found objects

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with found objects



Art

Gnarled Eyes and Knotted Ears Emerge from Sculptural Portraits Made With Found Wood

June 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Bennett Ewing travels the world collecting pieces of wood from mountains, deserts, beaches, and forests to form expressive sculptural portraits. Using the natural shapes and tones of his found wooden materials, Ewing, who goes by the artist name Eyevan Tumbleweed, builds evocative facial features and wild hairstyles. The artist states, “the sylvan entities and their expressions of thought and emotion portray a glimpse of an otherworldly realm that is not altogether unfamiliar.” You can see more of Ewing’s artwork on his website and Instagram. (via Supersonic Art)

 

 



Art

Metal Utensils Precisely Embedded in Vintage Canning Jars by Jennifer Halvorson

June 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Detail of "Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Glass artist Jennifer Halvorson manipulates vintage canning jars into sculptural portraits tied to memories of making fruit preserves with her family. The antique vessels are each imbedded with utensils that fit perfectly into indentations pressed into the side of the glass objects, and placed in arrangements that connect to her personal narrative.

To create the works, Halvorson slowly warms the jars and then attaches them to a metal rod. After raising the temperature of the pieces, she then carefully torches one area and delicately presses a metal knife, spoon, or fork into the soft interior. “The result of the transformation allows the cutlery to fit perfectly into the jar, showing an active presence within the nostalgic object, but with the absence of a person,” she tells Colossal.

Halvorson has begun to make her own glass jars through rubber molds, wax molding, metal casting, and hot glass blowing molds for her series Preserve Words. Five pieces from this series will be included in the group exhibition Reflections at Momentum Gallery in Asheville, North Carolina from July 1 to August 25, 2018. You can see more of Halvorson’s glass interventions and sculptures on her website.

"Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"What's good for the goose is good for the gander," Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“What’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of "From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Genuine Relation," Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Genuine Relation,” Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Good Luck Impulse," Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Good Luck Impulse,” Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

 

 



Art

Comical Combinations of Ceramic Animals Form Surreal New Figurines

June 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Debra Broz cleverly fuses found ceramic figurines to create comical new animals. From high-fiving horses to boxers with parrot wings, her work exists in the space where familiar and surreal meet. The artist shares with Colossal, “As I look for pieces that match in scale I’m brainstorming: What makes this funny? What makes this strange? How subtle or extreme does an alteration have to be to make someone notice?”

Broz also works as a ceramics restorer, and her professional training and experience gives her the tools to create these seamless amalgamations without making molds or fully recreating the component torsos, heads, and limbs. The Los Angeles-based artist describes her mixed influences of mythology and biology:

I play on the idea of the “mad scientist”, cutting things apart and forming them into something else, like Dr. Moreau or Dr. Frankenstein, but I often find my initial inspiration in the biological world. Some pretty amazing mutations, anomalies and unusual traits have been found in animals over history. “Freaks” have always amazed, but also amused and often frightened people – they are a source of mythology and folklore that is pervasive.

Upcoming projects include a book, scheduled for 2019, and new figurines that branch out to include different materials. You can stay up to date on Broz’s work and see behind-the-scenes on her Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Animation

A Stop-Motion Demo Turns Meta as the Characters Gradually Take Over in ‘Stems’ by Ainslie Henderson

May 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In this meta animation, animator and director Ainslie Henderson (previously) seamlessly transforms a demonstration of his stop motion practice into a film where his miniature puppets take over. The rag tag group of figures break off from Henderson’s narrative to form a slapdash electronic band, utilizing scraps from his workbench to construct instruments from the same electric detritus used to form their own hands, faces, and feet.

“Puppet making often begins by just gathering stuff, like materials that I find attractive like wood, sticks, wire, leaves, flowers, petals, and bits of broken electronics,” says Henderson in the film. “[I use] things that have already had a life are lovely to have as puppets. And then from there you just start improvising. It’s like making music, you just see where it leads you.”

During the process of animating Henderson’s voiceover gradually fades and the viewer realizes his voice is simply a tape recording on screen, and has suddenly been repurposed as an instrument by his animated creations.

Stems has picked up numerous awards since 2016 including a BAFTA in Scotland. You can watch more of Henderson’s work on his Vimeo Channel.

 

 



Art Design Photography Science

Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

April 19, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

SOUP – Refused © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic oceanic debris affected by chewing and attempted ingestion by animals. Includes a toothpaste tube. Additives; teeth from goats.

Photographer Mandy Barker creates deceptively eye-catching images to document the pandemic of plastic debris in the world’s waterways. Barker, who is based in Leeds, UK, works closely with scientists to collect trash from our oceans and beaches on the edges of nearly every continent. One research expedition covered the debris field (stretching to Hawaii) that resulted from Japan’s 2011 tsunami and earthquake; she has also explored the Inner Hebrides in Scotland with Greenpeace.

