found objects

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Art

Sculptural Assemblages by Thomas Deininger Are Three-Dimensional Tricks of the Eye

September 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Thomas Deininger creates mind-bending optical illusions in his found object sculptural assemblages. The Rhode Island-based artist shares with Colossal that he began creating work from found objects in 1994, when he was “experimenting with the physical qualities of paint and abstraction in both material and imagery.” He continues,

Most of the content I was exploring involved mass consumerism, pop culture and environmental concerns. So really the medium easily became the message. I question beauty, value, and perception and how the three concepts do this little dance that changes how we all relate to the (physical and spiritual) world and how reality is just an illusion we all settle on for a time.

Deininger also explores assemblage in two-dimensional paper collages. Throughout his various mediums, he uses photographs and materials from popular culture, including Barbie dolls and trolls, and has re-created famous paintings by Diego Velázquez and Vincent van Gogh. You can see more of his work on Instagram.

 

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Illustration Photography

Sticks, Seeds, and Petals From the American Southwest Inspire New Insect-Shaped Arrangements by Raku Inoue

July 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Raku Inoue (previously) recently look an extended road trip to several destinations in the American Southwest. During his journey he created a scorpion-shaped arrangement from seeds, sticks, and a pepper found at Antelope Canyon in Arizona, and utilized a fallen cactus segment near Horseshoe Bend as the abdomen in a prickly tarantula. Other works created with found natural elements during Inoue’s trip include a turtle bug, red ant, and centipede.

Recently Inoue created a monochrome stag beetle and Monarch butterfly for a short film in collaboration with CBC Arts. The artist has also begun to explore three-dimensional versions of his found flora creations, building armatures for a gorilla, water buffalo, and tiger. More foraged creations can be found on his Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

Felted Wildlife Perch on Found Objects in Charming Sculptures by Simon Brown

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Simon Brown sources worn-out household tools like brushes and thimbles and turns them into miniature scenes for his felted wildlife. A short, stiff brush becomes a tree branch for a perching owl, and a dense hair brush with swirling bristles forms a meadow for two rabbits. Brown, who is based in Northumbria, United Kingdom, uses needle felting to create his realistic forest creatures. You can see more of his finished and in-progress work on Instagram. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Art Craft

New Miniature Lace Scenes by Ágnes Herczeg Capture Quiet Domestic Moments

July 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Hungarian fiber artist Ágnes Herczeg (previously) continues to create delicate depictions of quiet moments. Formed from colorful lace and found wood, each small scene floats in mid-air and is attached to a piece of wood. Whereas in previous work, Herczeg used unusually shaped wood fragments as part of the figural elements of the scenes, in her more recent pieces the wood acts as a frame. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Gnarled Eyes and Knotted Ears Emerge from Sculptural Portraits Made With Found Wood

June 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Bennett Ewing travels the world collecting pieces of wood from mountains, deserts, beaches, and forests to form expressive sculptural portraits. Using the natural shapes and tones of his found wooden materials, Ewing, who goes by the artist name Eyevan Tumbleweed, builds evocative facial features and wild hairstyles. The artist states, “the sylvan entities and their expressions of thought and emotion portray a glimpse of an otherworldly realm that is not altogether unfamiliar.” You can see more of Ewing’s artwork on his website and Instagram. (via Supersonic Art)

 

 



Art

Metal Utensils Precisely Embedded in Vintage Canning Jars by Jennifer Halvorson

June 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Detail of "Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Glass artist Jennifer Halvorson manipulates vintage canning jars into sculptural portraits tied to memories of making fruit preserves with her family. The antique vessels are each imbedded with utensils that fit perfectly into indentations pressed into the side of the glass objects, and placed in arrangements that connect to her personal narrative.

To create the works, Halvorson slowly warms the jars and then attaches them to a metal rod. After raising the temperature of the pieces, she then carefully torches one area and delicately presses a metal knife, spoon, or fork into the soft interior. “The result of the transformation allows the cutlery to fit perfectly into the jar, showing an active presence within the nostalgic object, but with the absence of a person,” she tells Colossal.

Halvorson has begun to make her own glass jars through rubber molds, wax molding, metal casting, and hot glass blowing molds for her series Preserve Words. Five pieces from this series will be included in the group exhibition Reflections at Momentum Gallery in Asheville, North Carolina from July 1 to August 25, 2018. You can see more of Halvorson’s glass interventions and sculptures on her website.

"Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"What's good for the goose is good for the gander," Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“What’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of "From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Genuine Relation," Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Genuine Relation,” Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Good Luck Impulse," Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Good Luck Impulse,” Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow