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Art Craft Design

Miniature Skulls Carved from Pearls Used to Create Anatomical Jewelry

August 25, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Producing work since 1974, Japanese artist and jeweler Shinji Nakaba infuses all matter of anatomical forms, skulls, and flowers into what he describes as “wearable sculptures.” The pieces come in all shapes and sizes, but his most prolific series involves human and animal skulls carved from oyster pearls and attached to rings, necklaces, and brooches. In addition to selling pieces through his online shop, Nakaba’s work has been shown at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Arts & Design in New York, as well as several galleries and museums around Japan. You can see more of his jewelry designs and pearl carvings on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Art

A Sailing Ship Dripping with Loot Explores the Perceived Status Symbol of Pearls

June 15, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Ann Carrington‘s piece “Galleons and Feathers” is inspired by Wing Wo Wave City, an industrial estate in Zhuijang Province, China which manufactures a massive amount of pearl adornment. The piece is formed in the shape of a 3-mast shop, floating over an opulent sea of brooches, earrings, necklaces and tiaras. The work both contains, and is inspired by, these glistening round objects, and Carrington explains on her website that they highlight “the discrepancy between their perceived status of being timeless status symbols of refined taste and wealth (with exotic overtones) and the often very unromantic reality.”

Carrington studied at Bournville College of Art, Birmingham and The Royal College of Art where she graduated in 1987. Carrington was invited by the United Nations in 2010 to produce artwork that raised awareness of current issues, her first work for them presented at the UN Human Trafficking conference in December 2010. She will have a solo show at The Royal College of Art in October 2016. (via Supersonic and Lustik)

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Craft Dance

Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

April 9, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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Craft Design

Custom Glass Planets Containing the Cremated Remains of Loved Ones

March 30, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Merry Coor produces ethereal designs from cremated remains within custom glass beads. Coor crafts each bead by hand, first melting glass into a round bead, then spiraling the design out of ashes on top, and finally sealing the design with an outer layer of clear glass. For each bead she not only requests a 1/2 teaspoon of ashes, but also a picture, letter, or story of the deceased so she can develop a personal connection while forming the piece of jewelry.

Coor has been making glass beads for about 15 years, but it wasn’t until last year that she began incorporating ashes into their designs. After this development Coor explained, “My bead making now gave me a new purpose, and a way to honor others, both living and passed.”

Custom beads can be requested by the California-based artist either through her company’s website, Ash Beads, or through her Etsy. (via Laughing Squid, Bored Panda)

 

 



Craft Design

Handmade Resin Bangles Embedded with Flowers and Bark

February 9, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Hand-made in Coos Bay, Oregon, these resin bangles are infused with plants, leaves, flowers, shells, and strips of bark. Much of what you see here is available through Faerie and dozens of additional pieces are available through Etsy. (via Crafty Allegieance)

 

 



Design

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio-Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood

August 19, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Product designer Marcel Dunger conceived of this fascinating and elegant way of creating small rings, pendants, and earrings by “repairing” broken pieces of maple wood with colored bio-resins. The resin is first poured onto a larger piece of broken wood and after the hardening process the piece is then machined into pieces of jewelry.

We’ve seen so many different projects using resin lately from sculptures of aquatic life to hair ornaments, but what’s probably more interesting, as pointed out by The Fox is Black’s Bobby Solomon, is the trend of visibly incorporating repairs into new or improved objects. We’ve seen it with Japanese Kintsugi pieces, furniture created by fusing tree trunks with cast aluminum, and even another wood/resin combo resulting in glowing kitchen shelves. As far as turning waste products into functional objects, or extending the life of something broken, it’s a visually striking idea that will hopefully be incorporated by more artists and designers. You can see more of Dunger’s work in his online portfolio. (via The Fox is Black, Behance)

Update: Jewelry designer Britta Boeckmann creates a similar form of jewelry and has quite a few pieces available in her shop.

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Art

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls

July 25, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) building case (studio view), 1980-2000. Material: Gold, pearls, turquoise. Length: 2.5 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

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Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away.

After first learning about caddisflies, self-taught (and self-professed amateur) artist Hubert Duprat had a thought. Had a caddisfly ever naturally encountered a fleck of gold in a river and used it to build a home? And then one step further: what if a caddisfly had only gold and other precious stones or jewels to work with?

Trichoptères, French for the scientific name of the caddisfly, is Duprat’s answer to that question. For years the artist has been collaborating with the tiny insects, providing them small aquariums of gold, turquoise and pearls that the the larvae readily use to construct their temporary homes. Regardless of how creepy crawly you might find the insects, it’s impossible to deny the strange beauty of the final product, tiny gold sculptures held together with silk. Encountering them void of any context, one would assume they were constructed by a jeweler.

Duprat currently has a solo exhibition at the Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania which runs through July 28th, and it should be noticed that is work with caddisflies is only one small aspect of his art practice.

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Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

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Trichoptera larva with case, 1980-2000. Material: gold and pearls. Dimension: 0.5 x 1.9 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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Trichoptera (caddis larva) case on pedestal. Photographer: Fabrice Gousset.

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A huge thank you to the Museum of Old and New Art and photographer Fabrice Gousset for providing the images for this post. If you liked this, don’t miss the work of (via ARTREBELS)

 

 

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