Barker manipulates her findings in Photoshop, mimicking the manner in which ocean water holds these objects in suspension. Swirls of colors and patterns draw in the viewer’s eye, only to realize that these visually appealing compositions consist of garbage that animals have attempted to chew, plastic pellets, tangles of fishing line, and water-logged soccer balls. The artist describes her work in a statement on her website:

The aim of my work is to engage with and stimulate an emotional response in the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction along with the subsequent message of awareness. The research process is a vital part of my development as the images I make are based on scientific fact which is essential to the integrity of my work.

Barker is currently a recipient of a 2018 National Geographic Society grant. Her work is on display through April 22nd at Mexico City’s Museum of Modern Art, at Photo London Art Fair in May 2018, at the Triennial of Photography in Hamburg in June, 2018, and at BredaPhoto in The Netherlands in September 2018. The artist’s book, Beyond Drifting: Imperfectly Known Animals, was named one of the ten best books of 2017 by Smithsonian. You can see more of Barker’s photographs on her website as well as on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

EVERY… snowflake is different (detail) © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; white marine plastic debris objects collected in two single visits to a nature reserve on the East Coast of England.

EVERY… snowflake is different © Mandy Barker. Ingredients: white marine plastic debris objects collected in two single visits to a nature reserve on the East Coast of England.

Hong Kong Soup:1826 – Lighter © Mandy Barker. Discarded cigarette lighters make reference to our single-use throw away society. The panda, a national emblem of China represents endangered species and faces away from the group symbolizing mother nature turning its back on man’s inability to take ownership of its waste.

Hong Kong Soup:1826 – Spilt © Mandy Barker. 150 tonnes of pre-production plastic pellets (nurdles) spilt from a cargo container during Typhoon Vincente on 23rd July 2012 adds to Hong Kong’s waste issues in its seas and on its beaches.

PENALTY – Europe © Mandy Barker. 633 marine plastic debris footballs (and pieces of) recovered from 23 countries and islands within Europe, from 104 different beaches, and by 62 members of the public, in just 4 months.

PENALTY – The World © Mandy Barker. 769 marine plastic debris footballs (and pieces of) collected from 41 countries and islands around the world, from 144 different beaches and by 89 members of the public in just 4 months.

PENALTY – 24 Footballs © Mandy Barker.

SHOAL – 30.41N, 157.51E © Mandy Barker.Included in trawl: child’s ball and Japanese character – fridge magnet found on the tsunami shoreline. Fishing buoy found in trawl sample, North pacific Ocean

SHOAL 33.15N, 151.15E © Mandy Barker. Included in trawl: tatami mat from the floor of a Japanese home, fishing related plastics, buoys, nylon rope, buckets, fish trays, polystyrene floats, shampoo bottle, caps, balloon & holder, petrol container.

SOUP – Alphabet © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic debris that includes surface text. Ironic random arrangement of 4 pieces of plastic that suggest a warning; ‘Sea’ ‘AND’ ‘HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES’ ‘FOUL’

SOUP: Bird’s Nest © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; discarded fishing line that has formed nest-like balls due to tidal and oceanic movement. Additives; other debris collected in its path.

SOUP – Ruinous Remembrance © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic flowers, leaves, stems, and fishing line. Additives; bones, skulls, feathers, and fish.

SOUP: Turtle © Mandy Barker.

WHERE © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; marine debris balloons collected from around the world.

WHERE (detail) © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; marine debris balloons collected from around the world.

 

 



Photography

The Acrobatic Entanglements of Everyday Objects by Mauricio Alejo

March 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Mauricio Alejo uses everyday objects to create gravity-defying arrangements within his apartment, staging curious interventions and acrobatic feats on his kitchen counters and filing cabinets. Working within the confines of his living space has allowed Alejo to produce ideas as they come, rather than attempt to find the perfect backdrop for his spontaneous compositions.

“I didn’t always like the apartments I was living in, or better put, I didn’t always like the way some of the places I lived translated into the image,” explained Alejo. “They were somehow random and uninteresting, but I knew that it was just natural to photograph right where the ideas were conceived, besides if I started looking for the ‘right’ place to shoot it was going to be a never ending story.”

This immediacy of ideas has become embedded in the photographer’s practice, even with Alejo’s recent move towards studio-based photography. You can see more of his works on his website and Instagram. (via Ignant)

 

 



Art

New Split-View Trash Sculptures by Bordalo II Combine Wood and Colorful Plastics Into Gigantic Animals

July 21, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Bordalo II (previously) has created a series of bisected animals, colorful plastics forming one half of the creature while a combination of wood and metal created a muted mirror on the other side. In one piece the Portuguese artist created a turtle with legs that extend to the ground, appearing to crawl along the side of a a low wall in Moncton, Canada. Other works are more monumental, such as a rabbit that extends two stories in Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal, and a raccoon that seems to dangle head first from a building in Pittsburgh.

The globally-placed installations are the newest evolution of his series Trash Animals, large public works that address the impact our carelessly tossed waste has on the environment around us. You can observe his process for collecting plastic and other waste, as well as follow more of his recent work, on Instagram.