multiples

Posts tagged
with multiples



Art

New Textural Sculptures Made With Swirls of Seashells by Rowan Mersh

February 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Pithváva Praegressus II 2017, H30 X W19 XD17cm, Dentalium Shells

Rowan Mersh (previously) creates textural artworks that toe the line between two and three dimensions, using carefully placed swirls of seashells. Each artwork is made up one only one kind of shell, which the artist uses in multiples as he explores the physical qualities and hidden beauties of the material. Mersh explains his process to Colossal:

On beginning a new project I first make a small sample to understand how best to work with the material, using elements of my chosen material such as size, shape and colour of the material to inform surface pattern. This gives me a guide as to how scale and shape the resulting project. My aim with every project is to expose the true and often hidden beauty of the material I am working with and I feel this is only possible by listening to the material from day one.

The seashells are sourced from sustainable shell farmers and harvesters around the world, and Mersh creates his sculptural pieces in London, where he lives and works. Mersh is represented by Gallery FUMI and currently has new work in the gallery’s winter group show, up until February 24th.

Asabikeshiinh IV, 2017, Sliced Turritella Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh IV (detail), 2017, Sliced Turritella Shells, Fluorocarbon

Pithváva Praegressus I, 2017, H40 x W21 x D27.5cm, Dentalium Shells

Pithváva Praegressus I (detail), 2017, H40 x W21 x D27.5cm, Dentalium Shells

Asabikeshiinh V, 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh V (detail) 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh V, 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Echinothrix Imaginem Sui, 2017. H125 x W80 x D27cm, Tiger Sea Urchin Spines 

Echinothrix Imaginem Sui (detail), 2017. H125 x W80 x D27cm, Tiger Sea Urchin Spines

 

 



Art

James Brunt Organizes Leaves and Rocks Into Elaborate Cairns and Mandalas

February 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

James Brunt creates elaborate ephemeral artworks using the natural materials he finds in forests, parks, and beaches near his home in Yorkshire, England. This form of land art, popularized and often associated with fellow Brit Andy Goldsworthy, involves detailed patterns, textures, and shapes formed using multiples of one kind of material. Brunt collects twigs, rocks, and leaves and arranges them in mandala-like spirals and concentric circles. He photographs his finished work to document it before nature once again takes hold of his materials. The artist frequently shares updates via Twitter and Facebook where he sometimes invites the public to join him as he works. Brunt also offers prints of his photographed artworks on his website.

  

 

 



Art

Nora Fok’s Ethereal Hand-Knit Jewelry is Inspired by Nature and Science

February 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Nora Fok combines jewelry design with textile art in her science- and math-inspired wearable artworks. Fok, who is based in southeast England, works in her home studio creating all of her pieces manually, using hand tools, fine nylon microfilament and basic processes like weaving, knitting, braiding, and knotting. The work above is comprised of 3,500 knit spheres, and finished pieces can take weeks to produce. The artist describes her inspiration on her website:

She is intrigued by the world around her; she also asks questions and tries to find answers to them. She is fascinated by different aspects of nature, structure, systems and order, and the mysteries and magic which she sets out to capture in her work.

Fok has artwork that is currently being shown in the Jewelry of Ideas exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City, which is up through May 2018, and she shares exhibition dates and a small archive of jewelry on her website. If you like Nora’s work, also check out Mariko Kusumoto.

 

 



Art

Geronimo Fills Lincoln Center with a Massive Balloon Installation for the New York City Ballet

February 2, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Jihan Zencirli is not your average balloon artist. Based in Los Angeles and working under the moniker Geronimo, Zencirli builds sprawling conglomerations of perfectly spherical balloons in carefully selected color palettes. With vibrant colors and organically-inspired shapes, the balloons draw a contrast to the geometric and neutral toned buildings they are affixed to. The artist frequently installs her work outside, to emphasize its ephemeral nature and to allow as many people to encounter the work as possible.

Zencirli’s latest creation has been produced in collaboration with the New York City Ballet, as part of their Art Series. The annual series invites a contemporary artist to install a site-specific artwork in the heart of Manhattan at Lincoln Center, where the ballet has been based since 1964. This is the series’ sixth year and Zencirli is the first female artist to be selected. In anticipation of the event, an appropriately-over-the-top video introduces audiences to Geronimo, directed by Andy Bruntel.

The artwork was unveiled on January 26, and remains up until February 24th, during which time the Ballet has two special performances. There are also public viewing hours every day of the week from February 17 – 25. More information about performance times and viewing hours are available on NYCB’s website. Zencirli shares updates of her work on Instagram, and you can also find examples of some previous installations below.

