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Art

Uncanny Trompe L’oeil Replicas of Classic Masterpieces Painted in Humble Outdoor Locations

November 6, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Malaga-based artist Julio Anaya Cabanding paints well-known masterpieces in unsuspecting public places to create captivating trompe l’oeil interventions. The classic scenes and their ornate frames are hand-painted on unlikely backdrops such as graffiti-filled walls, crumbling buildings, and slabs of stones by the sea. These decrepit locations are chosen on purpose, as Anaya Cabanding seeks a distinct contrast to the pristine halls of traditional art museums. “These places are inhospitable, decadent, and inappropriate to receive such a valuable object,” he explains to Colossal. “Opposite of what a museum is.”

Anaya Cabanding symbolically “steals” the works of art, presenting them in locations that are abandoned, peripheral, or difficult to access. To create each work he first outlines his replica in spray paint, and then meticulously fills in the details in acrylic paint. The practice evolved from his art education at the University of Fine Arts in Malaga where he developed an interest in site-specific works and traditional trompe l’oeil. It was at the encouragement of his graffiti-writing friend Imon Boy that he first moved his work from the studio to the street. “I really liked the result and the relationship between the trompe l’oeil painting and the environment, so I decided to continue doing that,” he recounts of his initial experience.

His interventions are so meticulously rendered that people often think they are Photoshopped, or mistake them for the original paintings. “A year ago I painted two paintings by Lucian Freud… in an exhibition with colleagues from the university,” he says. “When talking to one of their mothers one week later, a colleague realized she still thought she had seen two real paintings.” Recently Anaya Cabanding participated in the Jornadas Z de Montalbán contemporary art project organized by Rafael Jiménez and Demetrio Salces, in Córdoba, Spain. You can follow the Spanish artist’s uncanny interventions on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Moonlit Owls, Tigers, and Dragons Set Against Ethereal Backgrounds in Paintings by Takashi Kanazawa

November 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese artist Takashi Kanazawa paints animals such as tigers, owls, cranes, and dragons set against minimal backdrops which are lit by large waning moons. The scenes are painted on washi paper, a Japanese material produced by hand with local fiber, and are a twist on traditional Japanese painting, or Nihonga. The term was established near the turn of the 19th-century when Western oil painting became popularized in Japan, and refers to the traditional painting materials, techniques, and subjects rooted deeply in Japan’s art history.

Kanazawa’s work was recently included in the group exhibition NIHONGA: Contemporary Art of JapanSEIZAN Gallery‘s inaugural show in their New York City location. The exhibition brought together seven painters who reinterpret traditional Japanese art techniques through a contemporary lens. You can see more of Kanazawa’s painting on SEIZAN Gallery’s website.

 

 



Art

Larger-Than-Life Animals Terrorize Suburban Towns in Paintings by John Brosio

November 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"State of the Union 2" (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

“State of the Union 2” (2014), Oil on canvas, 40.25 x 68 inches

The paintings of John Brosio feel incredibly cinematic, as if each is a still from a contemporary horror film paused at a striking moment of tension. Brosio paints enlarged birds, crabs, and Big Gulp containers poised against the American suburban sprawl. The animals and objects hover over fast food chains and car repair shops, looking as if they might strike what lies below at any moment, or simply continue their crusade in an alternate direction. A humor creeps into the paintings when we remember the actual issues our contemporary society and climate face—if presented with the option would we rather choose invasion by iguana?

“The success of a painting in the end has so little to do with subject matter but compels us rather with how well it codifies the way in which things relate to one another in this universe,” he explains in his bio. “I think of painting as the pursuit of realizing some degree of surrender to these sensibilities through an orchestration of select relationships.”

