sculpture

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Art Craft

Memories of Youth Interwoven With Thousands of Minuscule Glass Beads

October 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Bedside Table” (2011)

Artist David Chatt explores his past, family, and memories in all-white works created using found objects and minuscule white beads. Whereas earlier work was more purely decorative, like his colorful Breakfast Set (2004), over the last several years Chatt has simplified his color palette and plumbed the emotional depths of his life for more emotionally-engaged work.

In pieces created over the past several years, Chatt has drawn specifically from his personal and family history, selecting meaningful objects like a boombox from the early 1980s, the contents of his late parents’ nightstand, and the tools his mother used to create innumerable meals. Using glass beads and thread, the artist carefully covers each object, and he describes the act of covering as a means of both sealing off and protecting his memories. He shares with Colossal, “This process has the power to transform an object that, might as easily be relegated to land fill, into something precious and a record of a time, place or experience, something that encourages my audience to reflect on their own experiences and complete the story that I have begun.”

Chatt studied design at Western Washington University, Bellingham, in the late 1980s, where he recalls that a 6-foot-five male pursuing beadwork was not warmly embraced. Over the years, he has continued to refine his beadwork through post-secondary study. You can see work from Chatt in a group exhibition at Denmark’s Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in 2019, and in “A New State of Matter: Contemporary Glass” at Boise Art Museum in Idaho from November 3, 2018 to February 3, 2019, a group show which includes work from Steffan Dam (previously) and Amber Cowan (previously). (thnx, Diana!)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

“If She Knew You Were Coming…” (2015)

Detail, “If She Knew You Were Coming…” (2015)

Detail, “If She Knew You Were Coming…” (2015)

“1982” (2015)

 

 



Art

Geometric Shapes and Angular Faces Combine in New Salvaged Wood Murals, Assemblages, and Tattoos by Expanded Eye

October 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Expanded Eye (previously) is an arts collective formed by London-based artists Jade Tomlinson and Kevin James that utilizes a wide range of media to explore human consciousness and connectivity. The pair use salvaged wood to create colorful assemblages, sculptures, and public murals each designed in their unmistakable geometric style. Natural elements such as plants and birds are common motifs in their three-dimensional works. These images also cross over into their long-running tattoo practice which combines illustrated doodles, architecture-inspired renderings, and triangular patterns.

The duo is currently in Lisbon for a three month residency at WOZEN, which wraps up next month. During their stay they have been exploring the socio-economic and environmental pressures of the community, and creating work that seeks to address local issues of over-consumption, waste, and gentrification in Portugal’s capital. A cumulative exhibition titled No Future Without Memory will open at the space on November 9, and include the many large-scale three-dimensional works the pair have made during their time at the studio. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and Facebook.

Image by Sylvain Deleu

Image by Sylvain Deleu

 

 



Art

Crouched and Posed Figures Formed From Hundreds of Welded Bike Chains

October 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Anguish” (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

Young-Deok Seo (previously here and here) produces life-size figures welded from hundreds of folded bike chains. To create these works he first begins with a sketch, which he then digitizes to create a 3D model. Next he creates a full-scale rendition from clay, which serves as both his foundation and mold for the welded chains. Despite the many bends and curves of the chains’ hinges, the final forms perfectly outline the intricate details of human ears, torsos, and hands. The Korean artist as an upcoming solo exhibition curated by Liquid Art System at Abbazia della Misericordia in from late March to mid-April 2019. You can see more of his figurative sculptures on Instagram and Facebook.

