sculpture

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Art Design Food

Thin Strips of Metal and Spaghetti Connect in Architectural Collars and Headdresses

April 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Fabienne.” All images © Alice Pegna, by Jacques Peg, shared with permission

Paris-based designer and artist Alice Pegna revolves her practice around structures. She’s concerned with both the relationship between individual components and how a larger framework responds to its environment, and her pieces tend to amplify the connection between adornment and the human body. “The structure is an integral part of the universe,” she tells Colossal. “It is not always visible, yet always present, material or immaterial, just like our body, our thoughts, and our life.”

This interest culminates in her architectural body of work that’s comprised of sculptural garments, headdresses, and accessories with sharp points and acute angles. Previously working primarily with uncooked spaghetti, Pegna’s new collection incorporates thin strips of metal that similarly hug the wearer’s form with geometric detail. The pieces were created in collaboration with the Phoenix Alternative Model association for Paris Fashion Week 2021 and worn by models with physical disabilities to highlight their figures. All of the works, which are photographed against stark black backdrops on minimal mannequins, rely on negative space to alter how the body is viewed without obscuring it entirely.

For more of Pegna’s intricate constructions, visit her site and Instagram.

 

“Anna”

“Barbe”

“Crete”

“Clemence”

“Crete”

“Parure”

 

 

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Art

Monumental Forms Ripple and Float in Leeroy New’s Sculptures Made from Discarded Plastics

April 5, 2022

Kate Mothes

“Balete” (2022). All images courtesy of the artist, shared with permission

Manila-based artist and designer Leeroy New challenges us to think about the waste produced from everyday materials by constructing elaborate sculptures out of discarded plastics. His large-scale works are made by cutting, twisting, and tying together found objects like water jugs, film reels, tubes, and bottles into forms that evoke a sense of  movement or migration. Embracing the exterior of a building as part of the Biennale of Sydney earlier this year, the tentacle-like public installation “Balete” was inspired by the discovery of piles of discarded irrigation hoses at recycling centers in Australia. In “Flotilla,” individual pieces are suspended from the ceiling and appear to glide past like a fleet of uncanny vessels or undersea organisms.

In 2019, the Institute for Economics and Peace reported that New’s home country of the Philippines is most at risk from the climate crisis due to rising temperatures and sea levels. Manila is second only to Tokyo as the city most affected by natural disasters. Reimagining a more positive and sustainable future for his community and the planet, New explores the culture, history, and mythology of his Philippines heritage to underscore the palpable impacts of the climate crisis.

To mark the occasion of Earth Day on April 22, a new installation sails across the courtyard of London’s Somerset House this month in the form of a fleet of arks. You can find more of the artist’s work on Instagram and his website.

 

“Balete” (2022)

“Balete” (2022)

“Balete” (2022)

Foreground: “Flotilla” (2022)

Foreground: “Flotilla” (2022)

Background: “Flotilla” (2022)

 

 



Art

Illuminated Inflatable Sculptures Populate Whimsical Wonderlands by ENESS

March 31, 2022

Grace Ebert

All photos © ENESS, shared with permission

Giant striped characters, the world’s first inflatable fountain, and a mass of towering arches occupy the otherworldly installations designed by ENESS. The Melbourne-based studio creates immersive worlds of whimsical creatures and puffy, illuminated structures that spring from the ground. Often paired with upbeat soundscapes and interactive elements like squirting water and digital eyeballs, the air-filled sculptures are arranged as wonderlands of light and color that at night, bathe the viewer in a kaleidoscopic glow of LED bulbs.

ENESS’s “Cupid’s Koi Garden” (shown below) is on view from April 12 to August 21 alongside 14 artists as part of Pop Air, a collaborative exhibition between La Villette and Balloon Museum, that occupies more than 5,000-square-meters of the Grande Halle in Paris. Follow where the studio’s radiant inflatables are traveling next on Instagram.

