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Craft

A Dramatic Bouquet of Paper Flowers Interprets an Ornate Pattern in Three-Dimensions

February 2, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images by Paul Zak, © Makerie Studio, shared with permission

In “Artemis,” artists Julie Wilkinson and Joyanne Horscroft translate the moody, floral pattern of House of Hackney’s wallpaper into a stunning, three-dimensional bouquet. The sculptural work is a tribute to the designer’s classic motif, which has the same name, and took weeks for the duo to render digitally before crafting with jewel-toned and embellished paper. “We just had to pay very close attention to what we saw as the original mood and intention and draw on expanding that feeling,” Horscroft tells Colossal.

The result is a dramatic interpretation that’s crafted with painstaking detail, including thickly layered petals and woven leaves. “To us, each flower head is its own microcosm, with its own set of rules and expression, yet it’s clear they belong in the same universe. They feel like planets in a solar system or different chocolates in a box—and there’s something really appealing about that! Different… but the same,” Horscroft says.

Split between London and Oslo, the duo leads Makerie Studio (previously), which is known for its meticulous commercial, editorial, and creative projects crafted entirely from paper. See more of the pair’s sprawling installations and smaller works on Behance and Instagram.

 

 

 



Craft Design

Laser-Cut Paper Coils Into Intricate Vessels That Contrast Human Touch and Technology

January 25, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images © Ibbini Studio, shared with permission

Human hands and machines converge in the meticulous process behind Ibbini Studio’s radial vessels. Collaborating since 2017, Abu Dhabi-based artist Julia Ibbini and computer scientist Stephane Noyer craft intricate sculptures informed by geometric principles and the divide between digital and analog techniques. The multi-faceted, sequential design culminates in Symbio Vessels, an exquisite series of works that wind from base to mouth in an algorithmically defined pattern.

To create the coiled containers, the artists first draw organic structures that mimic botanics and various tessellations before turning them over to custom parametric design software. This program refines and renders the original work in three-dimensions and develops the vessel’s final shape. Once a laser cuts out the individual rings from archival paper or card—watch this meticulous process in the video below—the pair glues the layers together, forming vases that spiral upward. “The final pieces display an idea of contrasts and collaboration,” the studio says. “The flaws which come with the human hand contribute to the beautiful end result.”

Beyond their delicately layered pieces, Ibbini and Noyer also construct a range of ornate works that evoke historical motifs, many of which you can see on their site and Instagram.

 

 

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Craft

This Elaborately Armored Samurai Was Folded From A Single Sheet of Paper

January 16, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images © Juho Könkkölä, shared with permission

Juho Könkkölä spent upwards of 50 hours scoring and folding just one sheet of Wenzhou rice paper to create this painstakingly detailed samurai complete with plated armor, traditional helmet, and sword. Beginning with a 95 x 95-centimeter page, the 23-year-old Finnish artist used a combination of wet and dry origami techniques to shape the 28-centimeter-tall warrior of his own design. “There are several hundreds of steps to fold it from the square and there are probably thousands of individual folds,” he said in a statement, noting that crafting the geometric patterns for the armor was the most difficult. “The asymmetry in the design allowed me to include (a) sword on only one arm while being able to make the character look symmetric.”

Könkkölä documented his folding process in the video below, and check out his Instagram for a wide-ranging collection of origami figures. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 

 



Art

Paper Torsos Covered with Ancient Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei Reimagine Femininity

December 3, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Peng Wei, courtesy of Tina Keng Gallery, shared with permission

Through delicately layered flax and cotton paper, Peng Wei (previously) reconceptualizes common notions of femininity. The Chinese artist casts figurative sculptures depicting only the human torso, which are shapely in front and abstractly gathered in back. Inky tableaus of spectral figures, scenes of war, and domestic tasks all evoking ancient Chinese narratives—like Paragons of Feminine Virtue by Ming-dynasty thinker Lv Kun and Qing-dynasty novelist Pu Songling’s Strange Tales from the Chinese Studio—envelop the exterior. Combined with evocative poses, Peng’s freehand paintings subvert traditional understandings of women’s roles by removing their original context and displaying them anew.

Many of the delicately sculpted works shown here are part of Feminine Space, a collection that “privileges the female vantage point,” a statement says. Peng’s “stance is less an insouciant look from afar than an earnest gaze that pierces through the ancient works of Chinese literature.” If you’re in Taiwan, Feminine Space is on view through January 30, 2021, at Tina Keng Gallery. Otherwise, explore more of Peng’s work on Artsy.

