sculpture

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Art

The Surreal Objects of Nancy Fouts

January 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Everyday objects take an unusual turn in Nancy Fouts‘ bizarre sculptures. Playing with unexpected combinations of violence and peace, the natural and manmade, interiors and exteriors, Fouts challenges viewers to rethink the categories we habitually place different objects in. The American-born, London-based artist studied at the Chelsea School of Art and the Royal College of Art. Prints of some works are available on Artsy and you can meet Fouts in the video below by Black Rat Projects.

 

 



Art

Strange Mess: Puddles of Skies and Galaxies by Jeffrey Michael Austin

January 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Chicago-based artist Jeffrey Michael Austin spends a lot of time photographing the puddles that collect on his city’s sidewalks and streets, observing the mirror-like quality that occurs when the sun hits the water at just the right angle. Eager to remake these special moments of reflection, Austin began creating his own sculptural puddles that appear to reflect the sky above. The works incorporate small bits of debris to strengthen the work’s illusion, while also adding to the quotidian nature of each false pool.

“The Puddles came from my desire to make work that at first glance feels mundane and unassuming, a candid situation you wouldn’t immediately regard as or associate with an art experience,” said Austin. “I’d hoped that in this way they would gently present themselves as yet another detail of your natural environment, before then unfurling with a kind of subtle and surprising magic — an extraordinary quality that you have to grapple with for a moment before facing it with any criticality.”

Austin likes to present his puddles in their “natural habitat” so they are not initially read as art. He hopes his small reflections of the sky (and more recently galaxies) spark a moment of curiosity in the audience they reach, making one rethink their expectations of the surrounding world.

You can view more of Austin’s in situ puddle sculptures, as well as browse a selection of the artist’s candid puddle photography on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

January 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Porous Boulder-Like Sculptures Chiseled from Italian Marble by Sibylle Pasche

January 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Swiss sculptor Sibylle Pasche transforms large segments of Italian marble into boulder-like sculptures which are covered in a porous web. These holes provide a peek inside the works’ complex interiors while also evoking the structure of a capillary system or the dense composition of a sea sponge. These openings visually conflict with the density and weight of her chosen material, which can often weigh up to several tons.

Pasche was born in Switzerland and studied art at the Liceo Artistico in Zurich. She currently keeps two European spaces for her work, splitting time between her studios in Switzerland and Carrara, Italy. You can see more of her large, sculptural forms on her Facebook and website.

 

 



Art

New Domestic Objects Wrapped in Needlepoint Scenes by Ulla Stina Wikander

January 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Underneath each of artist Ulla Stina Wikander's needlepoint objects is a real, once-functioning appliance, accessory, or tool. Wikander (previously) tends to select objects with traditional associations to domestic life, like sewing machines, ironing boards, and hair dryers. The artist, who is based in Switzerland, combines the retired objects with historical cross-stitch patterns, which she also collects. Each piece is finished with colorful rick-rack detailing to help define the edges and describe the original shape. Wikander recently updated her website with many new works, and you can also follow her on Instagram. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Art

The Dripping and Undulating Ceramic Sculptures of Toru Kurokawa

January 4, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Black Mountain, 2015. Ceramic. 39 2/5 × 31 1/2 × 39 2/5 in

Japanese artist Toru Kurokawa sculpts improbable liquid and biological shapes from a variety of ceramic materials. What begins life as a mere lump of clay, the artist molds and carves into artworks that appear like arrays of honeycomb, undulating coral, or dripping stalactites. Last year Kurokawa had a solo show with Sokyo Gallery titled The Savage Math, and you can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Sophie Gunnol)

 

 



Art

Life-Size Cardboard Sculptures of Chinese Villagers Tap Into Artist Warren King’s Ancestral Heritage

December 31, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Warren King began sculpting with cardboard as an attempt to add fantasy to the lives of his children, creatively crafting masks and helmets out of the recyclable material. This slowly evolved into a more time-consuming arts practice as King began focusing less time on costumes, and more time making large sculptures of his own. After a visit to his grandparents’ village in Shaoxing, China, the New York City-based artist felt compelled to more deeply connect with his cultural past. This sparked Grandfather’s Friend, and Arrival Times, a series of life-size cardboard recreations of his ancestors. 

“During my first visit to China about 7 years ago, I visited the village and spoke with residents who actually remembered my grandparents from over 50 years ago,” said King. “It was a pivotal experience for me, one that inspired me to become an artist. Through my work, I am attempting to understand the fragile connections to people and culture, and examine whether those connections, once broken, can be restored.”

King’s cardboard sculptures will be shown in the exhibition Art of Asia at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center from February 2 to March 28, 2018. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Flickr.