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Art

Temporal Floral Structures Formed From Unfired Clay by Phoebe Cummings

November 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Phoebe Cummings works primarily with unfired clay to create floral arrangements that are both performative and temporal. The malleable sculptures last only as long as the exhibition, and are made on-site to specifically respond to their temporary environment. The works’ forms are inspired by the natural world as well as botanical illustrations, yet their colors remain the monochromatic shade of raw clay.

The UK-based artist studied Three-Dimensional Crafts at the University of Brighton, and completed her MA in Ceramics & Glass at the Royal College of Art in 2005. Cummings has participated in several residencies across the UK and USA, including the Kohler Co. factory in Wisconsin and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Cummings was just awarded the BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour Craft Prize, in partnership with the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Crafts Council. You can take a behind-the-scenes peek into her practice on her Instagram. (via Patternbank Blog)

 

 



Animation Art

A Mesmerizing Experimental Claymation Short by Romane Granger

September 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

In this captivating short animated work, Romane Granger, a student at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, weaves an abstract narrative from clay and sand. The work begins as a flat plane, showcasing a field of flowers in constant death and rebloom. Halfway through the piece, which is synced to Yasuaki Shimizu’s Utsukushiki Tennen, a large mountain erupts to consume the array of flora, throwing the film into three dimensions. The extremely unique piece was an official selection at this year’s Ottawa International Animation Festival and the Festival du film de Savigny. You can look behind-the-scenes at Granger’s animated works on Instagram and Vimeo.

 

 



Art Craft

Three-Dimensional Hoop Embroidery Accented With Clay by Justyna Wołodkiewicz

June 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Justyna Wołodkiewicz mixes embroidery with abstract clay forms in order to produce three-dimensional works that spring from traditional hoops. The pieces weave together bold threads with equally bright polymer clay shapes, creating multi-textured surfaces from the diverse materials.

The artist typically starts with a miniature sketch before embarking on molding the clay structures she wishes to include in each piece, stitching the final clay works into the surface of the embroidered hoop. Wołodkiewicz sells her works on her Etsy shop “Nibyniebo” which means “just like the sky.” You can see more of her sculptural embroidery on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art History

Classic American Ephemera Recreated in Clay by Artist Kristen Morgin

October 4, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Monopoly” (2007) (Collection Kristen L. Morgin, image courtesy of the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Beverly Hills)

Kristen Morgin creates objects that at first seem forgettable. Each piece shows evidence of wear, containing the rust and rips of things that have ceased to be cared for long ago. Despite their appearance of cardboard, tin, and paper, the works, which reflect American culture’s ephemera, are actually created entirely from unfired clay. The records, VHS sleeves, board games, and figurines are all illusions, recreations of mementos lost to time.

Morgin keeps her pieces unfired to retain the natural texture and look of the clay, a material that changes drastically once altered by fire. Like the objects that they imitate, her sculptures are meant to eventually crumble, possibly holding an even shorter lifespan than what they resemble. The content of these works focuses on fantasy versus reality, highlighting celebrity and beauty that has long past, created by a material that is not what it seems.

Morgin’s work is included in the four-artist exhibition “Visions and Revisions: Renwick Invitational 2016” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. through January 8, 2017. (via Smithsonian Mag)

"Sorryland" (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink and marker, 28 x 20 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches (image courtesy of <a href="http://www.anthonymeierfinearts.com/artists/kristen-morgin/slideshow?view=slider#7" target="_blank">Anthony Meier Fine Arts</a>)

“Sorryland” (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink and marker, 28 x 20 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

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“The Repeating Table” (2010), wood, books, toys, records with clay painted counterparts, 45 x 68 x 108 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

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“150 Ways to Play Solitaire” (2010), wood, wire and unfired painted clay, 34 x 34 x 12 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

"Still Life As The Alphabet" (2013), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, wood, 5.5 x 37 x 2 in

“Still Life As The Alphabet” (2013), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, wood, 5.5 x 37 x 2 in (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

"Still Life As A Conga Line" (detail), (2014), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, 18 x 96 inches

“Still Life As A Conga Line” (detail), (2014), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, 18 x 96 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

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“Ecstasy Pyramid” (2016), unfired clay, paint, ink, marker, crayon and graphite, 38 x 37 x 2 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

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“Another Wonderful Day” (2013), unfired clay, pint, ink, crayon, graphite, 12.25 x 12.25 x 0.25 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

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“Space Invader” (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite and wire, 13 3/4 x 16 1/2 x 1/4 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

 

 



Animation

On the Other Side of the Woods: A Stop-Motion Story About a Small Clay Girl Lost in an Artist’s Studio

February 29, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Created in 2014 by Estonian animator Anu-Laura Tuttelberg, On the Other Side of the Woods is a beatfully realized stop-motion fairy tale about a small clay girl lost in a creaky painter’s studio. The film was shot mostly with natural light streaming in from nearby windows causing a gentle flicker that helps subtly denote the passage of time. Tuttelberg tells us that it was her intent to express as much about each character as possible through the materials she used.

The materials for puppets were chosen to express their characteristics. The girl for example is made of moist clay to express her dynamic and free personality. She is always flowing along with any event that she comes across in life. I used real clay for making her, and asked the animator to move the surface of her body in every frame so that it is visible that she is made of soft wet clay. The technique was quite time consuming as the clay deforms easily while animating and I had to make a new puppet for each shot.

On the Other Side of the Woods won numerous festival awards over the last year and was made available online for the first time this morning. Watch the film above and you can see some behind-the-scenes shots here.

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Animation History

The Ballad of Holland Island House: An Animated Short Created by Painting with Clay on Glass

March 30, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Built in the late 1880s, Holland Island House was the last surviving structure on an rapidly eroding island in the Chesapeake Bay. The island’s inhabitants were forced from the island in the 1920s, but this one Victorian structure stood for decades as the land around it disappeared. After numerous attempts to save it, the house finally collapsed into the ocean in October of 2010.

In her stop-motion short The Ballad of Holland Island House, animator Lynn Tomlinson shares the story of the house through an innovative clay-on-glass animation technique. Every single frame was painted by hand with clay and photographed, a medium that lends itself perfectly to depicting ocean currents, memory, and the passage of time. Music by Anna & Elizabeth.

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Art

A Spinning Mosaic of Patterns Drawn with Wet Clay on a Potter’s Wheel

March 24, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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As a person who’s spent more than a few hours at the seat of a potter’s wheel I can attest to the strangely soothing act of doodling around with wet clay sludge (called slip) before or after throwing a pot. As fun as it is, it’s still somewhat surprising to see the act elevated to this level of artistry by Michael Gardner Mikhail Sadovnikov who blurs the line between performance and visual art as he creates pattern after pattern on an empty wheel. (via The Awesomer)

 

 

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