clay

Posts tagged
with clay



Craft Food

Tiny Trays Serve Up Delicious Morsels in Miniature Spreads by Mahnaz Miryani

November 18, 2022

Kate Mothes

A photograph of miniature foods.

All images © Mahnaz Miryani, shared with permission

Tehran-based artist Mahnaz Miryani has been fascinated by puzzles since she was a child. In her miniature culinary arrangements, she channels a love for fitting little pieces together into satisfying compositions. Tiny trays transport pastries, eggs, cakes, and other dainty morsels, including a baking surface with an apple pie in the making. Miryani sculpts each itty-bitty croissant or cup of coffee from polymer clay, adding texture to create realistic details. Then, it’s time to bake! Once the clay has hardened in the oven, she adds colorful details in acrylic paint and soft pastels. The next item she plans to add to her menu is a bowl of spaghetti and meatballs.

Miryani is also the founder of a platform dedicated to miniature foods called Yummy Miniature. You can follow more of her work on Instagram.

 

A photograph of miniature foods.

A photograph of miniature foods.

Two photographs of miniature foods.

A photograph of miniature foods.

A photograph of miniature foods.

A photograph of miniature foods.

A photograph of miniature foods.

 

 

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Art

Symbols and Colorful Motifs Inscribe Tomàs Barceló’s Fragmented Steampunk Sculptures

November 14, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

“Auk Morai R,” clay, plaster, and resin. All images © Tomàs Barceló, shared with permission

Following a series of fantastic steampunk busts, Tomàs Barceló continues to sculpt figures that infuse classical foundations with otherworldly, mechanical visions. The Cala Millor, Mallorca-based artist shapes faces and limbs from fragmented shards of ceramic and plaster, which are often cloaked with symbols, patterns, and filigree rendered in shellac, acrylics, and chalk and iron paints. Barceló is broadly concerned with establishing a unique presence in his works, which tend to confront the viewer with a steadfast stare or calm, spiritual aura, and each sculpture appears as a relic from a futuristic past.

The artist generously shares a timelapse of the process behind the polychromatic tomb-like work “Naar Keizar” shown below, along with other behind-the-scenes glimpses on YouTube. Find a larger archive of his sculptures on his site and Instagram.

 

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

Detail of “Auk Morai R,” clay, plaster, and resin

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

“Morai Kera,” clay plaster, resin, shellac, chalk paint, acrylics, and iron paint

A detail photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

Detail of “Erin Llull”

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

“Naar Keizar,” clay, resin, shellac, and acrylic paint

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

Detail of “Morai Kera,” clay plaster, resin, shellac, chalk paint, acrylics, and iron paint

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

Detail of “Naar Keizar,” clay, resin, shellac, and acrylic paint

A photo of a figurative sculpture painted with colorful patterns

“Erin Llull”

 

 



Craft

Delicate Slivers of Air-Dry Clay Form Breezy, Idyllic Landscapes by Alisa Lariushkina

November 7, 2022

Kate Mothes

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

All images © Alisa Lariushkina, shared with permission

One can almost feel the breeze as it swishes through grasslands and ripples streams in the swirling textures of artist Alisa Lariushkina’s bucolic landscapes. Based in Vilnius, the artist draws inspiration from earlier works or from photographs that people share with her. Composed from delicate slivers of air-dry clay, she assembles pieces that subtly shift in size and hue to reflect the sun at different times of day, meadows and flowers that sway in the wind, and the atmosphere of distant mountains. You can follow Lariushkina’s work on Instagram.

 

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.  A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A detail of a landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

A detail of a landscape composition by Alisa Lariushkina made from pieces of air-dry clay.

 

 



Art Documentary

A Powerful Documentary Captures the Life and Work of Artist Yvonne Shortt Who is Legally Blind

September 8, 2022

Grace Ebert

Retinitis pigmentosa is a rare genetic disease that breaks down the retina and causes vision loss as it progresses. Like many with the condition, Yvonne Shortt was diagnosed as a child when she realized that her sight was different from those in her family when they wandered into dark movie theaters or looked at the stars at night, and she struggled to do the same.

Now legally blind as an adult, Shortt cultivates a visual art practice that involves shaping figurative busts from clay, moss, grasses, and other natural materials. “I make a face of a little girl, and I make that face for hours until I feel her breathing. I thought, if I can’t see, will I have that connection with it?” she says of experiencing her vision slowly diminish. “But there’s the tactility, the wetness of the clay, how it dries. I realized that I can still make objects even with my eyes closed.”

Filmmaker James Robinson dives into Shortt’s story in one part of the documentary series Adapt-Ability, produced by The New York Times. The film chronicles how Shortt experienced the progression of the disease and offers a simulation of what the world looks like from her body as she gradually loses clarity and her peripheral vision. Robinson explains:

Unlike the stereotype of the blind living in a lightless world, Ms. Shortt, like most other legally blind people, lives a nuanced existence between those who see well and those who can’t see a thing… She can see some things some of the time, depending on various factors, including the amount of ambient light, her distance from the object and the object’s location in her field of vision.

Although the condition has necessitated life adjustments like the use of a white cane, Shortt has come to understand her limitations as a benefit to her art, her other senses, and her ability to find compassion for those around her. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 

 



Art

Fantastical Hybrid Characters by Toco-Oco Imagine the Mysteries of Human Nature

August 17, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Toco-Oco

Playfully curious, a troupe of hybrid characters dreamed up by the Brazil-based Toco-Oco (previously) has an inclination for the mythical. Figures sporting feathered suits and wolves cradling human heads are imbued with mystery, and together, the otherworldly cast becomes a metaphor for the varied, emotional, and sometimes bewildering nature of human existence. Toco-Oco, which is helmed by Lara Alcântara and Guilherme Neumann, sells prints and the small sculptures, which are made of wax, wood, and clay, in its shop, although the works sell out incredibly quickly, so be sure to keep an eye on Instagram for information about new releases.

 

 

 



Art

A Diverse Array of Textures Cloak Abstract and Figurative Ceramics by Artist Carlos Cabo

July 18, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Carlos Cabo, shared with permission

More than form or color, texture is what preoccupies Carlos Cabo as he sculpts. The Spanish artist, who lives and works in Salinas, is drawn to the tactile qualities of clay and the possibilities inherent in its malleability. Texture “is what gives (a work) personality, what individualizes it, and essentially differentiates it from other similar pieces,” he says. “I would dare to say that the texture is more than the skin of the piece. It is the representation of its genetic code.”

From masses of the natural material sourced from the countryside, he shapes tall, slender figures wearing pocked gowns, abstract pieces that twist upward, and minimal owl-like creatures, some with sleek feathers and others with rough, bumpy plumage. Each ceramic piece is carefully molded, fired, and covered in terra sigillata, the lustrous clay slip coating that functions similarly to a glaze while not masking the texture of the sculpture’s surface.

In a note to Colossal, Cabo shares that his desire to vary the tactile parts of his practice stems from his childhood. He explains:

I grew up in a rural environment, in which we children spent a lot of time outdoors, in permanent contact with endless objects that served to accumulate a lot of tactile experiences in my memory. On the other hand, in my town, there was no electricity during the day. This came to the houses when it got dark and, sometimes, well into the night, which forced us to wander around it using our sense of feeling and touch… I came to know all the imperfections of the walls, the geometry of the doors, and the location of things.

To explore more of Cabo’s body of work, visit his site and Instagram.