porcelain

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Art

Murmuration: 10,000 Porcelain Birds Create a Calligraphic Landscape at the National Gallery of Victoria

May 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All images courtesy of National Gallery of Victoria

As part of a new large-scale exhibit at Australia’s National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang (previously) has created a swarm of 10,000 porcelain birds, titled Murmuration (Landscape). The multi-part winter exhibition at the museum combines Cai’s contemporary work with the display of a selection of China’s famed ancient terracotta warriors. Cai, who is best known for his enormous artworks that utilize fireworks, assembled the vast quantity of birds and smudged them black with gunpowder. The installation fills an entire gallery and the birds are suspended to create a 3D impression of a calligraphic drawing of Mount Li, where the tomb of the ancient warriors was located. Terracotta Warriors and Cai Guo-Qiang opens to the public today and is on view through October 13, 2019. Watch a time-lapse of the labor-intensive installation here and explore more of the artist’s diverse works on Instagram.

Photo: Tobias Titz

 

 



Art Craft

Sharp-Edged Porcelain Vessels by Martha Pachón Rodríguez

May 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Ceramic artist Martha Pachón Rodríguez’s sculptural vessels juxtapose an extremely clean, refined construction with sharp repeated shapes and jarring color combinations. Using a mix of uncolored and pigmented porcelain, Rodríguez layers thin triangles or spikes that resemble quills or teeth, to frame gaping holes in her rounded vessels. In a statement on the artist’s website, she describes her sculptures as a “mixture of human eroticism with animal nature.” In addition to her sculptural body of work, Rodríguez also builds suspended installations and crafts fine jewelry as part of her ceramic practice. The artist was born and educated in Colombia, and continued her studies in Italy. Rodríguez is currently the Art Director of Faenza Art Ceramic Center in Italy. Explore more of the artist’s works on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Ornate Birds and Sea Creatures Spring to Life With Environmental Embellishments of Flowers and Foliage

October 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Ellen Jewett (previously) continues to create sculptures of animals from the land and sea, crafting realistic depictions with a surreal edge. Each porcelain creature features elaborate elements that connect the animal back to its natural environment—such as green leaves that sprout from the wings of a black cockatoo, or tiny yellow fish that are found along the spines of her ornately patterned seahorses.

After she forms each sea turtle, octopus, or fish from porcelain, Jewett free-models a wire armature by hand and coats the piece in polymer. This addition allows her to connect detailed elements such as flowers and other fauna to the animals fins or claws. Her solo exhibition On Wilderness is on view at the Ottawa School of Art’s Main Gallery in Ontario, Canada through November 18, 2018. Her work is also being exhibited in the group exhibition Nature Imagined at the Wilding Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang, California through January 2019. You can learn more about her process by following her work on Instagram.

 

 



Art

A Whirling Porcelain Coral Reef Draws Attention to the Cost of Climate Change

October 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" (2018), Glazed stoneware + porcelain, 846 x 570 x 50 cm, image by Amanda Brooks

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” (2018), Glazed stoneware + porcelain, 846 x 570 x 50 cm, photograph by Amanda Brooks

The latest installation by ceramicist and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison (previously) is Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)a porcelain coral arrangement produced for the US Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. The site-specific work features a vibrant cluster of coral structures at its center which turn stark white the further they are placed from the installation’s core. This shifting gradient references the rapid devastation caused to reefs as temperature levels rise and force corals to lose their colorful algae.

This installation is a celebration of Indonesia’s coral reefs, while also pinpointing the human-caused damage that infects the vibrant systems. “Corals, anemones, sponges and other reef-dwelling invertebrates coalesce into a cyclone-like spiral with colorful healthy corals at the eye of the storm, their tentacles and branches dancing in the current,” explains Mattison. “Toward the edges and tail of the swirling constellation, corals sicken and bleach, exposing their sterile white skeletons—a specter of what could be lost from climate change. Yet at its heart the reef remains healthy, resilient and harmonious.”

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Amanda Brooks

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Amanda Brooks

Indonesia is located at the heart of what is called the “Coral Triangle” or “Amazon of the Sea.” This environment is host to more invertebrate species than can be found anywhere else on the planet, in addition to thousands of species of fish which thrive in the rich ecosystem. Mattison hopes that her handmade constructions of the Coral Triangle’s diverse specimens produces an excitement in viewers while sparking an interest to protect the delicate balance found in Indonesia’s coral systems.

