sculpture

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Art

Mexican Paintings, Lowriders, and Nachos Transformed into Piñata-Inspired Sculptures by Justin Favela

August 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Fridalandia" (2017), paper, glue and found objects, installation at the Denver Art Museum, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

“Fridalandia” (2017), paper, glue and found objects, installation at the Denver Art Museum, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

Justin Favela creates colorful artworks that center around his identity as a queer Latinx artist living in the Southwestern United States. The artist’s piñata-inspired pieces reference his Mexican and Guatemalan heritage and explore elements associated with his family, pop culture, food dishes, and the art world. Each life-size installation or colorful nature-based “painting” is constructed by layering multi-colored cut paper or using the papier-mâché technique seen on the popular party object.

“I have been making a lot of work using the piñata as a medium because I see it as the perfect symbol that stands for my identity and by using it, I am reclaiming the piñata and the culture it represents,” Favela tells Colossal.

One of his large-scale lowrider piñatas was recently included in the Peterson Automotive Museum‘s exhibition The High Art of Riding Low: Ranflas, Corazón e Inspiración. You can see more of the artist’s work on Instagram.

"Popocatepetl e Iztaccihuatl vistos desde Atlixco, after Jose Maria Velasco" (2016), paper and glue, 64 x 82 inches, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

“Popocatepetl e Iztaccihuatl vistos desde Atlixco, after Jose Maria Velasco” (2016), paper and glue, 64 x 82 inches, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

"Gypsy Rose Piñata" (2017), found objects, cardboard, styrofoam, paper and glue, 5 x 19.5 x 6.5 feet, photo courtesy of Petersen Automotive Museum

“Gypsy Rose Piñata” (2017), found objects, cardboard, styrofoam, paper and glue, 5 x 19.5 x 6.5 feet, photo courtesy of Petersen Automotive Museum

"Valle de México desde el Cerro de Santa Isabel, after Jose Maria Velasco" (2016), paper and glue on board, 64 x 86 inches, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

“Valle de México desde el Cerro de Santa Isabel, after Jose Maria Velasco” (2016), paper and glue on board, 64 x 86 inches, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

"Ahuehuete de la Noche Triste, after José María Velasco," 24 x 15.75 inches, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

“Ahuehuete de la Noche Triste, after José María Velasco,” 24 x 15.75 inches, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

"Floor Nachos" (2017), cardboard, paper, glue and found object, size varies, photo by Simon Mills, The MAC Belfast

“Floor Nachos” (2017), cardboard, paper, glue and found object, size varies, photo by Simon Mills, The MAC Belfast

"Doritos, Nacho Cheese" (2015), cardboard, paper and glue, 36 x 36, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

“Doritos, Nacho Cheese” (2015), cardboard, paper and glue, 36 x 36, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

"Piñata Motel" (2016), paper and glue on existing motel, photo by Krystal Ramirez

“Piñata Motel” (2016), paper and glue on existing motel, photo by Krystal Ramirez

"Lowrider Piñata" (2014), cardboard, paper and glue, 5 x 19.5 x 6.5 feet, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

“Lowrider Piñata” (2014), cardboard, paper and glue, 5 x 19.5 x 6.5 feet, photo by Mikayla Whitmore

 

 



Art

New Multi-Colored Sculptural Blobs Covered in Spongy Spikes by Dan Lam

August 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Amazonian,” all images provided by Dan Lam

Dan Lam (previously) creates brightly colored sculptural blobs that appear to drip from their installation on shelves. The polyurethane foam and epoxy resin works are covered in thousands of tiny spikes which are applied using a piping bag and acrylic paint. Lam creates time-lapse videos of this application, which offer satisfying peeks into her labor-intensive process. Lam has an upcoming solo exhibition at Stephanie Chefas Projects in Portland, Oregon which opens on October 5, and will be the artist-in-residence from October 8 to November 9, 2018 at Teton Art Lab in Jackson, Wyoming. You can see more of Lam’s soft, spike-covered sculptures on her Instagram.

