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Art

Detailed Portraits of Animals Combine Intricate Layers and Decorative Flourishes

January 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest series by Manila-based paper artist Patrick Cabral (previously) features three white animals detailed with elements of black and gold. A pink nose serves as a stylistic outlier for a  whiskered tiger, while the long and narrow trunk of Cabral’s elephant is completed with a dazzling linear adornment in gold. The animal’s design is similar to a previous elephant iteration Cabral created out of paper in 2017. However, the newer piece’s radial patterns on its forehead and symmetrical ears provide a distinct contrast in composition. To support their more permanent display, the artist used MDF to form each intricate layer.

These works, in addition to a quetzal with wide-spread wings, were commissioned by Starbucks for a new Reserve location in Manilla, Philippines. You can learn more about how these sculptures came to fruition on Instagram.

     

 

 



Art Craft

Carefully Molded Paper is Shaped into Personality-Filled Animal Portraits by Tiffany Miller Russell

January 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Colorado-based wildlife artist and natural history illustrator Tiffany Miller Russell uses carefully molded paper to express the unique characteristics of her animal subjects. To start the sculptural works, the artist first creates an original drawing. She then she cuts and forms found specialty papers by hand to build a three-dimensional collage atop the underlying illustration. “I delight in the unique and unusual,” she shares with Colossal, “and my goal when creating is to communicate with my viewer that excitement. I hope to pass along a little bit of wonder for the world around us.”

In addition to creating paper sculptures for the past fifteen years, the artist has also volunteered in a zoology prep lab and paleontology lab to further her knowledge and personal passion for evolutionary history. Miller Russell explains, “I’ve always felt a connection to animals. They have personalities and go about the world in their own ways that matter to them. Humans can anthropomorphize them, and cultures can bound them up in symbols and mythology, but that makes little difference to these creatures which have been going about their business and doing their own thing for millennia.”

The video below offers a time-lapse view of Miller Russell’s hands-on process. The artist tells Colossal that some of her larger tableaux can take up to 300 hours to complete. You can discover more of her three-dimensional animal portraits on her website and Facebook, as well as Etsy, where the artist offers originals and prints for sale.

 

 



Craft

Kirie Octopus Cut From a Single Piece of Paper by Masayo Fukuda

December 28, 2018

Johnny Waldman

Kirie (切り絵, literally ‘cut picture’) is the Japanese art of paper-cutting. Variations of kirie can be found in cultures around the world but the Japanese version is said to be derived from religious ceremonies and can be traced back to around the AD 700s. In its most conventional form, negative space is cut from a single sheet of white paper and then contrasted against a black background to reveal a rendering. Veteran kirie artist Masayo Fukuda (previously) has been practicing the art form for 25 years and recently revealed what she says is her greatest masterpiece of 2018.

Although the intricate piece looks like several layers overlapped, Fukuda stayed true to the conventional form, using only a single sheet of paper to render her detailed depiction of an octopus. The level of detail at times even looks like a fine ballpoint pen drawing. But a closer look confirms indeed that each and every detail is carefully made from cut-out negative space in the white paper.

If you’re interested in Fukuda’s work, she’ll be showcasing her kirie in a joint exhibition planned for next year. She’ll be showing her work along with fellow kirie artist Jun at Miraie Gallery in Osaka from April 24 – April 30, 2019. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Elaborately Collaged Newspapers by Myriam Dion Transform Current Events into New Visual Narratives

December 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In the patient hands of Myriam Dion (previously), daily newspapers become timeless works of art. The artist reads each newspaper she transforms from cover to cover before envisioning an entirely new visual identity for the inexpensive yet information-dense material. Using a combination of collage, X-ACTO knife cutting, gilding, and painting, Dion forms intricate patterns, often adorning and emphasizing a single image across the broadsheet.

“By crafting thoughtful mosaics out of the world events, I question our appetite for sound-bite news and sensational art, showing the quiet power of a patient hand and an inquisitive eye,” she explains in an interview with Huffington Post. “I am creating a new newspaper that can be interpreted, that encourages people to think more deeply about the news that we consume too easily.”

In addition to working with current events, Dion also engages vintage printed materials, like a 1953 issue of The Gazette that lauds a young Queen Elizabeth, and fact sheets from mid-century beauty pageant contestants. The artist is based in Montreal, Quebec, where she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Quebec. Dion is represented by Division Gallery, and her work will be part of the group exhibition “Pushing Paper” at Museum London in London, Ontario from January 26 to May 12, 2019. You can see more of her work on her website.

 

 



Craft Design

Cut Paper Illustrations Create Shadow and Depth in Imaginative Environments by John Ed De Vera

December 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Multidisciplinary designer John Ed De Vera builds cut paper illustrations that jump off the page, inviting his audience into the minds of deep sea divers, astronauts, and long distance runners. To more deeply immerse viewers in these imagined worlds, he creates depth and shadow by layering cut pieces of paper. The Philippines-based designer first traces each element out on bond paper. These shapes and designs and then transferred to thick paper that is cut and stacked into colorful arrangements. You can find more of his sculptural illustrations, on Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Art

Hundreds of Artists Scale Down Their Work for Giant Robot’s 14th Annual Post-It Show

December 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Image via Mark Todd

Image via Mark Todd

This December marked the 14th annual Post-It Show held by Los Angeles-based gallery Giant Robot. Each year the exhibition gathers thousands of scaled down artworks from emerging and established artists, and sells each one of the 3 x 3 inch pieces for $25. Over four hundred artists participated in this year’s exhibition, including works by Yoskay Yamamoto, James Jean, HuntzAnthony Zinonos, Hayley Powers Thornton-Kennedy, Simpsons creator Matt Groening, and many, many more. Although a majority of the included artists decided to simply paint or draw directly onto the miniature canvas, others like Sean Chao add their own spin, placing a miniature clay raccoon through a small hole in the orange paper as if the sculpture is bursting through.

Despite the creative takes on the exhibition’s premise, each artist starts with the same prompt and medium, and their work is sold for the same flat fee. “I think Post-its are great since they’re ubiquitous items that people doodle on and at the same time provides a great medium that confines but at the same time challenges,” Giant Robot owner Eric Nakamura told My Modern Met.

Post-It Show 14 ended earlier this month, but you can still browse works created for the exhibition on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

Work by Sean Chao, image via @giantrobot

Work by Sean Chao, image via @giantrobot

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post-it by Huntz

Post-it by Huntz

Image by @apbozalis

Image by @apbozalis

Image by Mark Toddy, post-its by Anthony Zinonos

Image by Mark Todd, post-its by Anthony Zinonos

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post It Show 14 installation, image via @giantrobot

Post-its by Yoskay Yamamoto

Post-its by Yoskay Yamamoto

 

 



Craft

Elegant Paper Cranes Composed of Detailed Cuts, Folds, and Flowers

December 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In 2015, paper artist Cristian Marianciuc (previously) started a 1,000-day goal to create a new paper crane each day. The extravagant designs included layers of multi-color paper, detailed cuts to imitate feathers, and often gilded elements added onto the wings. After his self-imposed challenge Marianciuc has given himself more time to work on each design, allowing cranes to develop over days rather than hours. Without these constraints he is able to vary his techniques, creating increasingly difficult works that introduce more intricate cuts and folds. Marianciuc posts his cranes regularly on Instagram, in addition to selling select paper works on Etsy. (via My Modern Met)