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Art Design

Vintage Clothing and Found Objects Compose Decorative Masks Designed by Magnhild Kennedy

June 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Magnhild Kennedy, who makes work under the name Damselfrau, creates intricate headpieces and masks that are comprised of both high and lowbrow elements. The London and Oslo-based artist mixes together sequins, vintage clothing scraps, and random materials she finds on the street to compose works that expose minimal elements of the wearer’s face.

The pieces are intended to operate as both art objects and wearable sculptures, and were initially inspired by the elegant clothing seen during her days working at a London vintage shop. As a completely self-taught artist, Kennedy learns techniques as she forms new masks, trouble-shooting new methods alongside her more elaborate designs. You can see more of her wearable works on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Geometric Dresses and Headpieces Created Entirely From Strands of Spaghetti

June 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

French interior designer and visual artist Alice Pegna is attracted to unusual or surprising materials, often using objects outside of their intended purpose. For her project Ex Nihilo, Pegna designed an entire series of geometric dresses and headpieces formed from pieces of uncooked spaghetti. “Spaghetti is basically reserved for cooking, and in the collective imagery it appears fragile. These two reasons pushed me to want to use it,” she explains in her artist statement about the project. “On the other hand I like its features. It has a certain flexibility due to its finesse, while remaining rigid and easy to split.”

Pegna starts each design by forming polygons, which create architectural details while also increasing the strength of the combined pieces. Each sculptural garment is intended to add to the human body, changing the way we see it by obscuring it as little as possible. This is clear in the way that Pegna displays her creations with minimal mannequins and matte backgrounds. The designer and artist wants to highlight the objects on the body while creating a sense of emotion with added effects of light and smoke.

In the future Pegna wishes to scale up her project even further by eliminating the mannequins and manipulating the material in space without support to test its limits. You can see more of her creations by visiting her website and Instagram.

 

 



Design

Performative Rubber Garments by Fredrik Tjærandsen Deflate into Fashionable Skirts and Dresses on the Runway

June 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Photo: Niall McInerney

This week, you’ve most likely seen larger-than-life balloon garments deflating across your Instagram feed. Despite watching time and time again, I don’t seem to get bored with observing the models effortlessly emerge from the top shortly before yanking the rubber object down around their shoulders or waist. The inflated clothing items were designed by Fredrik Tjærandsen, a Norwegian designer who recently won the L’Oreal Professionel Young Talent Award for his 2019 BFA fashion presentation at Central Saint Martins in London. Not only are the dresses performative, they are also rewearable. After the bubble has gone flat, it can either be reinflated or simply worn as a deflated dress.

Initially Tjærandsen wanted to study sculpture during his BFA. His pieces, which he refers to as “bubbles,” reflect this initial interest in sculpture, and additionally have a conceptually tie to his childhood. “I was inspired by my own early childhood memories. I wanted to recreate the fogginess and the ‘mist’ of the memories themselves,” Tjærandsen told Vogue. “The inflated bubbles are about being able to wear an unclear memory. When the bubble emerges onto the catwalk, it’s the dream. The deflation of the bubble visualizes the moment when we realize we have a consciousness.”

You can take a peek at more of Tjærandsen’s rubbery designs on Instagram.

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Photo, R: Niall McInerney

 

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Art Design

Wearable Macramé Sculptures by Sandra de Groot Serve as Soft Headpieces and Armor

June 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Sandra de Groot of Atelier CHAOS creates soft sculptures that are displayed on the human body in the form of elaborate headpieces and ornate armor-like tops. The white macramé works are part of her collection titled kNOTs, which combine elements of craft, sculpture, and architecture in wearable works of art. Each of the ropes that composes her textile forms are made of high quality cotton that allows the pieces to maintain their inherent structure and shape. In a statement, de Groot shares, “the sculptures evolve according to an inner logic that is all mine. Only when the sculpture attains a textile form of attraction and becomes self-contained, I literally let go of the ropes.”

The artist studied at Minerva Art Academy and currently mentors intern artists and designers at her studio. You can see more of de Groot’s hand-knotted works, as well as her photography, on her website and Instagram. (via The Fiber Studio)

 

 



Art

FILTRATE: A Futurist Guerrilla-Style Short Film Shot on an iPhone in Montreal’s Subways

April 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

A new short film titled FILTRATE imagines a future completely saturated with technology, where post-human figures interact using rune-like symbols on immersive social media platforms. The film, directed by Mishka Kornai, was created in the public spaces of Montréal’s underground Metro transit system.

