performance art

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Art

A Fleeting Dandelion Wish Processing Facility Appears For Two Days Outside of Los Angeles

May 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

A recent two-day installation in Commerce, California afforded visitors an opportunity to evaluate and deposit their secret wishes. Dandelions, which was organized by the anonymous artist group The Art Department, took place in an administrative building at the Laguna Bell electrical substation from May 11-12, 2019. The cavernous space was transformed into a secret wish processing facility, where visitors submitted their wishes for questioning and analysis before receiving a dandelion to send their wish in a whoosh down a chute of either slam dunks or long shots. Writer Renée Reizman, who had a chance to visit the fleeting facility, explains the guided performance art in depth on Hyperallergic. Explore more of The Art Department’s previous projects on their website and Instagram.

Photo: Renée Reizman for Hyperallergic

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Renée Reizman for Hyperallergic

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Renée Reizman for Hyperallergic

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

Photo: Michèle M Waite, courtesy the Art Department

 

 



Amazing

A Specially Adapted Underwater Wheelchair Brings Artist Sue Austin Beneath the Earth’s Surface

November 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

British artist Sue Austin creates multimedia, performance, and installation art, using her wheelchair as a means to explore new patterns of movement. In 2012, Austin was commissioned to create a series of multimedia events as part of that year’s Cultural Olympiad, in conjunction with the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. The result, titled “Creating the Spectacle!” is a spectacular immersive dance performance and underwater exploration, which was shot near Sharm el Sheik, Egypt by Norman Lomax of Moving Content. You can watch a portion of the film below.

In the film, Austin uses her arms to guide her through the water, and she wears a summery dress with her long hair flowing freely, as she navigates through schools of fish and past massive coral reefs. Her underwater wheelchair is adapted from a standard-issue National Health Service chair, with battery powered propellers and perspex aerofoils to control turns. Austin hopes that the adaptations will be more widely available at diving centers in the future to make diving more inclusive.

A statement on her website explains, “she aims to find dramatic and powerful ways to re-position disability and Disability Arts as the ‘Hidden Secret’. She argues that this ‘secret’, if explored, valued and then shared, can act to heal the divisions created in the social psyche by cultural dichotomies that define the ‘disabled’ as ‘other’.”

Austin first performed with her underwater wheelchair in Dorset, U.K. in 2012, and has since performed, shown films, and spoken around the world about her art practice. You can learn more about Austin and her organization Freewheeling, on her website, and watch her TED Talk here. (via #WOMENSART)

 

 



Art Design

ReActor: a Tilting House That Shifts and Spins Based on its Inhabitants’ Movements

September 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photography: Richard Barnes & Dora Somosi

In the rolling hills of upstate New York at the outdoor sculpture park Art Omi, artist duo Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley (previously) created a fully functional house with a special slant. The project, called ReActor, is a 42 by 8-foot rotating home that balances on a single 14-foot tall concrete column. Movements inside the dwelling, as well as outside forces like gusts of wind, cause the structure to gently tilt and rotate. In the summer of 2016, Schweder and Shelley inhabited the home for five days, and their movements toward or away from the house’s fulcrum caused constant motion. Because the home is constructed with Philip Johnson-esque levels of floor-to-ceiling windows, the artists’ interior activities were visible to Omi attendees.

Schweder and Shelley have collaborated since 2007, focusing on “performance architecture,” a practice of designing, building, and living in structures for the purpose of public observation and dialogue.  Though the artists are currently residing in (presumably) more stable housing, the tilting house remained on view at Omi until August 2018. (via Yellowtrace)

 

 



Art

Human Limbs Mysteriously Emerge from Marble Slabs in Milena Naef’s Performative Sculptures

June 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographs by Lisa-Marie Vlietstra and Alice Trimouille

Milena Naef juxtaposes the manufactured shapes of marble slabs with the organic forms of the human figure in her performative sculptural works. In her series ‘Fleeting Parts,’ the artist removes portions of Cristallina marble to create openings that are perfectly shaped to allow arms, legs, and torsos to emerge.

