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Art

Dream Worlds Imagined in Contorted Clay Portraits by Johnson Tsang

February 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Remembrance”

Johnson Tsang (previously) continues to create spectacularly emotive ceramic sculptures of the human face. The Hong Kong-based artist’s latest series, Lucid Dream II, features surreal contortions that squish, wring, melt, and stretch. Titles like “Remembrance,” “Extrication,” and “Unveiled” suggest an exploration of the liminal space between the conscious and subconscious, in addition to the self and other. Tsang uses plain, unglazed clay, eschewing typical lifelike details such as color, hair, and apparel, to focus the viewer’s attention on the universally-relatable expressions of each of his imagined subjects. You can see more of the sculptor’s completed and in-progress work on Instagram and Facebook.

“Here and There”

“Here and There” detail

“Work in Progress”

“Under the Skin”

“Love in Progress”

“Falling in Love”

“Unveiled”

“Lawful Custody”

“Extrication”

 

 



Animation

Wide-Mouthed Heads Consume and Absorb a Range of Mutable Forms in the Short Film “Distortion”

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish animator and sculptor Alexander Unger (previously here and here) creates stop motion animations and tutorials on his Youtube channel titled Guldies. His most recent claymation, Distortion, follows the transformation of eight dice-sized blue cubes into a series of limbs, puddles, and wide-mouthed heads that consume and absorb the previous clay form in rapid succession. Although captivating to watch, the sound effects add another dimension to the short film. Each metallic ting or watery bloop tricks the eye into believing the clay is harder or softer than it appears on screen. Watch out for a twist ending that ties the whole piece together as a beautiful looping narrative. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Design

An Intricate Circuit Board Formed with Thousands of Miniature Modeling Clay Pieces by Tim Easley

May 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All images via Tim Easley

All images via Tim Easley

For a recent commission from indie record label Albert’s Favourites, London-based designer Tim Easley created an intricate circuitboard completely out of plasticine clay. The finished work measures approximately 20 inches square (50 x 50 cm) and took the artist about 80 hours to complete. He then photographed the clay circuitboard with birds-eye and angled aerial views to create the final album artwork.

Easley created the project for the London-based electronic music duo Modified Man. He describes the work, which envisions an abstracted future perspective on today’s technology, on Behance:

Easley created the project for the London-based electronic music duo Modified Man.He describes the work, which envisions an abstracted future perspective on today’s technology, on Behance: “The idea behind the cover was how the modified men of the future may make artwork out of ancient circuit boards, not quite understanding what they were for because of their crude appearance.”

You can see more from Easley on Behance, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

 

 



Art Craft

Discarded Objects are Beautified with Colorful Coral-Like Growths by Stephanie Kilgast

April 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Stephanie Kilgast takes discarded objects like tin cans, jam jars, and old cameras and embellishes them with vibrant amalgamations of coral-like growths. The artist honed her detail-oriented skills by making hyperrealistic miniature food, and she continues to use polymer clay and hand tools to craft her artworks. Mushrooms, crystals, beetles, and abstract forms sprout from the everyday objects that Kilgast sources from thrift stores and trash cans.

In an artist statement on her website, she describes her work as “an ode to life, where plants and fungi meet insects, animals and minerals. These encounters are growing in a colorful swirl of diversity, and the erratic growth develops on found objects, in a dialogue between humanity and nature.”

Kilgast, who is based in France, often documents her creative process in videos on InstagramYouTube, and Facebook. In addition to sharing her work with her large online audience, the artist exhibits widely, and was most recently a part of the themed group show “Monochrome” at Art Number 23 in London.

 

 

 

 



Animation

Abstract Claymation Videos by Romane Granger Capture the Small Details of Ocean Life

March 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In a pair of teaser videos for singer Stevanna Jackson, animator Romane Granger (previously) uses carefully modeled clay to suggest the complex ecosystem of life on the ocean’s floor. In Ocean Blues #1 and #2, the coils and folds of clay shift in tune with Jackson’s music as waves, flower-like designs and human characters emerge from the sea. Granger is an animation student at L’École nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. You can see more of her work on Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Intimately Cupped Hands Cast Inside Clay Bricks by Dan Stockholm

December 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

By Hand is one of several pieces by Dan Stockholm that explores the process of making an object by capturing its performative actions within the work. For this particular installation Stockholm placed negative plaster casts of his cupped hands into a series of red clay bricks that vary in how much they reveal. Some objects showcase both hands, while others only hint to a sliver of a finger or palm.

The positions of the cupped hands mimic gestures Stockholm made during a 2013 performance in which he touched every inch of his father’s house after his death. The intimate moments now embody their own structure, the abstract shape of his father’s home reincarnated through gesture.

The work was exhibited at Künstlerhaus Bethanien last spring for his solo exhibition HOUSE. You can view more of Stockholm’s sculptural works on his website.

 

 



Art

Temporal Floral Structures Formed From Unfired Clay by Phoebe Cummings

November 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Phoebe Cummings works primarily with unfired clay to create floral arrangements that are both performative and temporal. The malleable sculptures last only as long as the exhibition, and are made on-site to specifically respond to their temporary environment. The works’ forms are inspired by the natural world as well as botanical illustrations, yet their colors remain the monochromatic shade of raw clay.

The UK-based artist studied Three-Dimensional Crafts at the University of Brighton, and completed her MA in Ceramics & Glass at the Royal College of Art in 2005. Cummings has participated in several residencies across the UK and USA, including the Kohler Co. factory in Wisconsin and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Cummings was just awarded the BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour Craft Prize, in partnership with the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Crafts Council. You can take a behind-the-scenes peek into her practice on her Instagram. (via Patternbank Blog)