carving

Posts tagged
with carving



Craft

Super Satisfying Video of a Woodcarver Making ‘Fibonacci’ Spiral Shavings

April 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In this all too brief video woodworker Paul Sellers gives us a close-up view as he creates a number of ultra satisfying ‘Fibonacci’ spiral shavings. Between the soothing music, camerawork, and the mathematical perfection of each spiral as it rises from the wood, I could watch something like this all day. Somebody call somebody and turn this into an episode of Slow TV? (via Boing Boing, The Awesomer)

 

 



Craft Food

New Elaborate Patterns and Designs Carved on Produce by ‘Gaku’

April 14, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Although we first mentioned his work here only a month ago, food artist Gaku has continues to share numerous examples of his inventive approach to food carving called mukimono. Gaku works with little more than an x-acto knife to carve quickly before the fruit or vegetable starts to change color, executing motifs and patterns often found in Japanese art. You can see even more of his latest works on Instagram.

 

 



Craft Food

Next-Level Food Carving on Fruits and Vegetables by ‘Gaku’

March 4, 2017

Johnny Waldman

Japan has a rich tradition of food carving called mukimono. If you’ve ever eaten at a fancy restaurant in Japan you might have found a carrot carved into a bunny, garnishing your plate. But in the hands of Japanese artist Gaku, the art of fruit and vegetable carving is elevated to a new realm of edible creations.

One constraint to carving fruits and vegetables is that sometimes you must work fast. The moment a peel is removed, oxidization will start to discolor your artwork. So, depending on the variety, Gaku’s carvings are probably created within several minutes. Armed with a tool similar to an x-acto knife and a fruit or vegetable from the grocery store, Gaku carves intricate patterns that are often inspired by traditional Japanese motifs.

Gaku points out that the banana is great fruit to practice with because it’s cheap and easy to carve. When asked what he does with all his creations after he’s done, his reply is simple: he eats them. “Except for the banana peel.”

You can see more of Gaku’s creations on his Instagram account. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art History

16th Century Miniature Boxwood Carvings That Fit in the Palm of Your Hand

January 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photo by Craig Boyko

Carved the size of a palm or smaller, these miniature boxwood carvings featuring religious iconography from the early 16th century have long been a mystery to researchers in the field. It is believed that the entire body of work was created during a 30-year window between 1500 and 1530, somewhere in Flanders or the Netherlands.

The tiny altarpieces, rosaries, and prayer beads are each produced from a single boxwood fragment, incorporating pins smaller than a grass seed that hold the pieces together. Using micro CT scanning and Advanced 3D Analysis Software, curators and conservators of Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures an exhibition at The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rijksmuseum have gained new insight into the materials and subject matter of each boxwood carving.

Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures will showcase AGO’s collection along with 50 other loaned pieces from other museums and private collections, including some rare carvings that have never been seen in North America. One work, the eleven-bead Chatsworth Rosary (c. 1509-1526), was owned by King Henry VIII and his wife Catherine of Aragon. You can tour the full exhibition yourself at the AGO through January 22, at the Met Cloisters on February 21, 2017, or when the exhibition makes its last stop at the Rijksmuseum on June 15, 2017.

You can also follow AGO on their journey to discovering the mystery behind the boxwood miniatures in the video below, as well as see detailed images from the entire collection on AGO’s website. (via The History Blog)

Photo by Ian Lefebvre

Photo by Craig Boyko

Photo by Ian Lefebvre

Photo by Craig Boyko

 

 



Art

Stones Carved to Appear Like Wrinkled Fabrics by José Manuel Castro López

December 13, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Artist José Manuel Castro López works with rocks both large and small to transform hard surfaces into gentle fabric-like creases. Each sculpture begins as a regular piece of quartz or granite which he delicately grinds down to reveal peculiar wrinkled shapes, as if the rock had always existed this way. You can see many more of his recent works in this gallery.(via Ignant)

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Art

A Miniature Landscape of Elephants Carved From the Tip of a Pencil by Cindy Chinn

July 1, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist Cindy Chinn (previously) recently created a commissioned work for the California-based Epiphany Elephant Museum, a miniature graphite carving of a family of elephants. The piece, titled “Elephant Walk,” features the animals on the tip of a carpenter’s pencil alongside trees that are dotted to imitate foliage. To accurately carve the minuscule materials, Chinn utilizes a magnifying lamp and trinocular microscope. If you are interested in commissioning a piece, or would like to see her other carvings, she has works for sale on her Etsy store.

You can see more images of her miniature carved works on her Facebook, blog, and website. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Art Music

An Antique Piano Cut in Half, Connected Only by a Wishbone

June 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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We’ve long marveled at artist Maskull Lasserre's masterful ability to carve anatomical details into everyday objects. One of his recent sculptures, titled Improbable Worlds, is no exception. For this piece the Canadian artist split an old upright piano in two, slicing through every last component leaving only a single point of connection: a tiny wishbone carved from the wooden piano back. The visual tension created by the piece is astounding, let alone the head-scratching question of how he technically accomplished it, knowing that if the weight of the piano shifted just slightly the piece would snap in half.

You can see more of Lasserre’s recent artworks in his portfolio.

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