sculpture

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Art

Delicate Miniature Sculptures Made From Dandelion Seeds by Euglena

June 18, 2019

Johnny Waldman

Blowing the white fluffy seeds off a dandelion is a universal childhood experience. Who hasn’t delighted in watching a gentle breeze carry the bristles off into the distance. But for this Tokyo-based artist who goes by the name euglena, the fluff serves a different, artistic purpose. She harvests them to create impossibly delicate sculptures that beg to be observed up close. Just don’t sneeze.

Euglena uses dandelion seeds to create abstract shapes and forms that somehow manage to balance and maintain their figure. It’s difficult to fully appreciate the artist’s work in photographs because the element of air and movement is so important in the work.

In the video below, you can see the sculpture sway back and forth: a reaction to the movement and breathing of visitors observing her work.

Most recently, Euglena’s work was on display at the 2019 Japan Media Arts Festival (through June 16, 2019) where she won Best New Artist. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram to keep up with her work. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

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Art

Realistic Ceramic Sculptures of Decadent Desserts Examine Our Culturally Complex Relationship With Food

June 15, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Anna Barlow

This summer in Limoges, France, the Fondation Bernardaud presents a feast of cakes, pies, ice cream, and other life-like treats made by a group of 14 ceramic sculptors from around the world. Titled Céramiques Gourmandes and curated by Olivier Castaing, the exhibition explores the sometimes unsavory topics of mass consumption, desire, and cultural identity.

The sculptures in the exhibition are visually and conceptually packed with detail—from seemingly forkable slices of moist pecan pie by Shayna Leib (previously) to uncut and unreal fruit by Kaori Kurihara (previously). An impossibly tall overflowing sundae by Anna Barlow‘s impossibly tall sundae overflows with sweet ingredients,  and a 168 doughnut array by Jae Yong Kim (previously) pays homage to artists like Andy Warhol, Yayoi Kusama, and Jackson Pollock.

“No food is as powerful as dessert or gets as tied up in our issues of guilt, longing, abstinence, and turn,” said Leib in a press release for the exhibition. “We celebrate birthdays with it. Grandparents spoil children with it. It’s the first to get cut from a diet and the first some turn to for comfort.”

Céramiques Gourmandes opens on June 21 and runs through March 28, 2020. To learn more about the exhibition and the featured artists, visit the Fondation Bernardaud website.

Charlotte Coquen

Jessica Stoller

Jessica Stoller

Kaori Kurihara

Kaori Kurihara

Susan Nemeth

Susan Nemeth

Jae Yong Kim

Shayna Leib

Shayna Leib

 

 



Art Craft

Found Leaves with Delicate Crochet Embellishments by Susanna Bauer

June 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Everything That Surrounds Us”, all photographs by Art Photographers

In her series of sewn together and crocheted leaves and twigs, Susanna Bauer (previously) considers the fragility of nature and humans’ inextricable tie to its survival. The Cornwall, England-based artist combines the found elements with fine cotton thread to produce unique objects steeped in the history of craft. Intimate marks add detail to small patches or the complete outline of browned leaves, drawing our attention the natural growth patterns found in their interiors. A selection of her free-standing and framed sculptures are currently on view with Le Salon Vert at VOLTA Basel in Switzerland through June 15, 2019. You can view more of Bauer’s works formed from leaves, thread, and twigs on her website and Instagram.

“Moon XXXII”

“Path IV”

“Hope”

“Realignment”

“Repose”

“Restoration V”

“Suspended”

“Trans-Plant No. 21”

 

 



Art Design

Geometric Dresses and Headpieces Created Entirely From Strands of Spaghetti

June 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

French interior designer and visual artist Alice Pegna is attracted to unusual or surprising materials, often using objects outside of their intended purpose. For her project Ex Nihilo, Pegna designed an entire series of geometric dresses and headpieces formed from pieces of uncooked spaghetti. “Spaghetti is basically reserved for cooking, and in the collective imagery it appears fragile. These two reasons pushed me to want to use it,” she explains in her artist statement about the project. “On the other hand I like its features. It has a certain flexibility due to its finesse, while remaining rigid and easy to split.”

