embroidery

Posts tagged
with embroidery



Art Craft

Embroidered Women Adorned With Flower-Shaped Tattoos and Leaf-Covered Clothing by Giselle Quinto

July 15, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Amsterdam-based artist Giselle Quinto embroiders the quiet moments that occur as one finds solitude. Quinto presents subjects left alone with just a potted plant or floral background. The works are created with precise black lines that outline a range of hairstyles, from short pixie cuts to a cascade of curls being held casually by a woman’s hand. Color tends to be used sparingly in her designs, often only used as an accent for plants, flowers, lips, and cheeks.

Quinto explains in her bio that her practice “brings an anarchic view to classic embroidery, revisiting old traditions and transforming it in protest for equality, where all have the right to be and live whoever they are.” You can buy your own piece of Quinto’s through her online shop and follow her photo shoots behind-the-scenes on Instagram. (via Brown Paper Bag)

 

 



Art Craft

Radial Circles Embroidered Atop Vintage Photographs Act as Multi-Faceted Color Swatches

July 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Striped circles hover over vintage scenes of natural and built landscapes in embroidered interventions by Natalie Ciccoricco. Using colored threads that perfectly match the tones of the underlying images, Ciccoricco builds radial circles that act as multi-faceted color swatches. Each circle contains more than a dozen different hues of embroidery thread to pick up the nuanced colors present in the vintage images. In one photograph of a desert, the embroidered lines connect to light green cacti, blue sky, and a brown mountain. In another, the varied blue hues of water consume most of the image—and its corresponding circle—while thin black lines pick up the reflection of a boat’s hull.

Ciccoricco, who is Dutch and based in California, is represented by Zukowski Collective. When she is not crafting her embroidered images, she works as a freelance graphic designer and software language translation consultant. The artist shares her work on Instagram, and offers original artwork in her online store as well as some items on Society6.

 

 

 

 

 



Art Craft

Macro Views of British Beaches Become Abstract Textural Embroideries by Emily Botelho

June 21, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Although she doesn’t live right by the ocean, artist Emily Botelho channels her passion for marine landscapes with frequent trips to explore where soil and sea meet. On these trips, she photographs the colors and textures that appear on the rocky waterfront: lichen, seaweed, and small sea creatures all create unique visual patterns. The Manchester, U.K.-based artist then prints her photographs on cotton fabric and embellishes them with long straight stitches, tight beadwork, sea shells, semi-precious stones, and three-dimensional tufts.

Botelho, who creates work under the name Salt Stitches, formerly had a career in the fashion industry, and only took up embroidery about a year ago. In that time she has built a substantial following sharing and selling her hoop-based works on Instagram and Etsy. Botelho is also participating in an online auction with fiber art curator The Fiber Studio, which launches on June 28, 2019.

 

 

 



Art Craft

Precisely Calculated Sculptural Embroideries by Devi Vallabhaneni Turn Beads and Sequins into Fields of Flowers

June 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Garden photographs: Todd Hellman

After a successful career in accounting and higher education entrepreneurship, Chicago-based artist Devi Vallabhaneni reconnected with her youthful passion for creativity and working with her hands. Vallabhaneni now brings together her twin interests in fashion and mathematics in her botanical beadwork. Using an algorithm she created in Excel, and working with haute couture materials like French sequins and beads, she creates dense fields of color and texture. “I innovated embroidery to be sculptural expressions that breathe new life into traditional materials, enabling them to live in unexpected spaces,” the artist explains.

Vallabhaneni works within the constraints of squares and rectangles, and more recently has moved away from abstraction and towards realism with her garden series. Inspired by fashion designer and garden enthusiast Hubert de Givenchy, Vallabhaneni situated her recent artworks in the Hollywood Hills, documenting each piece nestled amongst natural plants and flowers.

