icebergs

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Science

A Nearly Perfect Rectangular Iceberg Spotted in the Antarctic

October 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photo credits: NASA/Jeremy Harbeck

Photo credits: NASA/Jeremy Harbeck

Earlier this month NASA’s cryosphere research division, NASA ICE, posted an image of a peculiar iceberg floating near the Larsen C Ice Shelf. Its perfectly rectangular shape and flat surface sparked the interest of many online, but its form is one that is more common than one might expect. Unlike the recognizable pyramid-shaped icebergs, tabular icebergs split from the edges of ice shelves when they become too brittle. In 2017 an iceberg the size of Delaware broke off of the same arctic ice shelf. The iceberg weighed over a trillion tons, and was one of the largest ever recorded.

The recent image of the tabular iceberg was taken as a part of Operation IceBridge, NASA’s extensive survey of Earth’s Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets, ice shelves, and sea ice. You can see the edge of the perfectly formed tabular iceberg in addition to a slightly less rectangular example in the image taken by IceBridge senior support scientist Jeremy Harbeck below. A GIF of a plane from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center approaching the iceberg can be viewed their Twitter. (via NASA ICE)

 

 



Photography

The Diverse and Rugged Beauty of Nordic Glaciers and Icebergs Captured by Jan Erik Waider

August 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Jan Erik Waider (previously) splits his time between Hamburg, Germany and traveling through the harsh and unpredictable climate of Nordic countries like Greenland, Iceland, and Norway. In each of these locations Waider seeks the most remote and hidden locations, wishing to present rarely seen perspectives of the native landscape to a larger audience. For more than a decade he has captured the monumental beauty of northern glaciers, isolating their color and shape in a way that makes the icy cliffs appear almost extraterrestrial.

In one ongoing series titled Remnants, Waider finds abandoned pieces of icebergs that lay like “stranded whales” on Iceland’s south coast. “Powerful waves wash around them and drag them further ashore, after they drifted aimlessly in the sheltered lagoon for months,” he explains. “The colors tell stories about age and density, and they speak of the history of the volcanoes that let black ash rain down and darkened the skies.”

Waider offers prints of his personal photographs on his website. You can view more images from his northern expeditions on Instagram, Twitter, and Behance.

 

 



Art

Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman

September 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4" (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84" x 144", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4″ (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84″ x 144”, 2016

Zaria Forman (previously here and here) creates incredibly realistic drawings of Antarctica’s icebergs, producing large pastel works that capture the sculptural beauty of the quickly shrinking forms. This past winter, the artist had the opportunity to be side-by-side with the the towering ice shelfs, observing their magnitude aboard the National Geographic Explorer during a four week art residency.

The residency gave her the opportunity to further embody the natural formations, providing a new perspective to create her large-scale drawings.

“Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote,” says Forman. “I hope my drawings make Antarctica’s fragility visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier.”

Forman has a solo exhibition of her work titled Antarctica opening at Winston Wächter gallery in Seattle on September 9 and running through November 4, 2017. You can watch a timelapse of Forman completing her drawing Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4  in the video below. (via Juxtapoz)

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2," Soft pastel on paper, 50" x 75", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2,” Soft pastel on paper, 50″ x 75″, 2016

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1," Soft pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 60″ x 90″, 2016

"Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1," Soft Pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2017

“Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft Pastel on paper, 60″ x 90″, 2017

"Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1," Soft pastel on paper, 84" x 144", 2016

“Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 84″ x 144″, 2016

“Lemaire Channel, Antarctica,” Soft pastel on paper, 44″ x 60″, 2015

"B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper," 72" x 72", 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper,” 72″ x 72″, 2017

"B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2" (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2″ (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60″ x 90”, 2017

 

 



Art

New ‘Eco-Surrealist’ Paintings by Josh Keyes Observe a Post-Human World

August 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Josh Keyes (previously) paints scenes that observe the world at the brink of destruction. His works often focus on polar bears and sharks, one species which will soon lose its home as ice shelves continue to melt, and the other which is poised to take over an Earth undersea. The animals are placed in settings that suggest a post-human existence, such as a pair of fighting horses in front of a beached ship and a solitary brown bear looking over a seemingly empty metropolis.

