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Art

Swirling Networks of Sliced Paper Emerge From Altered Secondhand Books by Barbara Wildenboer

September 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Barbara Wildenboer (previously) delicately cuts and extracts the pages of old books to produce sculptural explorations of the contents inside. Thinly sliced paper fragments frame world maps found in old atlases or appear like a nervous system in an altered copy of Functional Neuroanatomy. The works are part of an ongoing project titled the Library of the Infinitesimally Small and Unimaginable Large, to which she has been contributing altered books since 2011. The series uses the site of the library as a metaphor for the larger universe, while also focusing on the decrease of printed materials as a result of the digital age.

“Through the act of altering books and other paper based objects the intention is to draw emphasis to our understanding of history as mediated through text or language and our understanding of the abstract terms of science through metaphor,” Wildenboer explains on her website.

The Cape Town-based artist sources her books and maps from secondhand bookshops and flea markets from around the world, looking specifically for publications that have illustrations, paper quality, and subject matter that might be interesting to slice and transform. This November she will open a solo exhibition at Everard Read Gallery in Johannesburg which will be followed by another solo exhibition in March 2019 at the their London location. You can see more of her paper-based sculptures and collages on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Craft Illustration

365 Days of Miniature Cut Paper Egrets, Sparrows, Pelicans and Other Birds

September 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Ruby Throated Hummingbird

India-based cut paper artists Nayan Shrimali and Vaishali Chudasama have set out to construct 365 miniature bird species by the end of 2018. To form each work, the pair begins by cutting feathers, beaks, and talons from layers of paper and then using watercolor to produce further detail. Despite the works’ small size (some of the tiniest pieces measuring only 3/4 of an inch from head to tail), each bird takes four to six hours to finish depending on the extent of the bird’s colorful plumage. You can stay updated with the artists’ miniature project on Instagram, and buy tiny avian artworks by the duo on their Etsy Shop.

Snowy Egret

Snowy Egret

Raven

Raven

Baya Weaver Bird

Baya Weaver Bird

Bali Myna

Bali Myna

Indian Peafowl

Indian Peafowl

Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

Griffon Vulture

Griffon Vulture

Darter

Darter

 

 



Amazing

Cut Paper Zoetrope Reveals the Life Cycle of a Butterfly as it Rotates

August 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Veerle Coppoolse examines the life cycle of a butterfly in a handcrafted zoetrope built from finely cut paper. The analogue animation brings the metamorphosis of the extraordinary insect to life, presenting its transformation from cocoon-wrapped caterpillar to a butterfly in flight. The grey and white paper animation is a mock-up for a larger model Coppoolse is currently seeking funding for on the Netherlands-based crowdfunding site Voordekunst. She hopes to build a cocoon-shaped machine that will spin guests around the paper work to create an animation, rather than producing movement from the zoetrope itself. You can follow the process behind Coppoolse’s human-powered metamorphosis attraction on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Over Fifteen Thousand Paper Kites Create a Two-Toned Cloud Inside New York’s St. Cornelius Chapel

August 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Timothy Schenck

All images by Timothy Schenck

A mass of circular black paper and bamboo kites merges with a collection of identically designed white ones inside Governors Island’s St. Cornelius Chapel in an installation titled The Eclipse. Created by artist Jacob Hashimoto (previously), the paper orbs hang from the ceiling by pieces of string to comprise a layered formation that appears like roving waves or clouds. This is the second iteration of the labor-intensive installation, which premiered at the Palazzo Flangini during the 57th Venice Biennale.

