murals

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Art

JR, Faith XLVII, and Two Dozen More Mural Artists Convene to Celebrate the Legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou

July 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Rabi of Cyrcle & JR’s Insideout Project, Los Angeles (2019). Photo: WISEKNAVE Fine Art Documentation

Muralists from around the world including JR, Faith XLVII, Axel Void, and Daniel Arsham came together for a weeklong Maya Angelou Mural Festival in Los Angeles celebrating the legendary poet. The artists, numbering more than two dozen, decorated the Dr. Maya Angelou Community High School with wall-scaling paintings that depicted or celebrated the visage and message of Dr. Angelou. Rabi and JR (previously) used Angelou’s “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings” in their design; Faith XLVII (previously) drew inspiration from the phoenix, a frequent motif in Angelou’s poetry. The mural festival was organized by Branded Arts. (via artnet)

Shawn Michael Warren’s mural (2019). Photo: staticmedium

HUGE’s mural. Photo: wiseknave (2019)

L: Daniel Arsham, Maya Angelou High School (2019). Photo: staticmedium / R: Victoria Cassinova’s mural (2019). Photo: staticmedium

Tochlita (2019). Photo: staticmedium

Axel void’s mural, (2019). Photo: Impermanent Art

Faith XLVII (2019). Photo: staticmedium

Perez Bros’ mural (2019). Photo: staticmedium

 

 



Art

Italian Artist Peeta Blends Graffiti and Abstract Forms Into Optical Illusion Murals

July 6, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Italian artist Peeta (previously) combines elements of graffiti and abstract art to paint murals that appear to morph and dissolve architectural structures. Abstract shapes swirl around and cut into walls to form M.C. Escher-like scenes that play tricks on the eyes and change depending on the viewing angle.

For the 2019 Stadt.Wand.Kunst mural project, Peeta painted a geometrical design onto a building on a street corner in Mannheim, Germany. Using sharp lines, curved forms, and different shades of blue, white, and grey, Peeta visually altered the structure’s edge and created a new impossible facade. “I loved this building since the beginning and I tried my best to combine multidisciplinary skills to transform it while keeping its original taste,” the artist wrote on Instagram. As with much of his other work, the limited color palette of the mural helps to sell the illusion and contrast the piece against the surrounding architecture.

Check out a few more of Peeta’s recent 3D murals below and follow his worldly travels on Instagram. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Art

A Collaboratively Painted ‘Mural of Brotherhood’ Stretches for Over a Mile on Mexico’s Border

June 26, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs courtesy of Enrique Chiu

Over the past two and a half years, nearly 4,000 volunteers have converged on the US/Mexico border to assist artist Enrique Chiu with painting a mural. Chiu began the project on Election Day in 2016, and once his collaborative project is complete, the “Mural of Brotherhood” will span a mile of Mexico’s border frontage in Tijuana. Shorter segments will also be created in other regions to connect the project to the southern edge of the border. The wide range of styles, including written phrases and more illustrative narratives reflects the diversity of those who have worked alonside Chiu to complete the expansive mural.

Chiu was born in Mexico and has spent 14 years living in the U.S., both as a child and as an adult. However, he re-rooted himself in Tijuana’s vibrant arts scene ten years ago. In an interview with Hyperallergic Chiu explained, “the murals spread messages of peace to people crossing the border by car or on foot,” and are “intended to be a final glimpse of hope for migrants risking danger as they cross northward.”

A recently released documentary by Alejandro Arguelles Benitez follows the project. You can watch the trailer below, and track the progress of the mural on Instagram. (via Hyperallergic)

 

 



Art

Textiles and Board Games Inspire Large-Scale Murals that Span Sidewalks, Streets, and Staircases

June 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Baltimore-based artists Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn, known as Jessie and Katey, started creating murals because of the sheer accessibility of public art. The pair have always created work with a big visual impact, but as their designs grew they began to consider the possibility of working on the ground in addition to large-scale walls. Their site-specific floor works combine inspirations from both textiles and board games to create interactive walkways that encourage play and exploration. Jessie and Katey explain to Colossal that “the compositions are inspired by the viewer and how they might travel through the work. It’s really fun watching little kids interact with the floor murals—they always know what to do.”

The math behind both textile design and quilting is an aspect that the pair must consider when painting their large-scale works, and have started to inform how the pair begins each piece’s early designs. “We approach our large-scale work a bit like screen printers, even though we don’t screen print,” the pair explains. “Our process of execution is very methodical and we tend to think in planes or layers. This is probably a result of having to develop concepts and adapt them to larger spaces in a short amount of time. It’s interesting that painting murals has informed how we paint murals.”

