miniature

Posts tagged
with miniature



Art

Cleverly Carved Rocks Seem to Open and Flex in New Stone Sculptures by Hirotoshi Ito

May 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Unpolished rocks are sliced and diced in the clever sculptures of Hirotoshi Ito (previously). The Japanese artist carefully carves away sections of naturally-textured stone to create the illusion of motion or flexibility. Rocks appear to be sliced with table knives, hinged to act as velvet-lined coin purses, or unzipped to reveal mouths and miniature worlds. When Ito isn’t carving these lighthearted designs, he creates tombstones, monuments, and sculptures as the Ito Stone Shop. You can stay up to date with Ito’s art via Facebook.

 

 



Art

Imitation China Plates and Layered Cut Paper Animals Explore the Sculptural Potential of Paper in a New Exhibition at Paradigm Gallery

April 19, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Miniature paper work by Nayan and Vaishali, all images courtesy of Paradigm Gallery

Miniature paper work by Nayan and Vaishali, all images courtesy of Paradigm Gallery

Subtle manipulations, intricate cuts, and ornate collages are a few of the various ways contemporary artists are transforming paper today. These techniques and more are displayed in the upcoming exhibition pa•per, curated by Paradigm Gallery co-founder Jason Chen and featuring artists outside of the gallery’s roster. The list includes Nayan and Vaishali (previously), the India-based duo who spend 4-6 hours a day crafting precisely sliced and painted miniature animals. Kent-based artist Sally Hewitt creates the illusion of a body’s impression on cartridge paper by gently prodding the material with needles, bodkins, and embossing tools. Other included artists like Danielle Krysa and Lizzie Gill use collage, while Rosa Leff cuts traditional patterns and imagery found on fine china into cheap paper plates. The exhibition, hosted at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, opens on April 26 and runs through May 18, 2019.

Danielle Krysa

Danielle Krysa

Lizzy Gill

Lizzie Gill

Sally Hewitt

Sally Hewitt

Nayan and Vaishali

Nayan and Vaishali

Rosa Leff

Rosa Leff

Albert Chamillard

Lucha Rodríguez

Lucha Rodríguez

Daria Aksenova

Daria Aksenova

 

 



Art Documentary

Life in Miniature: Medical Devices and Pre-Packaged Foods Immortalized in Tiny Sculptures by Kath Holden and Margaret Shaw

April 2, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kath Holden constantly daydreams about the everyday objects she can transform into tiny sculptures. Even during doctor’s appointments, the U.K.-based miniaturist glances around the room to investigate which medical devices she can cull for inspiration. Holden runs Delph Minatures with her business partner and mother Margaret Shaw, a fellow miniature maker who specializes in food-related items such as pre-packaged steaks, baskets of fruit, and trays of brownies.

The pair was recently profiled in Life in Miniature, a short film by Ellen Evans which delves into the women’s studios and their opinions on the world of miniatures. Holden explains that she views other miniaturists as often being stuck in the past. She doesn’t understand the desire to recreate Georgian and Victorian houses, when you could produce objects for ordinary people, and produce objects relevant today. “I like to represent now,” she explains in the film. “The era I life in. If we don’t do miniatures of what we do now, how will it be represented in the future?”

The film premiered at the Sheffield DocFest in June 2018 and was in the official selection for Sundance Film Festival, SXSW, Hot Docs, Aspen ShortsFest, and several other festivals. You can view the short documentary in the video above, and learn more about the Holden and Shaw’s wide range of contemporary miniatures on their website.

 

 



Art

Miniature Figures Top Coin Purses, Makeup Compacts, and Teapots in Lush Narrative Scenes by Kendal Murray

March 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Family Style, Smile" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 10 cm

“Family Style, Smile” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 10 cm

Kendal Murray works in miniature, crafting assemblages that present familial scenes built into and on top of common items found in the home such as glass tea pots or coin purses. The objects are often covered in fake grass, and present wholesome scenarios—such as a family posing on their car in front of fall foliage, or a man taking a jog through a pasture (while being followed closely by a heard of fluffy sheep). The Sydney, Australia-based artist is currently lecturing in Design at the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University, and is represented by Arthouse Gallery in New South Wales, Australia. You can see more of her playful sculptures on her website.