Naef, who lives and works in Amsterdam, describes her work in a statement: “Once tangible, the interaction with the concrete material allows for a space to ‘open’ in which a given context can be changed. The body itself with its physical presence and its absence becomes a vital aspect of the work. When do structures inhibit or liberate us and our physical form? What is the consequence of the fact that our bodies are always ‘filling space’?”

The artist’s solo show is on view through August 20, 2018, at Studio Oliver Gustav in Copenhagen, and she will also be exhibiting work at the Garage Rotterdam museum from August 31 to October 28, 2018. You can see more of her work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

 

 



Art Dance

Dancers Demonstrate the Perpetual ‘Mechanics of History’ in a Performance by Yoann Bourgeois

October 26, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Visitors to the Panthéon in Paris earlier this month have been encountering an unusual sight. For about ten days in October, multi-disciplinary movement artist Yoann Bourgeois installed a rotating circular stairway with a discrete trampoline at its center, and a small cast of anonymously clothed dancers trudged up the steps, each one falling in succession onto the trampoline and seamlessly rebounding back on to the stairs.

The installation was strategically placed over the Panthéon’s Foucault Pendulum, which was devised by French physicist Léon Foucault and offers an easy-to-understand demonstration of Earth’s rotation. Commonly replicated at science museums around the world, the Panthéon’s pendulum has been the most well-known since its inception in 1851. According to co-producers Théâtre de la Ville, Bourgeois’s work is a meditation on Earth’s gravity.

Entitled ‘La mécanique de l’Histoire’ (The Mechanics of History), the performance is a part of the Monuments En Movement series at the Panthéon. Video by Tony Whitfield.

 

 



Art

Living Works That Flatten Three-Dimensional Scenes Into Two-Dimensional Photographs by Alexa Meade

May 25, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

AlexaMeade_09

All images © Alexa Meade

Flattening three-dimensional installations into two-dimensional images, Alexa Meade compresses reality by covering models in specifically applied paint, making sure to focus on painted shadows and highlights to transform her posed subjects into paintings. Meade’s works, which she has referred to as “reverse trompe l’oeil” combine installation, painting, photography, and even performance, as many of her works are done live and with little room for error. Mistakes made during her painting process however, often add to the overall dynamism of the piece, creating an aesthetic tension for each of her living works.

“There are so many things going on at once in my process that something is always bound to go wrong,” Meade recently told Colossal. “Having to problem solve in the moment and hack together a solution will typically result in me bringing something new and fresh to the painting that I didn’t intend or expect. The artwork often turns out so much better than I had originally envisioned.”

Often these errors are due to the fact that Meade is creating her works on live models, and unlike swathes of canvas, her medium has interests, personalities, and needs which influence the work. “If you are a painter painting on canvas you don’t have to care about its feelings or emotions,” said Meade, “the canvas doesn’t have to go to the bathroom.”

Meade didn’t always start out as an artist, in fact she studied politics and worked in Washington D.C. before experimenting with her current practice. “I discovered my method completely by accident,” said Meade. “Then I had to actually teach myself out to paint.” Now Meade is a represented artist in three countries and is often asked to do live painting performances, such as this month during FORM Arcosanti, an outdoor micro arts and music festival which we attended with WeTransfer and came across Meade’s work. You can see more of her process and images on her Facebook and Instagram.

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Alexa Meade’s live painting during FORM Arcosanti, base makeup by Josephine Lee

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Art

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days

March 6, 2014

Christopher Jobson

hamster-1

Photo by Scott Lynch courtesy Gothamist

hamster-2

Photo by Scott Lynch courtesy Gothamist

Artists Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley have constructed a giant wood hamster wheel with a 25-foot-diameter where the duo are currently living and working for 10 days until March 9 at the Boiler in Williamsburg, Brookyln. Why? Because …art! Titled In Orbit, the piece is a continuation of numerous installations where the artists live together in public spaces including Counterweight Roommmate and Stability which they refer to as “architectural performance pieces.”

For In Orbit, the rotating house is designed so that Shelley can live on the exterior of the wheel nearly 30 ft. off the floor, while Schweder lives on the inside due to a fear of heights. Through coordinated movements the pair can rotate the wheel to access beds, desks, chairs and even a kitchen-bathroom combo. You can learn more over at Gothamist and Peirogi Gallery. Photos and video by Scott Lynch. (via Laughing Squid)