posters and prints

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Illustration

Life on the Line: 10 Artists Spread Mental Health Awareness Across Toronto's Subway

November 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Birdcage” by Marcia Diaz. All images © Twentytwenty Arts, shared with permission

Through an eclectic array of illustrations and photographs, ten Canada-based artists are collaborating in an effort to boost awareness of mental health struggles. Life on the Line is a new public art campaign spearheaded by Twentytwenty Arts that recently installed 200 posters across the Toronto TTC Subway. From portraits to abstract renderings, the vivid works will be on display through January 16, 2021.

Each piece is informed by the artists’ own experiences with mental health issues, including depression, agoraphobia, and anxiety, among others, that the storytelling platform Unsinkable will share throughout the coming weeks. “We hope that this campaign will bring people joy and comfort in an otherwise stressful and anxious time (especially if they have to be on public transit!),” Megan Kee, the director and founder of Twentytwenty Arts, tells Colossal.

If you’re not hopping on the subway in Toronto any time soon, 50 limited-edition prints—which are signed and numbered—of each of the works are available in Twentytwenty Arts’ shop. Seventy-five percent of all sales will be donated to the Canadian Mental Health Association’s Family Outreach and Response Program. You also can follow Twentytwenty Arts’ outreach efforts on Instagram.

 

“The Fatherless Son” by Alexander Robinson

Left: “Load” by Dina Belaia. RIght: “I Remember It All” by Eric Pause

“I’M ON TOP OF IT!” by Faye Harnest

“Empty” by Julieta Christy

Left: “Untitled” by Ramune Luminaire. Right: “Agoraphobia” by Seri Stinson

 

 



Design History Illustration Music

Inside Information: Cross-Sections of Retro Technology Reveal Historical Moments of Iconic Objects

October 2, 2020

Christopher Jobson

The distinctive Arriflex 35 IIC is one of the most significant motion picture cameras of all time, and a favourite of the Hollywood new wave of cinematographers of the 60’s ad 70’s. The hand held camera was famously beloved by Stanley Kubrick whose 1971 cult classic, A Clockwork Orange, was shot almost entirely on the Arri 35 IIC.

As part of an ongoing series titled Inside Information, UK-based design studio Dorothy explores some of the most iconic designs in the areas of film, music, personal computing, and fashion through clever “cutaway” infographics. Each illustration reveals a miniature isometric world packed with historical moments from famous concerts that used the Vox AC30 amplifier to films that utilized the Arriflex 35 IIC handheld camera, which transformed movies forever. All five of the Inside Information graphics are available as three-color litho prints on its website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

Released in 1959 to meet the demand for louder amplifiers, the Vox AC30 was quickly adopted as the amp of choice for bands like The Beatles, The Kinks and The Stones, helping to define the sound of the ‘British Invasion’ when the popularity of British rock ’n’ roll bands spread to the States. Its appeal has continued through the decades with bands like Queen, U2, The Smiths, Oasis, Blur, Radiohead, Arctic Monkeys all counted as loyal Vox fans.

The Nike Air Max is a bona fide design classic. Designed by Tinker Hatfield and released in 1987 it has, in its 30 plus years of existence, established a cult following. Inspired by the architecture of the Centre Pompidou, it was the first trainer to offer a window to the sole, kickstarting a revolution in sneaker design.

The Minimoog was the world’s first portable (and affordable) synthesiser. Billed as ’The Moog for the road’, it revolutionized music, acquired a cult-like following (which it still enjoys to this day) and quickly became the most popular synth of its time.

The Apple Macintosh (later know as the Macintosh 128k) was launched with an Orwell inspired commercial directed by Ridley Scott, and introduced to the world by Steve Jobs on 24th January 1984. It blew our tiny little minds and for many heralded the beginning of a lifelong love affair with all things Apple.

 

 



Design History Science

An Interactive Display Color-Codes Hundreds of Historical Mineral Illustrations

August 14, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Nicholas Rougeux

Throughout the early 19th century, naturalist, illustrator, and mineralogist James Sowerby published 718 color renderings of minerals, which he accompanied with their characteristics, classifications, and other names. A Chicago-based designer recently reproduced those centuries-old illustrations in an expansive interactive arrangement. Nicholas Rougeux (previously) color-coded Sowerby’s depictions—a tedious process that required the designer to restore each mineral to its original hue and took four months to complete—from two compendia, British Mineralogy and Exotic Mineralogy, which were published between 1802 and 1817. The result is a magnifiable exhibit that captures the incredible diversity and detail of Sowerby’s geological studies.