"Anguish" (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm, all images provided by Young-Deok Seo

“Anguish” (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm, all images provided by Young-Deok Seo

"Anguish" (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm

“Anguish” (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm

"Anguish" (detail) (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

“Anguish” (detail) (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

"Meditation" (2018), 626 Stainless chain, 135 x 120 x 200 (h) cm

“Meditation” (2018), 626 Stainless chain, 135 x 120 x 200 (h) cm

"Nirvana" (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

“Nirvana” (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

"Nirvana" (detail) (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

“Nirvana” (detail) (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

"Meditation" (2018), 187 Iron chain, 84 x 50 x 110 (h) cm

“Meditation” (2018), 187 Iron chain, 84 x 50 x 110 (h) cm

 

 



Art

Mirrored Figures Reflect the Natural Landscape and Cultural Heritage of Morecambe Bay

October 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Rob Mulholland (previously) was recently commissioned by the Morecambe Bay Partnership to create a site-specific installation that would connect with the history of the northwest England site. The British sculptor and environmental artist created a series of six mirrored figures and two dwellings that represent the communities that once settled on the land. Visitors to the public project can view themselves reflected in the shapes of the area’s past, while also getting a new perspective on the surrounding hills and glistening sea. The project is a part of the Headlands to Headspace initiative, which is working to protect Morecambe Bay’s natural habitats such as salt marshes, sand dunes, coastal limestone grasslands, and woodland. You can see more of Mulholland’s mirrored figures on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Design

A Porous White Aluminum Sculpture Encourages Exploration and Play at the Jinji Lake Biennale

September 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by NAARO

For the 2018 Jinji Lake Biennale in Suzhou, China, Marc Fornes and his art and architecture studio THEVERYMANY (previously here and here) installed a porous outdoor pavilion crafted from white aluminum. Holes that span the bulbous structure allow light to pour in from each direction, sprinkling the interior with a variegated influx of miniature light beams. The piece is titled Boolean Operator after the search function that determines relationships between statements, concepts, or forms. Its experience is detailed in a statement on THEVERYMANY’s website:

The intricacy of the skin asserts a density: of limbs, of openings, of parts and their connections. You have to let your eyes adjust to the resolution of the experience. Unfocusing your gaze again, the whole scene overwhelms, strikes awe, compels you to move closer, deeper, and through an edgeless space. The doubly-curved surfaces cast no regular shadows, giving little information to the eye to perceive its scale or depth.

The winding nature of the installation encourages play, as the curvature of the outside walls turn inward to form the interior, and vice versa. You can see more projects by the New York City-based studio on their Instagram. (via NOTCOT)

 

 



Art

Sculptural Assemblages by Thomas Deininger Are Three-Dimensional Tricks of the Eye

September 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Thomas Deininger creates mind-bending optical illusions in his found object sculptural assemblages. The Rhode Island-based artist shares with Colossal that he began creating work from found objects in 1994, when he was “experimenting with the physical qualities of paint and abstraction in both material and imagery.” He continues,

Most of the content I was exploring involved mass consumerism, pop culture and environmental concerns. So really the medium easily became the message. I question beauty, value, and perception and how the three concepts do this little dance that changes how we all relate to the (physical and spiritual) world and how reality is just an illusion we all settle on for a time.

Deininger also explores assemblage in two-dimensional paper collages. Throughout his various mediums, he uses photographs and materials from popular culture, including Barbie dolls and trolls, and has re-created famous paintings by Diego Velázquez and Vincent van Gogh. You can see more of his work on Instagram.

 

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Art

Garment-Like Sculptures by Susie MacMurray Explore Perceptions of Female Identity

September 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Chain mail, needles, and dishwashing gloves: though not the materials you’d expect a dress to be made from, British artist Susie MacMurray uses them in her garment-inspired sculptures. MacMurray’s first piece in this body of work was Gladrags, made in 2002 from 10,000 pink balloons. Since then, the artist has produced several other seemingly wearable sculptures including Medusa (copper chain mail), Widow (leather and 100,000 dressmaker needles), and A Mixture of Frailties (1,400 household gloves).

“They have all been more concerned with the perception of women, their power and their vulnerabilities,” she explains to Colossal. “I am interested in how human strengths and frailties can often be one and the same thing. I suppose you could almost call them portraits… Much of my sculpture and drawing practice is concerned in one way or another with the perception and negotiation of female identity, both internal and external.”

MacMurray was formerly a classical musician, and she retrained as an artist, graduating in 2001 with an MA in Fine Art. In addition to her garment sculptures, MacMurray also creates drawings and architectural installations. You can see more of her work on her website and Twitter. (via #WomensArt)