 

 

 



Art

Daily Newspapers Are Meticulously Cut into Lace Collages by Artist Myriam Dion

November 30, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Floristic procession – California Blazes, The Wall Street Journal, Saturday / Sunday, August 22-23,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, 84 centimeters diameter. All images © Myriam Dion, shared with permission

For Myriam Dion, a newspaper’s narrative qualities go beyond the text on the page. The Montreal-based artist accentuates the daily briefs and profiles in publications like The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, and Le Monde by overlaying broadsheets with painstakingly cut newsprint. Brilliantly hued flowers veil an issue focused on the wildfires raging across California, while masked subjects appear in the foreground of a piece about the post-COVID economy. Each tableau centers on one narrative, supporting the journalism with intricate motifs and trimmed photographs spread across the unfolded issue.

Masking the text-based print with color and woven sections has been a recent addition to Dion’s practice. “This operation often doubles or triples the working time, but it helps solidify the works (which are already quite fragile) and gives more depth and possibilities to the patterns that I choose and invent,” she writes, noting that weaving thin strips through whole editions visually aligns her works more closely with fiber arts.

More often utilizing vintage copies of North American newspapers than she had previously, the artist has identified a through-line in many of the editions. “For a long time, and even today, the print media has been a forum articulated by and for the male sex, where women have occupied a limited place, and interestingly enough, the newspaper articles I have accumulated document the perception of women in the mass media over the last century,” she says.

Dion will be an artist in residence at the NARS Foundation in Brooklyn in 2021, where she plans to create 8-10 new pieces that merge these historic narratives with traditionally feminine art forms, like lacework and embroidery. The idea is subversive and pays “homage to the female public figures represented in these old newspapers, but more particularly to ordinary women to whom the recognition of any artistic contribution, both from a technical and conceptual point of view, has long been denied by the politics of art.”

View more of Dion’s elaborately collaged projects on her site and Instagram.

 

“Red Square, Moscow – Containment compliance is controlled thanks to an ‘intelligent surveillance system,’ March 31, 2020, Le Devoir,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, Japanese paper weaving, 60.5 x 59 centimeters

Detail of “Madrid, martyr capital of a grieving Spain, Le Monde, Saturday, April 4, 2020,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, 55.5 x 37.5 centimeters

Detail of “On a marche sur la lune, La Presse, Monday, July 21, 1969,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, Japanese paper weaving, gold and copper leaf, 91 x 63 centimeters

“Coronavirus – China’s risky plan to revive the economy, Financial Times, 11 March 2020,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, Japanese paper weaving, 30.5 x 46 centimeters

Detail of “Coronavirus – China’s risky plan to revive the economy, Financial Times, 11 March 2020,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, Japanese paper weaving, 30.5 x 46 centimeters

“On a marche sur la lune, La Presse, Monday, July 21, 1969,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, Japanese paper weaving, gold and copper leaf, 91 x 63 centimeters

Detail of “Floristic procession – California Blazes, The Wall Street Journal, Saturday / Sunday, August 22-23,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, 84 centimeters diameter

“Madrid, martyr capital of a grieving Spain, Le Monde, Saturday, April 4, 2020,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, 55.5 x 37.5 centimeters

Detail of “Madrid, martyr capital of a grieving Spain, Le Monde, Saturday, April 4, 2020,” collage of newspapers and Japanese papers cut with X-Acto knife, 55.5 x 37.5 centimeters

 

 



Animation Music

A Series of Animated Paper Video Games Evokes Digital Nostalgia

November 25, 2020

Grace Ebert

Perhaps no video game has evidenced the necessity of escapism in modern life more than Animal Crossing at the beginning of the pandemic. Players worldwide dove into the fictional universe to avoid the anxiety of daily life, a coping mechanism that a new animation by Austin-based creator Eric Power beautifully encapsulates. Set to a new song by Mixtape for the Milky Way, the short history is an ode to the charming simulation and a slew of its predecessors and contemporaries. The nostalgic video chronicles the evolution of video games—from Pacman and Asteroid to Cuphead, Limbo, and GRIS’s surreal watercolor landscapes—through a series of vintage television sets and classic simulations recreated entirely from paper.

For more of Power’s animated works, visit Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 

 

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