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Courtney Mattison

Mattison is exhibiting another recent installation titled Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI) in the group show Endangered Species: Artists on the Frontline of Biodiversity, curated by Barbara Matilsky, at the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, Washington through January 6, 2019. Mattison will travel to Bali at the end of October to unveil a 60-foot-long community-based coral installation she designed for the Coral Triangle Center in Sanur, Bali titled Semesta Terumbu Karang—Coral Universe. The work features over 2000 elements sculpted by a team of over 300 volunteers, coral reef conservationists, and Balinese artisans. You can see further conservation-based projects by Mattison on her website and Instagram.

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)” (2018), Glazed stoneware + porcelain, 230 x 260 x 50 cm

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Courtney Mattison

"Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)" (detail)

“Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)” (detail)

"Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)" (detail)

“Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)” (detail)

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" (2018)

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” (2018)

 

 



Art

Fresco-Inspired Porcelain Bowls Formed From Balloons by Guy Van Leemput

August 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Ceramicist and mathematician Guy Van Leemput forms textured bowls by drafting interlocking lines, abnormally shaped circles, and other designs on the surface of balloons. The artist begins by adding a porcelain stamp to the bottom of his rubber mold and then working his way in a circular motion upward. Although his designs are geometrically inspired, he creates each piece based on intuition rather than a pre-determined template. When finished, the pots are so translucent they appear as if they were formed from paper. This aesthetic, both in the works’ color and technique, was inspired by ancient Italian fresco paintings, and has been a part of his practice since 2014.

Currently Van Leemput’s work is included in the Porcelain Biennale at the Albrechtsburg Castle in Meissen, Germany, the city where European porcelain was first composed. The exhibition opened earlier this month and runs through November 4, 2018. You can take a look inside the artist’s studio and handbuilt kiln in a video made for the Dutch ceramics magazine de kleine K below. (via Art is a Way)

 

 



Art

New Contemplative Female Busts Cast from Porcelain, Polymer Gypsum, and Resin by Gosia

May 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Toronto-based sculptor Gosia (previously) constructs minimally-hued porcelain busts of contemplative female forms from a variety of materials, including ceramic, polymer gypsum, resin, and most recently, porcelain. Her very first experiment with the new medium is included in her current solo exhibition, Beneath the Surface, at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia. The work is an imperfect cast, a mistake which Gosia details in the text below.

Imperfect is one of those ‘happy accident’ pieces,” she explains. “My intention for it was completely different, but when it came out of the mold it had an indentation on the left side of the face… It made me think a lot about the world’s obsession (and my own) with perfection and what we might be missing because of it. It felt good to let go of control and for once let my art do its own thing.”

Other new works include Overflow, which features a female figure inside of an elongated cube. The subject’s long hair flows into the pedestal’s depths—a structure that seems to at once support and swallow the imbedded figure. Two other pieces are each titled Beneath the Surface, and were created with the combination of opaque and lucid materials. Translucent resin composes the bottom the sculptures’ faces to their nose, making it appear as if each have dipped partially underwater.

“Beneath the Surface” runs through June 16 at Paradigm Gallery. Gosia’s first European show, “The Windows of the Soul,” opened this past weekend at Dorothy Circus in London. You can see more of Gosia’s work on her website and Instagram.

"Overflow"

“Overflow”

“Beneath the Surface”

"Beneath the Surface"

“Beneath the Surface”

“Moon”

"Imperfect"

“Imperfect”

 

 



Art

Alarming Juxtapositions of Human and Natural Elements in Sculptures by Kate MacDowell

March 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Portland-based artist Kate MacDowell (previously) continues to construct discomfiting combinations of human and wildlife elements in her porcelain sculptures. She builds each piece by hand, and often layers in details after hollowing out the main form, whether it is a fox’s body encasing a human skull or a human brain filled with flora and fauna.  MacDowell describes her choice of material:

I chose porcelain for its luminous and ghostly qualities as well as its strength and ability to show fine texture.  It highlights both the impermanence and fragility of natural forms in a dying ecosystem, while paradoxically, being a material that can last for thousands of years and is historically associated with high status and value.

The artist’s work is included in a group show at the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, NY, which is open through April 15, 2018, and she is also leading a week-long workshop on porcelain sculpting at Idyllwild Arts in California in June 2018. You can see more of her work on her website and Facebook page.