The hyperrealistic paintings also incorporate graffiti found in unlikely places. Tags cover satellites, icebergs, and even a shark, an allusion to the lengths at which humans are willing to leave their mark.

Keyes’ solo exhibition, Implosion, opens August 5th at Thinkspace Gallery in LA and runs through August 26, 2017. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website. (via Juxtapoz, Arrested Motion)

 

 



Colossal

Colossal x Josh Keyes Print Release: I’ll Melt With You

March 31, 2017

Colossal

We are honored to have worked with Portland-based painter Josh Keyes on an exclusive release of the print edition of his 2016 painting, “I’ll Melt With You,” available now in The Colossal Shop.

Keyes’ ability to paint realistic renderings of our world becomes uncanny when he wields his brush in the name of environmental issues. Animals, rocket ships, and icebergs fall prey to graffiti, leaving the viewer uncomfortably wondering whether this is a painting of the future or a photograph of the present.

“I’ll Melt With You,” originally painted in acrylic on a 12 x 16 inch panel is translated to print form in its full dimensions, with an additional white border for convenient framing, for a final size of 16 x 20 inches. Printed by our friends at ioLabs in Rhode Island on Epson Hot Press Bright 300 gsm archival paper and available exclusively in The Colossal Shop.

 

 



Art

Speculative Paintings of a Graffiti-Covered Earth by Josh Keyes

January 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"Descent" (2016), acrylic on panel, 8"x10"

“Descent” (2016), acrylic on panel, 8″x10″

Josh Keyes‘ newest series features subjects both manmade and natural, their common element being several layers of graffiti that cover a space shuttle, a melting iceberg, and even a whale’s tail. For the last ten years these marks had remained in the background of Keyes’ paintings, adding detail to the supporting elements of the environment rather than being integrated into the subjects of his work.

For Keyes, the decision to place graffiti writing in the foreground questions our relationship to the natural world, and what impact we are undeniably leaving on our planet. The iceberg for instance, is marked with the words, “I’ll melt with you.” This blood red message could be the voice of both the iceberg and the tagger, a warning that we will all be melting if we continue to desecrate the Earth.

“Are there things and places that graffiti should not be?” asked Keyes to Colossal. “Who is to say what surface is to be kept graffiti clean? My personal concern is that this will be a reality some day and speaks to a larger issue of our relationship with the natural world. The satellite and space graffiti hints that even if we colonize other worlds, what mark will we leave? No matter where we go there is evidence of our presence.”

Keyes’ will exhibit his paintings later this year with Thinkspace Gallery in LA. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website.

"Tin Can" (2016), acrylic on panel, 24"x48", all images via Josh Keyes

“Tin Can” (2016), acrylic on panel, 24″x48″, all images via Josh Keyes

"Tin Can" (2016), acrylic on panel, 24"x48"

“Tin Can” (2016), acrylic on panel, 24″x48″

"I'll Melt With You" (2016), acrylic on panel, 12"x18"

“I’ll Melt With You” (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″x16″

"Frontier 2" (2016), acrylic on panel, 12"x16"

“Frontier 2″ (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″x16”

"Frontier" (2015), acrylic on panel, 19"x24"

“Frontier” (2015), acrylic on panel, 19″x24″

 

 



Photography

A Towering Iceberg and Its Shadow Split the World into Quadrants

October 11, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Captured by Canadian photographer David Burdeny in 2007, this amazing photo of a tabular iceberg rising straight out of the Weddel Sea appears to organize the world into four neat quadrants. Titled “Mercators Projection,” the photo is from his series “North/South” taken while on tour of Antarctica and Greenland. You can follow Burdeny’s most recent work on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 

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