"Bird’s Eye View, Blue Sky Debut" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 13 x 13 cm

“Bird’s Eye View, Blue Sky Debut” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 13 x 13 cm

"Promised Land, On Hand" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 10 x 8 x 10 cm

“Promised Land, On Hand” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 10 x 8 x 10 cm

"Breakfast Time, Just in Time" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 13 cm

“Breakfast Time, Just in Time” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 13 cm 

"Exceed Speed, Mislead, Concede" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 24 x 14 cm

“Exceed Speed, Mislead, Concede” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 24 x 14 cm

"Fun Run, Dry Run" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

“Fun Run, Dry Run” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

"Fun Run, Dry Run" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

“Fun Run, Dry Run” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

"Earthward, Skyward, Homeward" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 21 x 26 x 16 cm

“Earthward, Skyward, Homeward” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 21 x 26 x 16 cm

 

 



Craft Food

Miniature Embroideries by ipnot Transform Thread into Delicious Designs

January 9, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese embroidery artist ipnot (previously) continues to dazzle us with her creative miniatures formed from thread and embroidery hoops. The works often incorporate props, such as ketchup bottles or chopsticks, to add an interactive layer to the pieces. Textile noodles are staged in slurping position while a perfect pile of ketchup appears to have just been dolloped onto another one of her works. The artist’s realistic designs typically involve food, like her recent sushi stop-motion animation, or a hovering pizza slice that appears to be connected to an embroidery hoop with melted cheese. You can see more of the artist’s embroideries on Instagram.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Sushi Roll🍣 – #embroidery #stopmotion #ipnot#節分#恵方巻#刺繍

A post shared by ipnot (@ipnot) on

 

 



Art

Hundreds of Artists Scale Down Their Work for Giant Robot’s 14th Annual Post-It Show

December 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Image via Mark Todd

Image via Mark Todd

This December marked the 14th annual Post-It Show held by Los Angeles-based gallery Giant Robot. Each year the exhibition gathers thousands of scaled down artworks from emerging and established artists, and sells each one of the 3 x 3 inch pieces for $25. Over four hundred artists participated in this year’s exhibition, including works by Yoskay Yamamoto, James Jean, HuntzAnthony Zinonos, Hayley Powers Thornton-Kennedy, Simpsons creator Matt Groening, and many, many more. Although a majority of the included artists decided to simply paint or draw directly onto the miniature canvas, others like Sean Chao add their own spin, placing a miniature clay raccoon through a small hole in the orange paper as if the sculpture is bursting through.

Despite the creative takes on the exhibition’s premise, each artist starts with the same prompt and medium, and their work is sold for the same flat fee. “I think Post-its are great since they’re ubiquitous items that people doodle on and at the same time provides a great medium that confines but at the same time challenges,” Giant Robot owner Eric Nakamura told My Modern Met.

Post-It Show 14 ended earlier this month, but you can still browse works created for the exhibition on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

Work by Sean Chao, image via @giantrobot

Work by Sean Chao, image via @giantrobot

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post-it by Huntz

Post-it by Huntz

Image by @apbozalis

Image by @apbozalis

Image by Mark Toddy, post-its by Anthony Zinonos

Image by Mark Todd, post-its by Anthony Zinonos

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post-its by Yoskay Yamamoto

Post-its by Yoskay Yamamoto

 

 



Craft Design

Miniature Interior Decor Elements Crafted With Impeccable Detail by Kiyomi

December 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese miniaturist Kiyomi imitates antiques with a stunning attention to detail, creating worn and clouded glass jars, slightly tarnished silverware, and cases packed with dozens of drawers. The talented craftswoman produces pieces for dollhouses out of paper, wire, wood, and other materials that imitate their larger companions. To give her audience a sense of scale, the artist will present her small works alongside a scaleable object, either placing a miniature chair on the seat of a regularly proportioned seat or dwarfing a set of drawers by putting it on the step of a ladder. You can see more of her antique items and delicious-looking fake pastries on her Instagram and website.  (via My Modern Met)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Artist Cat Enamel Pins