Over the past several years, the artist has delved into her creative practice with the same fervor she brought to her business career, and has completed coursework in weaving, textiles, embroidery, and apparel construction. Vallabhaneni is in the current cohort of artists in the Center Program at Chicago’s Hyde Park Art Center and is represented by Galerie Bettina von Arnim in Paris. The artist shares new work along with her wide-ranging visual inspirations on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Industrial Metal Objects Cross-Stitched With Fragile Flowers and Butterfly Designs

June 16, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“Water Lillies”. Photos by Rytis Seskaitis, Aldas Kazlauskas

Lithuanian artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė (previously) continues her practice of employing the traditionally delicate process of cross-stitching to adorn hard metal objects with similarly delicate imagery. Her recent works include a rusty tanker decorated with water lilies and a series of found cans embellished with studies of colorful butterflies and insects. While playing on the irony of the juxtaposition, Severija is also able to tell a story about the objects and their respective histories.

Installed in the public space of Lithuania’s capital Vilnius, “Water Lilies” references motifs by Claude Monet and speaks to the history of the region, the power of water to sustain and destroy, and the changing utilitarian use of objects. Previously used to transport water from natural springs to reservoirs, gardens, baths, and streets, tankers are now more commonly used to transport waste; clean water has become the more rare and expensive substance. Severija’s “Tourist’s Delight” series uses flattened cans found discarded in the Caucasus Mountains as a commentary on the butterfly effect of disturbing natural environments. Though partially decayed, the objects will still outlast the creatures whose images have been stitched into them.

To see more Severija’s socially engaged embroidery, visit the artist’s website.

“Tourist’s Delight”. Photos by Modestas Ežerskis

 

 



Art

Embroidered Women by Klára Hosnedlová Inhabit Installations Inspired by Historic Stage Design

June 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Klára Hosnedlová and Karlin Studios, Prague

Berlin-based artist Klára Hosnedlová builds installations that evoke the feeling of romanticized dressing rooms. Her recent exhibition titled Seated Woman (pictured here) was inspired by the stage design of the bedroom scene in the 1924 Karel Hugo Hilar production of Romeo and Juliet at the National Theater in Prague. Instead of a bed, Hosnedlová has installed a sculptural changing area with wispy, transparent curtains. This gesture merges what happens backstage with the theatrical design of a play, inviting the audience to imagine the intimate and unseen moments that happen just off stage.

Her textured, baby pink walls also act as armatures for detailed embroideries of women in different stages of dress. Heavily layered, long stitches form rich portraits of semi-anonymous figures. Each is thickly bordered with a frame that appears like endlessly looping braids, imitating the idea of getting ready or preparing for a night onstage. You can view more of Hosnedlová installations and embroideries on her Instagram.

 

 



Craft

Venus Fly Traps, Lotus Flowers, and Mushrooms Are Ovaries in Sarah Leonard’s Reproductive Embroideries

June 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Venus Fly Womb”, all photos courtesy of Sarah Leonard

Manchester-based artist Sarah Leonard reimagines female reproductive systems with shimmering sequins and sparkling beadwork. Her embroidery pieces, which she creates under the name Atypical Stitch, are formed on hoops holding bamboo viscose, and they incorporate embellishments and visual puns including moon cycles, venus fly traps, and hourglasses. Leonard shares with Colossal:

Many of my followers and customers find the uterus designs empowering, particularly in a time where female reproductive rights and healthcare are under threat. However, I also try to create pieces which comment on the negative connotations of the uterus symbol—for example the overwhelming pressure that many women feel as a result of society’s expectation for women to be mothers.

The artist began her embroidery practice during the final year of her PhD program as a well-being activity that helped her relax and turn her focus away from her studies. Leonard’ works full-time as a research associate in the field of forensic psychiatry, but she continues to make time for her creative practice. Leonard shares her work on Instagram, where you can also contact her for commissions. In addition to her anatomically-themed pieces, Leonard also recently started “Atypical Kids” for wall decor and wearable designs that appeal to children. (via Juxtapoz)

“Mushromaries”

“Heartaries”

“Angry Foof”

“Peepers”

“Moon Cycle”

“Flowvaries”

“Period of Time”

“Lotusaries”

 

 

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