An additional large-scale work by Hashimoto titled Never Comes Tomorrow, which consists of hundred of wood cubes and colorful steel funnels, is installed outside of the chapel in Liggett Hall Archway. The dual installations can be visited on Governors Island seven days a week through October 31, 2018. You can find specific hours for the installation on the Governors Island website, and see more of Hashimoto’s works on his website. (via Fubiz)

 

 



Colossal Design

Origami Wrap Turns Disposable Gift-Wrapping Paper Into DIY Crafts

August 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Fun fact: if every American wrapped just three gifts per year using reusable or reused materials, we would save enough paper to cover 45,000 football fields. And it doesn’t just have to be last week’s Sunday comics: this clever wrapping paper is the gift that keeps on giving, six times over! Each 20 x 30 inch sheet is covered with directions to turn it into a dog, frog, flower, balloon, fish, and crane. Origami Wrap is designed by ILOVEHANDLES and sold in sets of five sheets. Find it in The Colossal Shop.

 

 

 



Art Craft

Bubble-Covered Flowers and Ornate Animals Formed From Cut Paper by Pippa Dyrlaga

August 1, 2018

Andrew LaSane

All images © Pippa Dyrlaga

The most basic instrument in the hands of a master can produce awe-inspiring results. For Yorkshire-based artist and printmaker Pippa Dyrlaga (previously), that instrument is a common blade handle equipped with fine point blades. The resulting works of art are incredibly detailed paper cuts of plants, animals, and abstract designs with hand-replicated patterns and variations in line width that give them dimensionality and bring the flat images to life.

Pippa only began paper cutting in 2010, a year before completing her Masters degree in Art and Design and Curation at Leeds Metropolitan University. On finding inspiration and imagery that would work well for her style and craft, Pippa tells Colossal that ideas tend to flow from her surroundings and from other projects. “Most of the time one piece will lead to another, but I sometimes get an idea that I just want to try out, something I have been thinking of for a while. I have always lived in quite inspiring and green places, filled with local wildlife and flora, and much of my inspiration stems from being outside and enjoying it, and feeling like a part of it.”

While all of her pieces are meticulous, Pippa says that apart from a basic layout sketch, not a lot goes into the planning phase. “I prefer the pieces where I work on the design as I am cutting them out! I will have a detail or a general idea of what I want it to look like in my head, and I will create the full image whilst I am working on it, in smaller sections, so it develops quite organically.” For larger pieces that do require some planning, she will sometimes make smaller versions first to see how the details will work. “I quite like not knowing what it will look like until its finished,” she tells Colossal.

As for how those details are achieved, Pippa assured us that the blades and handle are the main weapons in her arsenal. “Papercutting doesn’t require anything fancy,” she said. “The tools are as simple as the medium. The rest is practice!” She does, however, have personal preferences when it comes to the paper she cuts (good quality, acid-free, and from sustainable sources), and there are a few measures taken to ensure that the works stay flat, dry, and away from the harsh sun. “Paper cuts are surprisingly strong,” Pippa said, “but they can’t take much damage so they do have to be handled and stored safely, just like any paper.”

To see more of Pippa Dyrlaga’s work, follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Dizzying Scrolls of Hand-Colored Paper Form Bas-Relief Sculptures by Hadieh Shafie

July 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Hadieh Shafie uses carefully hand-dyed and rolled paper to form dense surfaces. In some works, each set of concentric circles is an equal depth, creating small planes in the topography of the finished piece. Her ‘Spike’ series features sharp spiraled cones that protrude toward the viewer. In addition to the colorful edging, calligraphy is also incorporated on the paper scrolls. Most recently, Shafie has been adding an additional dimension by dipping the finished scrolls into ink to create the appearance of shadows. The artist describes her process in an artist statement:

On the surface, what the viewer sees are the fore-edges of miniature scrolls made of strips of paper. Using a limited color palette, each strip of paper is dyed with acrylic pigments, and then rolled by hand, one upon another, to create a multitude of color combinations for each emerging scroll. The rolling process places razor thin edges of color closely together, creating a space for the viewer’s eye to blend adjoining colors.

Shafie was born in Tehran, Iran and is currently based in Brooklyn. The artist shares with Colossal that her work is “a visual response to the emancipating effect [of] books and poetry” that she has experienced. Shafie holds two MFA degrees and her work is in collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, among others. You can see more of her intricate paper work on her website and Instagram. (via #WOMENSART)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Sailing Ship Kite