interior design

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Animation Design

Satisfying Looped Animations Inspired by Interior Design Elements

October 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Motion graphics artist Andreas Wannerstedt designs short animated loops that present invented machines performing mesmerizing tasks. His videos are often inspired by real-world interior design, and incorporate elements such as rose gold, dark wood grains, and tropical Monstera leaves. The works are published under a series of iterations titled “Oddly Satisfying” which he posts to his Instagram and Vimeo accounts. You can see additional projects by the Swedish designer on his website. (via Vice)

 

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Design Food

A Cafe in Seoul Uses Clever Contour Lines to Appear Like a 2-Dimensional Cartoon

September 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photo by @bulaiern

Since 2017, a small cafe in South Korea has been transporting its visitors to a two-dimensional world. Cafe Yeonnam-dong 239-20 in Seoul features all-white walls, floors, furniture, and fixtures accented with black contour lines that give the space the flattened look of a cartoon drawing. Illustration-inspired elements include drawn cacti, a curious puppy, and blank picture frames. Some of the beverage containers even sport defining lines. You can take a peek inside the playful cafe on Instagram and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)

Photo by @benjamin_liang

Photo by @cg__shinwonho

Photo by @__elsalovetravel__

Photo by @tsaichialing_kelly

Photo by @mmarichell

Photo by d7my_uk_

Photo by @adayinthelalz

 

 



Art Design

Interior Bas-Relief Sculptures of Peacocks and Lush Florals by Goga Tandashvili

May 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Russian artist Goga Tandashvili carves large-scale bas-relief works in interior spaces, adding details such as florals, tropical leaves, and perched peacocks to otherwise flat surfaces. The three-dimensional murals project from the wall with a life-like accuracy, with each bloom and sprout of plumage having the same shape and size as the object it imitates. Tandashvili uses a combination of hand building and carving techniques to create the nature-based sculptures, which act as fluid extensions of the wall itself. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Design

Japanese-Designed Public Restrooms in the Shape of Fish, Crabs, Tree Stumps

February 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Flickr user and photographer Okinawa Soba (Rob) has been documenting the obscure designs of public restroom facilities on the Japanese island of Okinawa for the last six years. Rob has lived on the island, which is home to 1.3 million residents, for nearly 43 years, and has had the chance to explore some of the stranger bathrooms the prefecture has to offer. Included in this group is a koi-shaped bathroom which asks guests to enter through the mouth, a sliced orange, a stubby trunk with windows that have replaced its missing branches, and a robotic crab. You can see more of Rob’s unique Japanese finds (including these Okinawa manhole covers) on his photostream. (via Web Urbanist)

 

 



Design

Architect Ricardo Bofill’s Abandoned Cement Factory Residence and Studio

February 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

In 1973 Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill stumbled upon a cement factory in Catalonia, Spain, an enormous compound of silos and buildings that covered nearly two and a half miles of underground tunnels. Bofill decided to buy The World War I era structure and its grounds, making modifications to the original structure in order to create an all-inclusive live/work space that would unite the Surrealist, Abstract, and Brutalist elements found in its industrial form.

Original construction to transform the sprawling series of buildings took a little over a year and a half. After the dust cleared from the jack hammers and dynamite, Catalan craftsmen worked to add gardens and purpose back into the abandoned compound. Today the factory holds a cathedral, model workshop, archive rooms, residence, and studio, a workspace for Bofill’s firm spread over four floors in the factory’s silos and connected by a spiral staircase.

Despite over forty years in the making, the entire project is constantly evolving and is one that Bofill never sees as being fully completed. With continuous tweaks, Bofill has created a perfectly programmed existence, a ritualized lifestyle that goes against his previously nomadic early life.

“I have the impression of living in a precinct, in a closed universe which protects me from the outside and everyday life,” said Bofill on his website. “The Cement Factory is a place of work par excellence. Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure.”

You can see more images of the garden-covered structures on Bofill’s website, and see a short Nowness documentary on his studio and residence below. (via Designboom)

 

 



Design History

A Century-Old Buenos Aires Theater Converted Into a 21,000-Square-Foot Bookstore

July 18, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Built in Buenos Aires as a performing arts theater in 1919, El Ateneo Grand Splendid‘s content has undergone several revisions, with its current purpose being a 21,000 square foot bookstore. Despite the switching of functions, the architecture has remained true to the early 20th century vision of Peró and Torres Armengol, the building still boasting ornate frescoed ceilings and detailed trimmings that line the ceiling, handrails, and walls.

The stage and balcony seating is also intact, the spaces now used as reading areas where guests can peruse the store’s many books in front of thick velvet curtains. These attributes were almost destroyed in 2000 when the building was slated for demolition, however before the historic theater could be taken away it was leased to Grupo Ilhsa who built out the bookstore. Now over 1,000,000 people walk through Al Ateneo Grand Splendid’s doors annually keeping the tiered theater very much alive. If you liked this, also check out the Waanders in de Broeren bookstore built inside a cathedral. (via Twisted Sifter)

Image by longhorndave

Image by longhorndave

Image by Liam Quinn

Image by Liam Quinn

Image by Liam Quinn

Image by Liam Quinn

 

 



Art Design

Taxi Fabric Fills Plain Cab Interiors with Vibrant Original Artworks

February 1, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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‘A Century of Revolt’ Taxi Fabric interior designed by Kunel Guar.

When thinking of decor inside an American taxicab, your imagination is probably limited to an LED payment screen blaring annoying ads and maybe a pine tree air freshener dangling from a rearview mirror. In India, a new firm is thinking a bit more creatively by helping cab drivers completely transform the interior of their taxis with original art by local designers. Mumbai-based TaxiFabric creates cloth interiors printed with vibrant designs that cover nearly every inch of a vehicle’s interior from the ceiling to the door panels and even the seats themselves.

TaxiFabric is an interesting hybrid of interior design, advertising, and promotion of local culture, with a number of benefits both to the cab driver and the artists. Drivers report that after applying the designs to their vehicles, passengers often tip more and remain in the cabs longer. Artists in turn have their work seen by a large new audience and are easily identified by a prominent label on the back of every seat.

From the TaxiFabric website:

Taxis in India, particularly in Mumbai, are not only the most convenient form of transport but have also become an iconic piece of culture. Although much attention is given to each taxi by its driver – to make it stand out from his competitors – very little thought is given to the fabric used on the seats. The designs that cover the taxi seats are often functional and forgettable and with the outstanding design talent Mumbai has to offer, this shouldn’t be the case.

Design, as a job or even simply something studied at school, is unfortunately not widely recognised in India. Older generations don’t understand it- design to them, just performs a function. Many people don’t know that design can create a real impact. With so few spaces for young people to show off their skills, it’s hard to change that perception.

There are dozens of interior designs currently installed in taxis and rickshaws across Mumbai. You can explore more of them on their Tumblr. (via The Creator’s Project)

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