mirrors

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Art Design

Swiveling Mirror Installation Skews Perspectives of Historic Venetian Architecture

March 27, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Arnaud Lapierre and Andrea Giadini

AZIMUT, an installation by French artist and designer Arnaud Lapierre, offers a prismatic look at some of Venice’s historic structures. Situated along the waterfront of Riva degli Schiavoni, 16 titled mirrors with battery-powered motors rest on the cobblestone walkway in front of the Palazzo Ducale, a gothic landmark that dates back to the 14th century and currently houses one of the Italian city’s museums. The reflective circles spin in tandem, offering a magnified view of the palace’s patterned stone and the intricate details on its facade.

When facing the water, the mirrors even pick up glimpses of the San Giorgio Maggiore, a Benedictine church that was completed in the 16th century. Featuring massive marble columns, the basicillica was designed by Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio.

Lapierre described the project as “a loss of balance, of recomposing landscape and a patchwork observation,” of the surrounding architecture and historic city. For more of his designs that question and alter perspectives, head to Instagram and Vimeo. (via designboom)

 

 



Art

Thousands of Miniature Mirrors Dazzle and Refract in Multi-Media Sculptures by Lee Bul

August 1, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Installation view, Lehmann Maupin, Chrystie Street, New York, May 2-June 21, 2014, all images via Lehmann Maupin

Korean artist Lee Bul examines shared human consciousness in a variety of forms, creating tentacled sculptures, futuristic chandeliers, and other large-scale forms that refract the audience through tiny mirrored tiles. The installations and sculptures are at once inspired by the past as they draw from societal folklore and shared histories, and the future, as they consider technological advancements.

“For Lee Bul, humankind’s fascination with technology ultimately refers to our preoccupations with the human body and our desire to transcend flesh in pursuit of immortality,” explains the artist’s biography. “This interest often materializes in her work in the form of a cyborg—a being that is both organic and machine—the closest thing to a human that truly achieves this ideal.”

Bul views the cyborg as a metaphor for our current attraction and repulsion to advanced technology, her works a dual representation of its attractive and monster-like qualities. This year Lee Bul received the Ho-Am Prize for The Arts, which is awarded to people of Korean heritage who have made significant accomplishments to science, engineering, medicine, community service, the arts, or other specialized fields. Bul’s solo exhibition of recent painting and sculpture titled City of the Sun closed at SCAD Museum of Art on July 28, 2019. You can see more of her sculptures and installations on her gallery Lehmann Maupin’s website.

Installation view of “From Me, Belongs to You Only,” Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, February 4-May 27, 2012

“Sternbau No. 32” (2011), Crystal, glass and acrylic beads on nickel-chrome wire, stainless steel and aluminum armature, 66.93 x 36.22 x 34.25 inches

“Untitled sculpture (M5)” (2014), Mirrored tiles, acrylic paint on polyurethane sheets, stainless steel armature, 62.2 x 110.24 x 15.75 inches

“Sternbau No. 4” (2007), Crystal, glass and acrylic beads on nickel-chrome wire, stainless steel and aluminum armature, 51.18 x 27.56 x 27.56 inches, Installation view, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, 2007, Photo: Patrick Gries

“Untitled” (2010), Polyurethane panels, mirrored tiles, acrylic paint, 86.61 x 24.8 x 23.62 inches

“Souterrain” (2012), Plywood on wooden frame, acrylic, mirror, alkyd paint, 107.87 x 141.73 x 188.98 inches

“Monster Black” (1998-2011), Fabric, cotton filling, stainless-steel frame, sequins, acrylic paint, dried flower, glass beads, aluminum, crystal, metal chain, 85.43 x 73.62 x 67.32 inches

 

 



Art

Dozens of Mirrored Prisms Respond to Movement with Dazzling LED Lights

April 2, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Alan Tansey

All images © Alan Tansey

Mirror Mirror, a recent commission by the Alexandria, Virginia’s Office of the Arts, is a reflective semi-circular structure which hides a prismatic array of mirrors at its center. The multi-colored panels are placed at sharp angles within the round sculpture, and refract dazzling, geometric patterns of light as the sun hits its interior. The work was produced by New York-based design studio SOFTlab, who was inspired by the lens used in the city’s historic 19th-century lighthouse. The Fresnel lens was an advanced technology at the time, and uses a series of prisms to create a bright and direct light source as a navigational aid.

In addition to reflecting Alexandria’s waterfront and the surrounding urban environment, the outdoor installation has LED fixtures that respond to visitors’ voices and bodies. Each vertical component of the structure is activated to produce light, allowing the work to be brilliantly illuminated, even after the sun sets. A demonstration of how the sculpture reacts to human movement can be seen in the video below. You can view more works by SOFTlab on their website and Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 



Design

Mirage: Doug Aitken’s Mirrored House Creates a Kaleidoscopic View of the Surrounding Swiss Mountains

February 10, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

For this year’s Elevation 1049, a series of site-specific installations dotting the mountain town of Gstaad, Switzerland, the chosen theme is “Frequencies.” In response, Los Angeles-based artist Doug Aitken (previously) installed a house-shaped structure made almost entirely of mirrored surfaces that reflect the mountains, skies, and trees. Aptly named Mirage Gstaad after the region and its optical effect, the ranch-style structure echoes the snow-covered landscape while also disappearing into the surrounding environment. The structure’s angled walls and ceiling easily bounce light, which creates a kaleidoscopic view of the area’s mountain peaks when seen from within.

The materials for the structure were sourced locally and transported by truck to the site back in November before the snow season began. Aitken and his team tell Colossal that the location and materials were chosen in collaboration with local authorities to “be conscious of environmental issues, such as the fritting (the aluminium stripes) that were added to the reflective surface for the safety of birds.”

Having launched alongside the program at the beginning of February 2019, Aitken’s structure will continue to reflect the changing landscape of Gstaad for the next two years. Admission to the mirage and other Elevation 1049 installations is free. For locations and directions head to the project website, and for more of Doug Aitken’s work, follow his studio on Instagram. (via designboom)

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Torvioll Jashari.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Torvioll Jashari.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Torvioll Jashari.

 

 



Art

Mirrored Figures Reflect the Natural Landscape and Cultural Heritage of Morecambe Bay

October 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Rob Mulholland (previously) was recently commissioned by the Morecambe Bay Partnership to create a site-specific installation that would connect with the history of the northwest England site. The British sculptor and environmental artist created a series of six mirrored figures and two dwellings that represent the communities that once settled on the land. Visitors to the public project can view themselves reflected in the shapes of the area’s past, while also getting a new perspective on the surrounding hills and glistening sea. The project is a part of the Headlands to Headspace initiative, which is working to protect Morecambe Bay’s natural habitats such as salt marshes, sand dunes, coastal limestone grasslands, and woodland. You can see more of Mulholland’s mirrored figures on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Photography

Abstracted Dual Landscapes Created Using Cleverly Placed Mirrors

August 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Sebastian Magnani carefully positions round mirrors in outdoor settings to capture two landscapes at once: the ground below and the sky above. In the ongoing series Reflections, some compositions reflect connected imagery, like blossom-covered grass and a flowering tree. Others juxtapose man-made surfaces like asphalt with organic branches. By removing the usual context of landscape images, Magnani allows the viewer to focus on the textural qualities of the environment, and some images even veer into illusions, as with the cloudy night sky that appears like a full moon.  You can see more from the Swiss photographer, including portraits, on Instagram and Facebook. Magnani has also recently started offering prints of the Reflections series on Society6. (via Bored Panda)