embroidery

Posts tagged
with embroidery



Art

Feminine Hairstyles From Popular Folklore Embroidered on British and American Currency by Noora Schroderus

July 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Finnish artist Noora Schroderus embroiders classic hairstyles inspired by well-known female characters of European folktales and Disney films onto the leaders featured on US and British currency. The hairstyles are reminiscent of Cinderella’s ball-ready bouffant or Rapunzel’s endless braid and examine the passive beauty associated with feminine characters in contrast with the masculine power of wealth. The banknotes also explore aspects of industrialization, pinning the production of money and capitalism against the slow process and gesture of handmade embroidery. You can see a wider range of hairstyles sewn on currency from around the world on Schroderus’s website.

Exhibition view from Serlachius Museum Göstä, Mänttä Finland

 

 



Art

Richly Textured Portraits of Native Arctic Residents and European Explorers by Preta Wolzak

May 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In her series Ma Petite Inuite and Everybody Needs A Hero, artist Preta Wolzak explores the parallel histories of people on the earth’s poles. Her colorful portraits are constructed of leather, embroidery thread, wool, and glow-in-the-dark twine, combined to depict faces of both the first people of the North and 19th century explorers of the South, including Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton.

Wolzak shares with Colossal that she uses her artistic practice to draw attention to the impact that tourism, manifest destiny, and climate change has had particularly on both the North and South Poles. Our exploratory interest in these seemingly far-off places has direct impacts on the people who live close to the Arctic and Antarctic.

Wolzak is represented by Rademakers Gallery in Amsterdam, where her solo show opens on May 24 and is on view until June 17, 2018. You can see more of her work on Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft Photography

Joyful Embroidered Photographs Embellished with Colorful Floral Motifs by Aline Brant

May 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Aline Brant celebrates people of varying ages and genders in her lovely embroidered photographs. Brant starts with a black and white photograph featuring an individual person, who is then embellished with swirling strands of flowers, leaves, and vine-like lines. The brightly colored embroidery stands in contrast to the subdued grayscale tones of the photographs, highlighting the human figure while also standing alone as an eye-catching visual motif. Brant shares her work, interspersed with personal musings, on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

 

 



Art Craft

Inner Worlds Revealed in Michelle Kingdom’s Intricate Narrative Embroideries

May 2, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

The Granting Of Wishes

Los Angeles-based embroidery artist Michelle Kingdom (previously) expresses unspoken emotions in scenes composed of women surrounded by plants or animals. Kingdom often depicts a solo protagonist, or multiple characters engaging in ritualistic activities. Her imaginative scenarios often blur the role of nature as part of the story, or simply use it as a decorative element.

Kingdom uses long stitches of thread in layered tonal colors to create texture and volume. The artist describes her work in a statement on her website: “I create tiny worlds in thread to capture elusive yet persistent inner voices. Literary snippets, memories, personal mythologies, and art historical references inform the imagery; fused together, these influences explore relationships, domesticity and self-perception.”

Kingdom has a solo show ‘Dearer than Truth’ at Foley Gallery in New York, on view through May 13th. You can see more of her work on Instagram.

Indelible

This Empress Dream

Leaving No Relics

The Stars Were Long Gone

There Was No Going Back

As Plain As Day

We Grow Rings

The Height Of Folly

Even Now… Even Sleeping

 

 



Art Photography

Joana Choumali Embroiders iPhone Photographs as a Healing Meditation

April 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Joana Choumali‘s photographic series Ça va aller translates to “It’s going to be fine,” a common phrase used by people in Côte d’Ivoire to casually reassure each other, even after a deeply traumatic event. Choumali started the project less than a month after the March 2016 Grand-Bassam terrorist attack, when three gunman opened fire at a beach resort an hour away from her home in Abidjan. The images in the series are all taken on her iPhone, and appear more like snapshots rather than portraits. She wanted the subjects to look natural, as if she was scanning the city.

“Three weeks after the attacks, the atmosphere of the little town changed,” said Choumali in a statement about the series. “The sadness is everywhere. A ‘saudade,’ some kind of melancholy. Most of the pictures show people by themselves, walking in the streets or just standing, sitting alone, lost in their thoughts. And empty places.”

Choumali explains that she began embroidering the images on printed canvas as a way to cope with her own sadness. The meditative process has now become engrained in her daily practice as a way for the photographer to relax and concentrate. The brightly colored threads serve as the sentiments she cannot express verbally, and a way to witness and acknowledge the denied trauma of the Grand-Bassam people.

“This work is a way to address the way Ivorian people deal with psychological suffering,” said Choumali. “In Côte d’Ivoire, people don’t discuss their psychological issues, or feelings. A post-traumatic [shock] is considered as weakness or a mental disease. People don’t talk about their feelings, and each conversation is quickly shortened by a resigned “Ça va aller.”

Select pieces from Ça va aller will be exhibited later this spring at the 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair in New York City. You can see more work from the Ivory Coast-based photographer on her website and Instagram. (via It’s Nice That and African Digital Art)

 

 

 



Art History

A Seamstress’s Autobiographical Text Embroidered Onto Her 19th-Century Straitjacket

April 3, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

German seamstress Agnes Richter (1844–1918) was a patient at the Heidelberg Psychiatric Clinic during the 1890s. While held at the asylum she would densely embroider her standard issue straitjacket, stitching the object with words, phrases, and diaristic entries in deutsche schrift, an old German script. The layers of language make it difficult to distinguish a beginning or end to the writing, and only fragmented phrases have been deciphered from the jacket such as “I am not big,” “I wish to read,” and “I plunge headlong into disaster.”

The object is a part of the Prinzhorn Collection at the University of Heidelberg Psychiatric Clinic, named after collector and psychiatrist Hans Prinzhorn. The collection contains over 5,000 paintings, wooden sculptures, sketches, and other art-based ephemera from patients at the hospital, collected by the psychiatrist during the early 20th-century. This vast collection of work made by psychiatric patients has had a major influence on a modern understanding of “outsider art,” or the artwork created by self-taught artists who have had little to no contact with the mainstream art world.

Over a century later, the jacket remains a powerful item, a lasting object that showcases how one woman transformed a sterile and impersonal garment into a rich record of her life’s journey. (via #WOMENSART)

Update: Sources vary as to whether this article of clothing was Richter’s straitjacket, a regular jacket, or part of a non-restrictive institutional uniform.

Left image via This Is Not Modern Art tumblr, right image via The Lulubird

 

 



Art Craft

Stitched Sculptural Installations of Everyday Objects and Gestures by Amanda McCavour

March 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Toronto-based textile artist Amanda McCavour uses thread and a sewing machine to construct sculptural installations that dance between two and three dimensions. McCavour stitches on a special fabric that dissolves in water to create the surfaces of thread. Through renderings of objects like sofas, kitchen tables, and backpacks, as well as arms and hands engaged in work, she explores connections to home and the fibers of the body. In an artist statement McCavor states she is interested “in thread’s assumed vulnerability, its ability to unravel, and its strength when it is sewn together.”

McCavour holds an MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, and she exhibits widely. Currently, her Floating Garden installation is on display at the Cornell Art Museum in Florida as part of their Flora exhibition, which opens today, March 30th, and is on view through September 9, 2018. Flora also includes Tiffanie Turner (previously), and Miya Ando (previously). You can see more of McCavour’s work on her Facebook page and via Instagram.