collage

Posts tagged
with collage



Animation

LUFTRAUM: A Disorienting Aerial Collage of Urban Infrastructure by Dirk Koy

June 28, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In his recent short film LUFTRAUM, Basel-based artist Dirk Koy utilized a drone to capture buildings and busy roundabouts from above. These roads and structures were then isolated and stacked to create a perpetually spiraling collage of disorienting urban infrastructure. Koy founded the office Dirk Koy Bild und Bewegung which focuses on experimental films and motion graphics, and over the last few years he has created music videos for Boris Blank and Five Years Older. You can see more of his video mash-ups and edits, such as his playground-based short Time Machine, on Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

A Mural of Swirling Cursors, Dancing Skeletons, and Rainbow Hearts is Set in Motion When Viewed Through a “GIF-iti” App

May 29, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

For the D&AD (Design and Art Direction) festival, recently held in London, Shutterstock commissioned muralist and pattern designer INSA (previously) to create an interactive artwork. When viewed through the graffiti artist’s “GIF-iti” app, the multi-part mural, titled “File Under:Unresolved” springs to life in a looping animation. Multiple working image windows are filled with visual content from Shutterstock’s media library, ranging from cheerful Lisa Frank-esque rainbow hearts to a stock gif of a businessman smashing his laptop. Nestled among the working image windows are three file folders, constantly hovered over by an arrow cursor.

In a statement INSA wrote, “I hope that the work might make creatives consider how they feel about themselves, their work, the endless deadlines and their use of time in life.” This augmented mural is far from INSA’s first: the U.K.-based artist shares his animated artwork on Instagram and Tumblr. (via Fast Company)

 

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Art

Advanced Technologies Hide Below the Surface in New Three-Dimensional Collages by Dustin Yellin

May 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Astronauts Building a Rocket Under the Sea" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16" x 16" x 8.25" and 16" x 15.875" x 8.125"

“Astronauts Building a Rocket Under the Sea” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16″ x 16″ x 8.25″ and 16″ x 15.875″ x 8.125″

Brooklyn, New York-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) preserves three-dimensional photo collages in glass bricks to create what he describes as “frozen cinema.” Some of his more recent works feature landscapes only slightly more dramatic than our own natural and manmade world, often with groups of subjects working together to construct grand machines. Humans unite to build rockets under waterfalls and the sea, while a time machine is secretly constructed underneath a car junkyard. No matter the subject, each work explores our fate within the Anthropocene and the lasting impression we will leave on the Earth. You can see more of his scenes encased in glass on his website and Instagram.

"Unicorn Disc" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16" x 16" x 8.25"

“Unicorn Disc” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16″ x 16″ x 8.25″

Detail of "Unicorn Disc" (2017)

Detail of “Unicorn Disc” (2017)

"Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall" (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 48.25" x 17.875" x 18.75"

“Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall” (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 48.25″ x 17.875″ x 18.75″

Detail of "Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall" (2018)

Detail of “Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall” (2018)

"Ceremony to Build a Rocket on Floating Disc" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16" x 16" x 8.25"

“Ceremony to Build a Rocket on Floating Disc” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16″ x 16″ x 8.25″

"Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 15.875" x 15.875" x 7.75"

“Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 15.875″ x 15.875″ x 7.75″

Detail of "Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain" (2017)

Detail of “Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain” (2017)

Detail of "Group Sisyphus" (2017)

Detail of “Group Sisyphus” (2017)

"Group Sisyphus" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16" x 16" x 8"

“Group Sisyphus” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16″ x 16″ x 8″

"The Peace of Wild Things" (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 48.25" x 18" x 17.5"

“The Peace of Wild Things” (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 48.25″ x 18″ x 17.5″

 

 



Photography

Jarring Juxtapositions of Prosperity and Conflict by Uğur Gallenkuş

May 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Bottom photograph: Paula Bronstein

Turkish artist Uğur Gallenkuş uses split images to emphasize the grave differences between war-torn countries and privileged, peaceful societies. Gallenkuş often specifically references Western visual culture in his juxtaposed images, such as Christian iconography of the Madonna and child, and the Instagram aesthetic of the ice cream cone portrait. In each composite image, the Istanbul-based artist pairs a carefully matched slice of prosperity with jarring documentation of conflict and poverty to show what occupies the attention and defines the experiences of people around the world, depending on where they live.

Gallenkuş has been creating these divided images for several years as a personal project, and has garnered global attention for his work, which he shares with nearly half a million followers on Instagram. In a recent interview with Juxtapoz, the artist explained,  “If we want to live in peace and trust, we must have healthy knowledge and empathy. Wrong and biased information and hatred make these problems even worse.”