His works have been considered “anxious realism” and seem to point to an particularly poignant American unease. You can see more of Brosio’s tension-filled and dangerous landscapes on his website and Instagram. (via Faithwaites)

"Quixote 2000" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

“Quixote 2000” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 39 inches

"Edge of Town 16" (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

“Edge of Town 16” (2018), Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

"Edge of Town 13" (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

“Edge of Town 13” (2015), Oil on canvas, 39 x 62 inches

"Progress" (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

“Progress” (2015), Oil on canvas, 36 x 36 inches

"State of the Union" (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

“State of the Union” (2011), Oil on canvas, 41 x 66 inches

"Whole Foods" (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

“Whole Foods” (2011), Oil on canvas, 24 x 46 inches

"Bar" (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

“Bar” (2018), Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches

 

 



Art Craft Design History

Art Historical Masterworks Come Alive at Annual Halloween Parade in Kawasaki, Japan

October 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Recently in Kawasaki, Japan, a sextet of famous paintings marched their way through the city’s annual Halloween parade— Picasso’s “The Weeping Woman,” Vincent van Gogh’s self portrait, Johannes Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa,” Edvard Munch’s “The Scream,” and of course Beast Jesus, the art world’s favorite botched masterpiece. Costume wearers presented themselves as the subjects of the famous paintings from the waist up, with fishnet stockings and heels from the waist down. The group won this year’s Pumpkin Award, taking home the grand prize and 500,000 yen, or around $4,400. You can see other prize winners of this year’s Kawasaki Halloween parade on their website, and view the paintings in action in a video by @_ellie_ below. (via Hyperallergic)

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @eurotwoner

Image via @eurotwoner

 

 



Art

Thick Strokes of Paint Create Featureless Portraits in Abstracted Paintings by Joseph Lee

October 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Los Angeles-based artist and actor Joseph Lee paints thickly layered portraits that mask the details and expressions of his subjects’ faces. His abstracted profiles sometimes reveal a subtle hint of an eye, nose, or ear between multi-colored brushstrokes, and are set against matte backgrounds to make each painting pop. Although the facial expressions are often hidden, the self-taught artist intends to bring emotions to each face through the turn of the head or the line of a jaw. You can see more of his impasto portraits on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Animals and Statues Serve as the Protagonists of Startlingly Realistic Post-Apocalyptic Paintings by Josh Keyes

October 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

Portland-based artist Josh Keyes (previously) paints hyperrealistic depictions of what he perceives the world might look like after the fall of humans. Animals such as sharks, tigers, and bulls remain as the final witnesses to the aftermath of human destruction—observing blazing fires, investigating displaced commercial objects, and swimming amongst melted ice caps. Monuments and statues also remain in this post-apocalyptic world, like in the artist’s recent painting Siren, which observes a graffiti-covered angel with a horn being splashed with the ocean’s high tide. Keyes’s solo exhibition Tempest opens on October 13, 2018 and runs through November 3, 2018 at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles. You can see more of his paintings on his Instagram and website. (via Supersonic Art)

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 24"

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 24″

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

“The Meadow” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Ascent” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

 

 



Art History

A Neoclassical Girl Towers Over Memphis in a Seven-Story Wheatpaste by Julien de Casabianca

October 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Julien de Casabianca (previously) is known for wheatpasting subjects from famous paintings onto public infrastructure as part of his ongoing Outings Project. Last month the French artist was invited to present a monumental installation at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee alongside an exhibition and workshop. De Casabianca’s seven-story mural features a melancholic girl pulled from William-Adolphe Bouguereau’s 1886 neoclassical painting “Au pied de la falaise,” which is included in the museum’s collection.

Like his previous interventions, de Casabianca wanted to give the subject a new home, while also liberating her from the structure of the painting’s frame. In her new position she gazes out over the city, surveying the landscape from the building’s fire escape. The work is part of Brooks Outside, a recent curatorial program that presents outdoor installations around the institution’s grounds and city. You can see de Casabianca’s new work at 62 E.H. Crump Blvd through November 2018 as weather permits, and follow his travels on Instagram. (via Brooklyn Street Art)