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Art Design

Sinuously Curved Benches Made with Thin Strips of Steam-Bent Hardwood

August 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based furniture designer and sculptor Matthias Pliessnig creates sumptuous, twisting benches by steam-bending hardwood. He first developed the process in 2006 while studying wooden boat building techniques at the University of Wisconsin-Madison when he realized that by flipping his boat-inspired creations over, he could use the hollow form as a sturdy bench. Once he has designed his works using Rhinoceros 3-D software, Pliessnig places a strips of wood into a tube filled with hot steam. After ten minutes the wood is malleable enough to bend into his desired shape, but only for about 30 seconds. In eight hours, the wood is fully hardened, and back to its original strength. You can see more of the designer’s undulating furniture on his Instagram.

Photo: Sam Amil

 

 



Design

Tree Stump Patterns Transformed into Bronze and Etched Brass Chairs by Sharon Sides

August 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Flor Chair” (2015), bronze, hand formed acid etched brass, 28.4 x 23/6 x 37.4 inches

Israeli designer Sharon Sides translates natural forms into designed objects by digitally transferring their patterns onto metal. In her series of bronze and acid-etched brass furniture titled Stumps, she utilizes the concentric rings of tree stumps to create richly textured surfaces. As a way to more deeply connect each piece to the object it is inspired by, Sides also keeps the edges of her tables and chairs as close to the stump shapes as possible, and molds the furniture’s legs to appear like twigs or branches. You can watch the design process behind Sides’s series of tree-inspired objects in the video below.

“Flor Chair” (2015), detail

“Flor Chair” (2015), detail

“Flor Chair” (2015), detail

“Flor Chair” (2015), detail

“Lean Coffee Table” (2015), hand formed acid etched brass, bronze, stacked laminated oak, 37 x 37 x 15.75 inches

“Echo Side Table” (2015), hand formed acid etched brass, bronze, stacked laminated oak, 22.75 x 22 x 19 inches

“Echo Side Table” (2015), hand formed acid etched brass, bronze, stacked laminated oak, 22.75 x 22 x 19 inches

 

 



Design

A Series of Japanese Benches Showcase How Pencils Are Made

August 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Images via @pomo

A series of benches that surround the Mitsubishi Pencil headquarters in Tokyo give step-by-step instructions for how the brand’s pencils are made. The concrete and wood furniture dot the perimeter, adding a creative touch to the public space just beyond the company’s walls. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Design

Engraved Wood and Resin Tables Glow With Maps of International Cities

July 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Warsaw-based company Woo Design engraves aerial views of major international cities like New York, Paris, London, and Munich into wooden coffee tables left raw or filled with resin. The designs are built with three layers to give a complete view of each city, with specific segments that reveal its streets, building tops, and waterways. In several of the company’s designs the resin embedded in the table glows a bright blue or green, adding a luminous element to the table’s surface. Woo Design’s tables are currently available through their website and Etsy. You can follow along for more updated cities and designs on their Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

  

 

 



Design

Dachshund Geoffrey Barkington’s Silhouette Immortalized in a Stone Bench

June 18, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

As part of the London Festival of Architecture, a little dog gets a big memorial in the form of a one-ton stone bench. Designed by Patrick McEvoy in memory of a deceased dachshund named Geoffrey Barkington, the bench has been installed in Jubilee Gardens. The Festival of Architecture runs through June 30, 2018, and features over five hundred events around the city of London. (via dezeen)

 

 



Art

Impractical Wooden Furniture Created to Blend Into its Natural Environment

May 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

Hugh Hayden builds furniture not intended for human use, crafting benches and chairs from pieces of wood without removing the original branches or twigs. In these sculptural works the stray forms make it nearly impossible to use the object as a piece of furniture. The shape an Adirondack chair is present, like in his piece The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas, yet its impediments make sitting an uncomfortable challenge.

Hayden’s imbedded branches serve as a camouflage system that explores how his designed objects might blend into a natural landscape. His piece “Brier Patch,” which features six carved school desks, “juxtaposes the organic, unpredictability of the natural world (e.g. undergrowth,
a thicket etc.) with the ordered and disciplined pursuit of education and greater civilization,” he explains. “The branches extending from the desks are entangled and materialize this integration into the landscape or environment, creating a visible, unifying space, that is at once protective and impenetrable.”

His solo exhibition at White Columns runs through June 2, 2018, and is his first in New York City. Hayden recently received is MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University, and his Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University in 2007. You can see more of his sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

"Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

“Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

"Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

“Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

"The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas" (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

“The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas” (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

"Untitled Lexus Dash" (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

“Untitled Lexus Dash” (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

 

 



Art Design

Sisyphus: the Hypnotizing Kickstarter-Funded Kinetic Sand Drawing Machine is Now Available to The Public

April 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Sisyphus, the wildly successful Kickstarter-funded kinetic table designed by Bruce Shapiro (previously), is now available to the public via pre-order. The 2016 project raised $1,924,018 and is, to date, the most-funded campaign in the history of Kickstarter’s art category. The coffee table design includes a bed of sand with a magnetic steel marble that continuously traces programmed patterns through the malleable material. Many of the original designs are meditative mandala-like configurations, but it’s also possible to program the marble to create continuous line drawings or custom messages.

Sisyphus started taking pre-orders this weekend via their website. The table is available in two styles (coffee table or end table) and a variety of metallic and wood finishes. You can also follow the brand’s progress on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 

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