gaku’

March 4, 2017

Johnny Waldman

Japan has a rich tradition of food carving called mukimono. If you’ve ever eaten at a fancy restaurant in Japan you might have found a carrot carved into a bunny, garnishing your plate. But in the hands of Japanese artist Gaku, the art of fruit and vegetable carving is elevated to a new realm of edible creations.

One constraint to carving fruits and vegetables is that sometimes you must work fast. The moment a peel is removed, oxidization will start to discolor your artwork. So, depending on the variety, Gaku’s carvings are probably created within several minutes. Armed with a tool similar to an x-acto knife and a fruit or vegetable from the grocery store, Gaku carves intricate patterns that are often inspired by traditional Japanese motifs.

Gaku points out that the banana is great fruit to practice with because it’s cheap and easy to carve. When asked what he does with all his creations after he’s done, his reply is simple: he eats them. “Except for the banana peel.”

You can see more of Gaku’s creations on his Instagram account. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art History

16th Century Miniature Boxwood Carvings That Fit in the Palm of Your Hand

January 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photo by Craig Boyko

Carved the size of a palm or smaller, these miniature boxwood carvings featuring religious iconography from the early 16th century have long been a mystery to researchers in the field. It is believed that the entire body of work was created during a 30-year window between 1500 and 1530, somewhere in Flanders or the Netherlands.

The tiny altarpieces, rosaries, and prayer beads are each produced from a single boxwood fragment, incorporating pins smaller than a grass seed that hold the pieces together. Using micro CT scanning and Advanced 3D Analysis Software, curators and conservators of Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures an exhibition at The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rijksmuseum have gained new insight into the materials and subject matter of each boxwood carving.

Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures will showcase AGO’s collection along with 50 other loaned pieces from other museums and private collections, including some rare carvings that have never been seen in North America. One work, the eleven-bead Chatsworth Rosary (c. 1509-1526), was owned by King Henry VIII and his wife Catherine of Aragon. You can tour the full exhibition yourself at the AGO through January 22, at the Met Cloisters on February 21, 2017, or when the exhibition makes its last stop at the Rijksmuseum on June 15, 2017.

You can also follow AGO on their journey to discovering the mystery behind the boxwood miniatures in the video below, as well as see detailed images from the entire collection on AGO’s website. (via The History Blog)

Photo by Ian Lefebvre

Photo by Craig Boyko

Photo by Ian Lefebvre

Photo by Craig Boyko