Check out the eye-catching display on Rougeux’s site, and for those who want a physical copy categorizing the diverse materials, the designer is selling posters, too. Keep up with his contemporary approaches to historical scholarship on Twitter, Behance, and Instagram. (via Kottke)

 

 

 



Design

Hundreds of Symbols From Prehistory to Modern Day Comprise a Gold 'S' Screenprint by Seb Lester

August 4, 2020

Grace Ebert

“S” (2020), metallic rose gold screenprint on black Plike art paper, 330 gsm, 24.4 x 24.4 inches. All images © Seb Lester, shared with permission

Centered on the letter “S,” an anachronistic print from Seb Lester (previously) blends hundreds of symbols into one embellished form. Rendered in metallic on black paper, the typographic piece captures an incredibly long timeline, from prehistory to the Dark Ages to the Renaissance to present day. Look closely and you’ll spot snippets of cave paintings, Egyptian hieroglyphics, emojis, and modern logos.

Based in Lewes, England, the artist and calligrapher channeled the heavily detailed marginalia and flourishes of illuminated manuscripts. “I have spent two decades studying the most beautiful examples of intricate letterform and ornamental design I can find. This letter ‘S’ is arguably the most intricate letterform that has ever been drawn,” he shares with Colossal.

Lester released a limited run of 150 gold screenprints, which currently are available in his shop. Check out the video below to see all of the piece’s gleaming intricacies, and follow the artist on Instagram to keep up with his latest releases.

 

 

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A post shared by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

 

 



History Photography

Magnum’s Print Sale Offers More Than 100 Archival Photographs Benefitting the NAACP

July 27, 2020

Grace Ebert

Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos. The Danish artist, Olafur Eliasson’s installation of a huge artificial sun in the Turbine Hall. Tate Modern. London. Great Britain. 2003.

In collaboration with Vogue, Magnum Photos just launched a massive print sale with half of all proceeds being donated to the NAACP. Included in the collection of archival photographs are Philippe Halsman’s iconic portrait of Angela Davis, Thomas Hoepker’s shot of Muhammed Ali, and dozens of other images that fall under the theme of solidarity. Many of the pieces explore the power of human bonds, about which organizers say:

While acknowledging the daunting divisions and fault-lines running through society, the selection will examine a simultaneous human yearning for commune and connection, aiming to explore the strength of both the individual and collective, as well as the interdependence of peoples around the world in the face of adversity and oppression.

All 6 x 6-inch prints are signed or estate-stamped, museum-quality, and available for $100. Find some of Colossal’s favorites below—which includes Ernest Cole’s glimpse into South African life under apartheid and Cristina de Middel’s piece that captures a Tijuana pole vaulter mid-air—and shop the full collection before the sale ends at 6 p.m. EST on August 6.

 

Alex Webb/Magnum Photos. Erie, Pennsylvania, USA. 2010. From the book The Suffering of Light.

Stuart Franklin/Magnum Photos. Cyclists in the rain. Shangai, China. 1993

Ernest Cole/Magnum Photos. South Africa. c.1965.

Cristina de Middel/Magnum Photos. Jorge Luna, a professional Mexican pole vault jumper trains by the border fence on the beach of Tijuana. Tijuana, Mexico. 2018.

Philippe Halsman/Magnum Photos. American political activist Angela Davis. Photographed by Philippe Halsman for the cover of her autobiography. USA. 1973.

Yael Martinez/Magnum Photos. The Space Between, from the series Firefly. Guerrero, Mexico. 2020.

Thomas Hoepker/Magnum Photos. Muhammad Ali, boxing world heavyweight champion showing off his right fist. Chicago, USA. 1966.

Inge Morath/Magnum Photos. Three people in a car. From the Mask Series with Saul Steinberg. New York City, USA. 1962.

Gueorgui Pinkhassov/ Magnum Photos. Hotel garden in Akasaka. Tokyo, Japan. 1996.

Jean Gaumy/Magnum Photos. On the vessel Izazuri. Gulf of Gascogne, Spain. 1996.

Alessandra Sanguinetti/Magnum Photos. Enchanting the pig. Buenos Aires, Argentina. 1999.

Katsu Naito/Vogue. A Tree Grows in Harlem. 1998

 

 



Art Illustration

Formed With Geometric Blocks of Color, Modern Women Exhibit Strength in Artist Luciano Cian's Prints

July 23, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Luciano Cian, shared with permission

Artist Luciano Cian’s latest series Geo explores the power, perseverance, and stability of contemporary women through bold colors and gesture. Simple lines and geometric shapes comprise the nondescript figures, who tend to look away from the viewer with striking facial expressions. Relying heavily on the tension between symmetry and asymmetry, Cian tells Colossal he’s inspired the aesthetics of Brazilian modernist artists like painter Athos Bulcão and architect Oscar Niemeyer. Dive into more of the Rio de Janeiro-based artist’s vibrant prints on Behance and Instagram, and check out which pieces are available to add to your collection.

 

 

 

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