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Art

Dozens of Mirrored Prisms Respond to Movement with Dazzling LED Lights

April 2, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Alan Tansey

All images © Alan Tansey

Mirror Mirror, a recent commission by the Alexandria, Virginia’s Office of the Arts, is a reflective semi-circular structure which hides a prismatic array of mirrors at its center. The multi-colored panels are placed at sharp angles within the round sculpture, and refract dazzling, geometric patterns of light as the sun hits its interior. The work was produced by New York-based design studio SOFTlab, who was inspired by the lens used in the city’s historic 19th-century lighthouse. The Fresnel lens was an advanced technology at the time, and uses a series of prisms to create a bright and direct light source as a navigational aid.

In addition to reflecting Alexandria’s waterfront and the surrounding urban environment, the outdoor installation has LED fixtures that respond to visitors’ voices and bodies. Each vertical component of the structure is activated to produce light, allowing the work to be brilliantly illuminated, even after the sun sets. A demonstration of how the sculpture reacts to human movement can be seen in the video below. You can view more works by SOFTlab on their website and Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 



Design

Mirage: Doug Aitken’s Mirrored House Creates a Kaleidoscopic View of the Surrounding Swiss Mountains

February 10, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

For this year’s Elevation 1049, a series of site-specific installations dotting the mountain town of Gstaad, Switzerland, the chosen theme is “Frequencies.” In response, Los Angeles-based artist Doug Aitken (previously) installed a house-shaped structure made almost entirely of mirrored surfaces that reflect the mountains, skies, and trees. Aptly named Mirage Gstaad after the region and its optical effect, the ranch-style structure echoes the snow-covered landscape while also disappearing into the surrounding environment. The structure’s angled walls and ceiling easily bounce light, which creates a kaleidoscopic view of the area’s mountain peaks when seen from within.

The materials for the structure were sourced locally and transported by truck to the site back in November before the snow season began. Aitken and his team tell Colossal that the location and materials were chosen in collaboration with local authorities to “be conscious of environmental issues, such as the fritting (the aluminium stripes) that were added to the reflective surface for the safety of birds.”

Having launched alongside the program at the beginning of February 2019, Aitken’s structure will continue to reflect the changing landscape of Gstaad for the next two years. Admission to the mirage and other Elevation 1049 installations is free. For locations and directions head to the project website, and for more of Doug Aitken’s work, follow his studio on Instagram. (via designboom)

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Stefan Altenburger.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Torvioll Jashari.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Torvioll Jashari.

Doug Aitken, Mirage Gstaad, 2019,
 Part of Elevation 1049: Frequencies, Gstaad, Switzerland.
 Image courtesy of the Artist; Photo by Torvioll Jashari.

 

 



Art

Mirrored Figures Reflect the Natural Landscape and Cultural Heritage of Morecambe Bay

October 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Rob Mulholland (previously) was recently commissioned by the Morecambe Bay Partnership to create a site-specific installation that would connect with the history of the northwest England site. The British sculptor and environmental artist created a series of six mirrored figures and two dwellings that represent the communities that once settled on the land. Visitors to the public project can view themselves reflected in the shapes of the area’s past, while also getting a new perspective on the surrounding hills and glistening sea. The project is a part of the Headlands to Headspace initiative, which is working to protect Morecambe Bay’s natural habitats such as salt marshes, sand dunes, coastal limestone grasslands, and woodland. You can see more of Mulholland’s mirrored figures on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Photography

Abstracted Dual Landscapes Created Using Cleverly Placed Mirrors

August 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Sebastian Magnani carefully positions round mirrors in outdoor settings to capture two landscapes at once: the ground below and the sky above. In the ongoing series Reflections, some compositions reflect connected imagery, like blossom-covered grass and a flowering tree. Others juxtapose man-made surfaces like asphalt with organic branches. By removing the usual context of landscape images, Magnani allows the viewer to focus on the textural qualities of the environment, and some images even veer into illusions, as with the cloudy night sky that appears like a full moon.  You can see more from the Swiss photographer, including portraits, on Instagram and Facebook. Magnani has also recently started offering prints of the Reflections series on Society6. (via Bored Panda)

 

 

 



Art

Mirrored Installations by Sarah Meyohas Create Infinite Tunnels Strewn With Dangling Flowers

August 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In artist Sarah Meyohas‘s series Speculations, infinite tunnels are created with facing mirrors set against pastel backdrops. Smoke, flowers, and finger tips border the reflective surfaces, creating dream-like environments that pull the viewer deep into the image’s frame. Meyohas is interested in the creating a seductive quality in each of the photos. “Whether it’s the colors or the flowers drawing you in, I want viewers to feel like they’re being drawing into the void, like standing upon a precipice,” the New York City-based artist tells Sleek Magazine. You can see more of her mirrored works on Instagram. (via Contemporary Art Blog)

 

 



Art

Take a Walk Through Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Narcissus Garden’ Inside an Abandoned Factory in the Rockaways

July 20, 2018

Andrew LaSane

All images: Rockaway! 2018 featuring a site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama. Artwork ©YAYOI KUSAMA. Artwork courtesy Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore/Shanghai; Victoria Miro, London/Venice; and David Zwirner, New York. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo: Pablo Enriquez.

All images: Rockaway! 2018 featuring a site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama. Artwork ©YAYOI KUSAMA. Artwork courtesy Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore/Shanghai; Victoria Miro, London/Venice; and David Zwirner, New York. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo: Pablo Enriquez.

The Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, New York has a reputation for being a popular destination for those seeking respite from the oppressive heat and congestion of the city during the summer months. Those venturing out to parks and beaches between now and Labor Day (September 3) will have the opportunity to experience a site specific installation of Narcissus Garden by Yayoi Kusama (previously), presented by MoMA PS1 as a part of the Rockaway! 2018 free public art festival.

The installation is situated inside of an old train garage at Fort Tilden and is comprised of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres. The spheres reflect the graffiti-covered walls and rusted beams of the dilapidated building, so while the viewer is walking among the shiny garden, they are also seeing the destruction that Hurricane Sandy caused to the structure and to the region back in 2012. Rockaway! 2018 is the third iteration of a festival said to be a “celebration” of the recovery efforts that have taken place over the years, but the state of the building chosen for Kusama’s installation shows that things are still not back to normal after the devastating natural disaster.

Narcissus Garden was first presented in 1966 as a part of an unofficial performance at the 33rd Venice Biennial. The silver spheres were then made of plastic, and Kusama stood among her garden with a sign that read “Your Narcissism for Sale.” “What was most important about Narcissus Garden at Venice was my action of selling the mirror balls on the site, as if I were selling hot dogs or ice cream cones,” Kusama once said in an interview. The spheres were sold for $2 each.

The current installation is not for sale, but it is free and open to the public Friday through Sunday and on Labor Day from noon to 6pm. (via Hyperallergic)

 

 



Art

Step Inside a Swirling Mirror Room of Interactive Ocean Vortices by teamLab

December 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For their latest dizzying interactive installation, Japanese collective teamLab (previously) brought the ocean indoors, creating a projected environment that reacts to the movements of visitors, all encased within the infinite space of a mirror room. Titled “Moving Creates Vortices and Vortices Create Movement” the work is inspired in part by the life cycle of the ocean, particularly the movement of plankton as represented by the reactive particle effects that spin like whirlpools as you pass through the exhibition space. The speed and direction of people’s movements are all factored into the projections and in the absence of motion the room gradually reverts to darkness.

The Vortices installation just opened at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia where it will remain on view through April 15, 2018. You can learn more on teamLab’s website. (via Designboom)

All images © teamLab.

 

 

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