Pegna starts each design by forming polygons, which create architectural details while also increasing the strength of the combined pieces. Each sculptural garment is intended to add to the human body, changing the way we see it by obscuring it as little as possible. This is clear in the way that Pegna displays her creations with minimal mannequins and matte backgrounds. The designer and artist wants to highlight the objects on the body while creating a sense of emotion with added effects of light and smoke.

In the future Pegna wishes to scale up her project even further by eliminating the mannequins and manipulating the material in space without support to test its limits. You can see more of her creations by visiting her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Wearable Macramé Sculptures by Sandra de Groot Serve as Soft Headpieces and Armor

June 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Sandra de Groot of Atelier CHAOS creates soft sculptures that are displayed on the human body in the form of elaborate headpieces and ornate armor-like tops. The white macramé works are part of her collection titled kNOTs, which combine elements of craft, sculpture, and architecture in wearable works of art. Each of the ropes that composes her textile forms are made of high quality cotton that allows the pieces to maintain their inherent structure and shape. In a statement, de Groot shares, “the sculptures evolve according to an inner logic that is all mine. Only when the sculpture attains a textile form of attraction and becomes self-contained, I literally let go of the ropes.”

The artist studied at Minerva Art Academy and currently mentors intern artists and designers at her studio. You can see more of de Groot’s hand-knotted works, as well as her photography, on her website and Instagram. (via The Fiber Studio)

 

 



Art

Insects Sculpted Out of Repurposed Automotive Parts by Edouard Martinet

June 1, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Guepe Vase (Wasp), 38 x 20 x 75cm

French artist Edouard Martinet (previously) sources junk metal and automotive parts from garage sales and flea markets to create detailed sculptures of various creatures including models of ants, wasps, and other common insects. The found objects are held together with screws instead of welded joints, and the completed works measure between 30 centimeters and 2 meters long.

Martinet’s fascination with insects began when he was 8 years old. He went on to study design at l’École Supérieure des Arts Graphiques in Paris and to work as a graphic designer before starting to experiment with sculptures made of repurposed parts. Each work begins with an extensive sketching phase, followed by a look through Martinet’s large cache of collected “junk.” The sculptor rarely modifies pieces to fit a certain application, and will instead wait several months or years if necessary to find the perfect component. He turns bicycle badges into chrome fish scales, chains into antennae, and other miscellaneous scraps into anatomical facsimiles that seem manufactured specifically for his art.

An exhibition of Edouard Martinet’s work opens on June 1 at Bettina von Armin Gallery in Paris, and you can also follow the artist on Instagram for more looks at his studio process and completed sculptures.

Guepe (Wasp), 51 x 36 x 35cm

Guepe (Wasp), 51 x 36 x 35cm. Photos: Xavier Scheinkmann

Fourmis (Ant), 56 x 37 x 34cm

Poisson Lorette (Fish), 66 x 12 x 29cm

Poisson Lorette (Fish), 66 x 12 x 29cm

Sauterelle (Grasshopper), 70 x 29 x 45cm

Sauterelle (Grasshopper), 70 x 29 x 45cm

Scarabe Bleu (Blue Beetle), 52 x 44 x 12cm

Libellule (Dragonfly), 105 x 50 x 80 cm

Libellule (Dragonfly), 105 x 50 x 80 cm

 

 



Art

Objects and Figures Trapped Within Carved Wood Sculptures by Tung Ming-Chin

May 31, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Inner Turmoil” (2009), 85 x 85 x 30cm

Sculptor Tung Ming-Chin carves wood into figurative shapes that seem to press against the surface of the finished work. In “Inner Turmoil” a face and hands are trapped inside a hunk of wood that has the smooth, stretched appearance of fabric, and in “Breath”, the rounded spine and feet of a crouched figure expand outside the confines of a stiff white box. Tung was born in Changhua, Taiwan, and received both his BFA and MFA from Taipei National University of the Arts. You can view additional sculptures by the artist on the Taiwan Contemporary Art Archive website.

“Between Round and Square: Past, Present, and Future” (2013), 37 x 37 x 140cm

“The Birth of a New Hero” (2008), 35 x 30 x 45 cm

“The Birth of a New Hero,” detail (2008), 35 x 30 x 45 cm

“Leather Concept – Character” (2015), 43 x 28 x 164 cm

“A Stack of Heads” (2009), 35 x 35 x 160cm

“Breath” (2013), 60 x 40 x 30cm

“Changes Inside the Forest” (2011), 100 x 40 x 120cm