 

“Cupid’s Koi Garden.” Photo by Sam Roberts

“Cupid’s Koi Garden.” Photo by Diana Snape

“Cupid’s Koi Garden.” Photo by Diana Snape

“Airship Orchestra.” Photo by Ben Weinstein

“Airship Orchestra.” Photo by Ben Weinstein

“Sky Castle.” Photo by Zu Rui

“Sky Castle.” Photo by Gavin Jowitt

“Sky Castle.” Photo by Gavin Jowitt

 

 



Art

A New Book Explores the Innovative Sculptures of Abstract Artist El Anatsui

March 30, 2022

Kate Mothes

All images courtesy of Damiani Publishing, shared with permission

Ghanaian-born Nigeria-based artist El Anatsui is known for sprawling metal sculptures that drape, twist, and fold across expansive surfaces in colorful, undulating patterns. A forthcoming book, El Anatsui: The Reinvention of Sculpture, traces his work and career that has pushed the boundaries of sculpture, starting with the terracotta pieces made in the late 1970s. In the following decade, he transitioned to using wood and began to experiment with scale, layers, color, and pattern. These pieces led to the development of his larger metal works, which are made by manually cutting, twisting, or flattening pieces of aluminum such as bottle caps and then stitching the material together with copper wire, creating enormous, textile-like sculptures.

Published by Damiani, the new 360-page volume is the product of more than three decades of research and collaboration with the artist by scholars Okwui Enwezor and Chika Okeke-Agulu, who place Anatsui’s work in the historical context of post-independence Ghana and mid-20th century African modernism in art and writing. Hundreds of color images examine the sculptures in detail, giving the reader an in-depth insight into the artist’s process, how transformation is central to his pieces, and how his approach evolved over time.

El Anatsui: The Reinvention of Sculpture is now available in the U.K. and can be purchased from Damiani. It will be released in late April in the U.S. and is available for pre-order from Bookshop.

 

 

 



Art

Responsive Sculptures by Daniel Rozin Echo Human Movement Through Undulating Objects

March 28, 2022

Grace Ebert

A solo exhibition at bitforms gallery highlights the fleeting nature of interaction in a series of responsive sculptures by artist Daniel Rozin (previously). Titled Shades, the show is comprised of multiple imitative works that reflect viewers’ movements through an embedded camera. “Take Out-Chopsticks Mirror,” for example, attaches the wooden utensils to a motorized base, and as someone passes in front of the piece, the components lift upward at a wider angle. In addition to the echoed motion, the undulating works rely on light and shadow to create intriguing, abstract renditions of human gesture.

Also included in the exhibition are two inverse sculptures, “CMY Shadows Mirror” and “RGB Peg Mirror.” Both works reproduce full-color reflections, although the former uses the subtractive color model and the latter additive. Whether animated by human presence or a pre-programmed algorithm, the resulting forms become dynamic displays of kaleidoscopic color.

If you’re in New York City, you can see Shades at bitforms gallery through April 23, and see more of Rozin’s works on his site and Instagram.

 

“RGB Peg Mirror” (2019), anodized aluminum knobs, motors, 3D camera, control electronics, computer, custom software, 72 inches in diameter and 4 inches in depth

“Take Out-Chopsticks Mirror” (2021), chopsticks, motors, wood, custom software, computer, camera, 66 x 34 x 17 inches

Detail of “Take Out-Chopsticks Mirror” (2021), chopsticks, motors, wood, custom software, computer, camera, 66 x 34 x 17 inches

 

 



Art

Vibrant Centimeter-Wide Paper Cranes by Artist Naoki Onogawa Engulf Bonsai Trees

March 24, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Naoki Onogawa, shared with permission

Tokyo-based artist Naoki Onogawa (previously) continues his meditative practice involving thousands of minuscule paper cranes. Attached in clusters to the branches of bonsai trees, the tiny birds perch in place of leaves and top the sculptural specimens with fantastically colored canopies. Onogawa painstakingly folds a square, centimeter-wide piece of paper into the origami cranes, which once amassed in large groups, symbolize eternal good fortune.

The artist is currently preparing for shows this fall at Picaresque Art Gallery in Shibuya, Tokyo, and TENMAYA in both Okayama and Fukuyama and recently opened his books for international commissions. Head to Instagram to dive into his process and stay up-to-date on new works.