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Timothy Simons of Echo Market, Los Angeles

Squarespace Headquarters for Pride Parade, NYC

Noisebridge Hackerspace, San Francisco

 

 



Art

Serpentine Coiled Sculptures of Found British Bird Feathers by Kate MccGwire

January 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Turmoil, 2016. Mixed media with pheasant feathers in antique dome. 58 x 43 x 60 cm. All photos by JP Bland

Kate MccGwire‘s roiling feather sculptures juxtapose the beautiful, delicate material with discomfiting shapes. Whereas her earlier work tended toward sprawling installations that oozed and slid toward the viewer, MccGwire’s more recent pieces are tightly wound and displayed within the confines of frames, cabinets, and bell jars.

Although at first glance the feathers’ incredible colors and patterns seem exotic, the British MccGwire sources all of her materials from dropped feathers provided by farmers, gamekeepers, and pigeon racers. She was originally inspired to begin working with feathers after discovering a local pigeon colony that dropped feathers near her rural art studio. Magpie and mallard feathers gleam an iridescent inky blue, and pheasant feathers sport detailed patterns.

In an interview with Artnews, MccGwire describes her work: “I’m thinking of it as being like an umbilical cord. I want to seduce by what I do—but revolt in equal measure. It’s really important to me that you’ve got that rejection of things you think you know for sure.”

MccGwire is represented by La Galerie Particuliere and Mark Sanders Art Consultancy and exhibits widely; she currently has works in three shows. The artist also shares updates on Facebook and Instagram.

Spill, 2016. Mixed media with magpie feathers. 53 x 93 x 9.5 cm

Spill (detail), 2016. Mixed media with magpie feathers. 53 x 93 x 9.5 cm

Sentient, 2016. Mixed media with goose feathers in bespoke cabinet. 56.5 x 40 x 40 cm

Spate, 2015. Mixed media with pheasant feathers. 127 x 155 x 10 cm

Conundrum, 2017. Mixed media with rooster feathers in bespoke brass vitrine. 100 x 60 x 30 cm

Swathe, 2014. Pigeon tail feathers on archival board. 69 x 69 x 17 cm

Swathe (detail), 2014. Pigeon tail feathers on archival board. 69 x 69 x 17 cm

Sissure: Breach, 2016. Mixed media with goose down and pigeon quills. 55 x 29 x 6 cm

 

 



Art

Writhing Organic Sculptures Formed from Nails by John Bisbee

January 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Viper, Welded Spikes, “Out of the Garden.” Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA, Dimensions Variable, 2016. Photo: Nick Benfey.

Over the past three decades, artist John Bisbee (previously) has dedicated his creative work to the medium of nails. Recent artwork includes several large installations that transform the stiff, architectural material into writhing organic shapes. “Out of the Garden” seems to reference the Biblical tale, with an enormous snake piercing the Fuller Craft Museum‘s wall with its fangs and a fruit-laden tree nearby. “Infinity Pool,” a circular wall installation, features larger spikes at the outer circumference that shrink to smaller nails toward the center, lending a dramatic sense of depth to the two dimensional work. Bisbee, who is based in Maine, has displayed his work across the northeastern US, and his upcoming 2018 show will be at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland, Maine.

Viper, detail.

Viper, detail.

Infinity Pool, Forged, Welded, 8, 6, 4, 2 and 1-inch Spikes, “The Needle and The Milkmaid”, SAPAR Contemporary, New York, New York, 58” x 58” x 3”, 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

Infinity Pool, detail.

Infinity Pool, detail.

Infinity Pool, detail.

Pods, Welded Spikes and Weld, “The Needle and The Milkmaid”, SAPAR Contemporary, New York, New York, Dimensions Variable, 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

Murmur, Welded, Hammered, 8, 6, 4, and 2-inch Spikes, “The Needle and The Milkmaid”, SAPAR Contemporary, New York, New York, Dimensions Variable, 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

Murmur, detail.

Murmur, detail.

Brittlestars, Forged, Welded, 12­inch Bright Common Spikes, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, 113”x 241”x 1”. 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

 

 



Art Illustration

Paul Saari’s Mysterious Dreamworlds Set in Melancholy Landscapes

January 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Canadian oil painter Paul Saari imagines mesmerizing worlds, which he renders in pastel tones. In some works, the softness of his painting style and the candy-like colors add to the mystical, dreamlike quality of the feathery forests and twinkling skies. In others, the soft colors and brushstrokes are jarred by ominous swirling weather patterns and dark, melancholy shadows. Saari shares his work on Instagram. If you like Saari’s work, also check out Julie Heffernan. (via CrossConnect Magazine)