Lefthand photograph: Abd Doumany

Lefthand photograph: Mario Tama

Lefthand photograph: Shakib Rahman / Righthand photograph: Frederic J. Brown

Righthand photograph: Yasin Akgul

Lefthand photograph: Khalid Mohammed

 

 

 



Art

Imitation China Plates and Layered Cut Paper Animals Explore the Sculptural Potential of Paper in a New Exhibition at Paradigm Gallery

April 19, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Miniature paper work by Nayan and Vaishali, all images courtesy of Paradigm Gallery

Miniature paper work by Nayan and Vaishali, all images courtesy of Paradigm Gallery

Subtle manipulations, intricate cuts, and ornate collages are a few of the various ways contemporary artists are transforming paper today. These techniques and more are displayed in the upcoming exhibition pa•per, curated by Paradigm Gallery co-founder Jason Chen and featuring artists outside of the gallery’s roster. The list includes Nayan and Vaishali (previously), the India-based duo who spend 4-6 hours a day crafting precisely sliced and painted miniature animals. Kent-based artist Sally Hewitt creates the illusion of a body’s impression on cartridge paper by gently prodding the material with needles, bodkins, and embossing tools. Other included artists like Danielle Krysa and Lizzie Gill use collage, while Rosa Leff cuts traditional patterns and imagery found on fine china into cheap paper plates. The exhibition, hosted at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, opens on April 26 and runs through May 18, 2019.

Danielle Krysa

Danielle Krysa

Lizzy Gill

Lizzie Gill

Sally Hewitt

Sally Hewitt

Nayan and Vaishali

Nayan and Vaishali

Rosa Leff

Rosa Leff

Albert Chamillard

Lucha Rodríguez

Lucha Rodríguez

Daria Aksenova

Daria Aksenova

 

 



Art Illustration

Atmospheric Collages by Art Duo ‘Frank Moth’ Combine Elements from the Past and Future

March 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Bloom" (2017)

“Bloom” (2017)

Frank Moth is the nom de plume of an anonymous Athens-based art duo. Together the pair creates atmospheric collages that combine elements from vast expanses such as oceans, deserts, and the universe at large. The artists combine these scenic elements with decades-old images of men and women, simultaneously dating the collages and giving them a futuristic feel. Because of this push and pull between the past and present, the pair refer to their work as “nostalgic postcards from a distant but at the same time familiar future.” You can see more of the collaborative’s collage work on Moth’s Instagram and Tumblr, and shop prints in their Society6 store.

"You Will Find Me There Standing Whenever You Want" (2016)

“You Will Find Me There Standing Whenever You Want” (2016)

"Waiting for the Cities to Fade Out Waiting for You" (2015) left, "We Chose This Road My Dear" (2015) right

“Waiting for the Cities to Fade Out Waiting for You” (2015) left, “We Chose This Road My Dear” (2015) right

"Roots" (2019)

“Roots” (2019)

"Lost in Your Memories" (2016)

“Lost in Your Memories” (2016)

"Light Explosions in Our Sky" (2014)

“Light Explosions in Our Sky” (2014)

 

 



Art

Elaborately Collaged Newspapers by Myriam Dion Transform Current Events into New Visual Narratives

December 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In the patient hands of Myriam Dion (previously), daily newspapers become timeless works of art. The artist reads each newspaper she transforms from cover to cover before envisioning an entirely new visual identity for the inexpensive yet information-dense material. Using a combination of collage, X-ACTO knife cutting, gilding, and painting, Dion forms intricate patterns, often adorning and emphasizing a single image across the broadsheet.

“By crafting thoughtful mosaics out of the world events, I question our appetite for sound-bite news and sensational art, showing the quiet power of a patient hand and an inquisitive eye,” she explains in an interview with Huffington Post. “I am creating a new newspaper that can be interpreted, that encourages people to think more deeply about the news that we consume too easily.”

In addition to working with current events, Dion also engages vintage printed materials, like a 1953 issue of The Gazette that lauds a young Queen Elizabeth, and fact sheets from mid-century beauty pageant contestants. The artist is based in Montreal, Quebec, where she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Quebec. Dion is represented by Division Gallery, and her work will be part of the group exhibition “Pushing Paper” at Museum London in London, Ontario from January 26 to May 12, 2019. You can see more of her work on her website.

 

 

A Colossal

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Sailing Ship Kite