The actors in FILTRATE sport futuristic costumes made by Odette Mattha with shimmering tinsel, long strands of party beads, and textured fabrics that match the setting’s architectural details. Mattha’s designs take advantage of the unique feel of different areas of the Metro system: each station was created by a different architect. Though the filmmakers clearly used the spaces during off-peak times, we can only wonder at the surprise of an unsuspecting commuter.

In a statement on the film’s website, the creators explain their impetus for FILTRATE. “If people retreat into smaller and more idiosyncratic groups, what will the evolutionary trajectory of our society look like? As social groups diverge further and further over the course of generations, when does humanity cease to be just one species?”

The whole process took two years to complete, including 43 days of shooting, six months of costume building, and a year of post-production. Despite its high-tech feel, the creators share that FILTRATE was filmed using just an iPhone 7, a wheelchair, a monopod, and a hand stabilizer. You can take a look behind the scenes in an additional making-of video.

 

 



Art Craft Design

Elaborate Historical Wigs Formed From Copper Wire by Bespoke Sculptor Yasemen Hussein

April 8, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Mixed media bespoke sculptor Yasemen Hussein explains that her art career was originally pointed in the direction of glass, but she found her passion for metalwork while working toward an MFA at Illinois State University. Now well established in her metal practice, Hussein uses copper electrical cable to form elaborate and sinuously lifelike hairdos. The video below, from London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, takes a look inside Hussein’s studio as she created wigs used by the V&A for their exhibit Opera: Passion, Power and Politics.

Hussein works in a coverted stable house in south London, where she manipulates the thin metal cables to simulate elaborate styles ranging from carefully coiled curls to the sweeping fan-like shapes of a geisha’s coif. Rather than creating exact replicas of realistic hair in every wig, Hussein incorporates artistic license to suggest the volume and gesture of each historical look.

In addition to her dramatic wigs, Hussein also creates geometric sculptural installations and delicate copper feathers. You can explore more of the sculptor’s work on her website.

 

 



Art

Stainless Steel Razor Blades Compose Sculptures of Garments and Household Objects by Tayeba Begum Lipi

April 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Recallin 3” (2014), Stainless steel razor blades, 11 x 9.1 x 21.3 inches, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Bangladeshi artist Tayeba Begum Lipi recreates memory-laden objects by connecting thousands of razor blades, transforming the sharp metal tools into tennis shoes, wheels for strollers, sewing machines, sensuous fabrics, and more. Lipi’s sculptures address female marginality and speak most specifically to violence facing women in Bangladesh. The razor blades also references her memories of witnessing the birth of her nieces and nephews as a child growing up in the small town of Gaibandha, where the tool was often used during delivery.

In addition to being an artist, Lipi also founded the Britto Arts Trust in 2002 with her husband Mahbubur Rahman. The organization is dedicated to creating opportunities for other Bangladeshi artists through exhibitions, residencies, and educational activities. Her solo exhibition This is What I Look(ed) Like with Sundaram Tagore Gallery in New York will present several new razor blade sculptures in addition to photography and video works. The show opens on May 2, and runs through June 1, 2019. You can see more of Lipi’s razor blade sculptures, in addition to her collection of safety pin sculptures, on Sundaram Tagore Gallery’s website.

“Recallin 3” (detail) (2014), Stainless steel razor blades, 11 x 9.1 x 21.3 inches, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

“Miles after Miles” (2015), Stainless steel razor blades, 30 x 32 x 11 inches, courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

"The Rack I Remember" (2019), Stainless steel razor blades and stainless steel, dimensions vary photo by Mahbubur Rahman, courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

“The Rack I Remember” (2019), Stainless steel razor blades and stainless steel, dimensions vary photo by Mahbubur Rahman, courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

“The Stolen Dream” (2013), Stainless steel made razor blades, 27.5 x 20 x 37 inches, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

"Let's Take a Break" (2013), Stainless steel made razor blades, stainless steel sheet and water, 64.2 x 28.3 x 18.5 inches, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

“Let’s Take a Break” (2013), Stainless steel made razor blades, stainless steel sheet and water, 64.2 x 28.3 x 18.5 inches, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

“Not For Me 2” (2018), Stainless steel razor blades, 8 x 9 x 6 inches, photo by Mahbubur Rahman, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Still from Unveiling Womanhood (2017), video installation, image courtesy of Sundaram Tagore Gallery

 

 

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