This summer Jessie and Katey are working with the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore to create a site-specific mural for the Foundation’s new community space. The artists will also be painting a piece in Sacramento in collaboration with Wide Open Walls and later this fall will be working on an immersive installation incorporating recycled materials at Baltimore’s Goucher College, a rare opportunity for the pair to work in three dimensions. You can view more of Jessie and Katey’s work on their website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Interlocking Pools of Color Swirl Across Building Facades in Bright Murals by Oli-B

June 3, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Brussels-based artist Oli-B uses carefully juxtaposed chromatic shapes to form abstract murals. A variety of organic forms with defined borders fit together: stripes and waves cut through scallop-edged blobs and perfect circles. The artist occasionally uses ombre and negative spaces to add depth and movement, but primarily works with continuous flat fields of color. Oli-B has been painting since his teen years, when he primarily worked with spray paint. In addition to his large-scale commissioned murals, Oli-B also creates screen prints, sculptures, and paintings on canvas. You can watch Oli-B in action here and see more of his vibrant artworks on Instagram. (via Street Art News)

 

 



Art

PangeaSeed’s Sea Walls Program Works to Save Earth’s Oceans One Mural at a Time

June 2, 2019

Andrew LaSane

NYCHOS

Combining art and activism, the PangeaSeed Foundation is a Hawaii-based nonprofit organization that is doing its part to help save Earth’s waters with its “Sea Walls: Artists For Oceans” international mural program. Since its inception in 2014, over 350 ocean-themed murals have been painted in 15 countries by the organization’s network of over 300 artists. With activations in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Mexico, and several other locations around the globe, the initiative engages the public and educates the world about critical environmental issues threatening our most precious resources through art, film screenings, and discussions.

PangeaSeed founder and executive director Tré Packard tells Colossal that when it comes to choosing which artists to work with and what they should paint, balance and community are key. “We always aim to create a balance between international, national and local artists,” he said. “Over the years, with the Sea Walls: Artists for Oceans program being nomadic, we’ve learned the importance of community ownership of the murals once we’ve packed up and left town. There tends to be so many incredible local creatives in the areas we host projects, so we work hand in hand with the local project director to help identify local artists who we invite to participate in the project.” Artists are given a list of topics to choose from and together with the team narrow it down to one. The murals are site-specific in that they address issues relevant to the places where they are painted. Some artists have even connected with local scientists and activists during the planning stage to better inform their designs.

Aaron Glasson and Jason Botkin

“The beauty of public art lies in the fact that it is a public good where even ‘non-artsy’ folks can be touched and empowered by experiencing the process or the finished product,” Packard said about the mural  program. “In addition to encouraging other artists to create for a purpose, our chief goal is to effect positive behavioral change at the individual and community level, so we’re thrilled when fans who aren’t artistically inclined are moved.” As for ways that people can get involved and help, he suggests finding ways to use less plastic, eating sustainable seafood, and voting for politicians with ocean-minded ideas.

Packard says that there are some dream projects on the horizon for Sea Walls, but those details are still under wraps for now. To learn more about the foundation and its upcoming activations, follow @pangeaseed and @Seawalls_ on social media.

Aaron Glasson and Jason Botkin (detail)

Seth Globepainter

Curiot

James Bullough and Li Hill

Onur

Phlegm

Sepe

Spok

Vans the Omega

 

 



Art Design

A Mural of Swirling Cursors, Dancing Skeletons, and Rainbow Hearts is Set in Motion When Viewed Through a “GIF-iti” App

May 29, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

For the D&AD (Design and Art Direction) festival, recently held in London, Shutterstock commissioned muralist and pattern designer INSA (previously) to create an interactive artwork. When viewed through the graffiti artist’s “GIF-iti” app, the multi-part mural, titled “File Under:Unresolved” springs to life in a looping animation. Multiple working image windows are filled with visual content from Shutterstock’s media library, ranging from cheerful Lisa Frank-esque rainbow hearts to a stock gif of a businessman smashing his laptop. Nestled among the working image windows are three file folders, constantly hovered over by an arrow cursor.

In a statement INSA wrote, “I hope that the work might make creatives consider how they feel about themselves, their work, the endless deadlines and their use of time in life.” This augmented mural is far from INSA’s first: the U.K.-based artist shares his animated artwork on Instagram and Tumblr. (via Fast Company)

 

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