"Convincing"

“Convincing”

"Damsel"

“Damsel”

"Healthy Glow"

“Healthy Glow”

"Spontaneous"

“Spontaneous”

"Under Your Skin"

“Under Your Skin”

 

 



Art

Rugged Multi-Color Paintings by Dylan Gebbia-Richards Mirror the Textures of Molten Rock

August 10, 2018

Anna Marks

Credit: Wes Magyar

Credit: Wes Magyar

Breathtakingly colorful textures pop out when viewers first witness Dylan Gebbia-Richards’s large-scale paintings which appear to escape from their canvas. His rugged works mirror the structure of natural forms such as molten rock or coral. “I see my works as their own landscapes,” Gebbia-Richards tells Colossal. “I allow chance, the driving force behind all natural phenomena, to sculpt the structures of my paintings.”

Gebbia-Richards gains his inspiration from the vastness of the natural world and his artworks explore aesthetics that merge between the microscopic and macroscopic. “I find the enormity of the natural world awe-inspiring,” he esplains. “Landscapes which are immense seem intimate simultaneously; counter-intuitively these large spaces create the feeling of an embrace.”

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Thomas Meyers

While Gebbia-Richards’ paintings vary in size, all are built to engulf the viewer. “Sometimes this is very literal like in my room-sized installations which encompass those inside,” he says. “But even with my smaller pieces, I’m looking for the work to expand outwards, attempting to generate the feeling of a place which is much larger.” Like observing a mountain range, the scale of his paintings inspire and delight, while his use of a bold color palette adds a hint of magic to each creation.

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

The artist’s works appear as if they have been created through a volcanic eruption. To imitate this process, he constructs his paintings by using colored pigment and droplets of melted wax. “I initially found dripping and splattering melting wax very satisfying,” says Gebbia-Richards. “I was interested in the qualities of the marks the melted wax produced, specifically the chaotic patterns of the splatters which sprung from the drip’s impact with the paper I was melting over.”

His paintings emerge by separating the dripping marks from their splatter. It is these random interactions between the various pigments, drip gestures, and the splatter which creates Gebbia-Richards’s layered textures that are signature to his practice. You can see one of the Colorado artist’s paintings at Looking For U at Unit London which runs until August 26, 2018. To view more of his work visit his website and Instagram.

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Steven Ironside

Credit: Danielle Webster

Credit: Thomas Meyers

 

 



Art

Conceptual Sculptures by Dario Escobar Reflect the Product Displays of Popular Sporting Goods

August 9, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Untitled (2016), Ed. 1/4 A/P Wood, urethane, grip tape, steel, gold plating, 15.7 x 9 x 3.7 inches. Photo credit: The Lapis Press, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

Unlike Guatemalan conceptual artist Darío Escobar, most people who pass through the sporting goods section of a store would not pause to consider the accumulation of mass-produced industrial objects like soccer balls and the cultural value that they gain via those who consume them. Escobar’s sculptural works make use of balls that have had their patches removed and resewn inside out, bats that have been broken and configured to form skylines, and skateboards that have been cut into pieces and reformed using gold hinges.

“My work starts from a reflection about the industrial object, sculptures created with soccer balls, skateboards, baseball bats, etc.,” the artist said in a statement, adding that his work is about the “persistent thinking of identical objects in a sculptural operation; a new configuration of an element repeated obsessively, such as when showing a product in supermarkets or sports stores.”

Escobar says that he is inspired by the way that objects like soccer balls are collected and displayed in an attempt to make them more appealing to consumers. “The artwork also tells us about the accumulation not from the perspective of the soccer balls’ ready-made individuality but from the amassing of merchandise as raw material for contemporary sculpture,” he said. In an interview with Reigning Champ, Escobar said that his manipulation of the objects is a way to “change the angle of view” and gain a new perspective. At larger retailers, balls are displayed at or below eye-level in individual packaging that elevate the intrigue of the product, while Escobar’s sculptures place them high above the viewer and bunch them together so that each ball is like the last. The works turn these merchandise displays on their head, creating unique ways to observe the construction of the sporting good object and its connection to the world at large.

To see more of Escobar’s conceptual sculptures using ready-made objects, check out his website.

Untitled (2016), Ed. 1/4 A/P Wood, urethane, grip tape, steel, gold plating, 15.7 x 9 x 3.7 inches. Photo Credit: The Lapis Press, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery.

Untitled [Skateboard] (2011), wood, urethane, paint, stainless steel, 75 x 45 x 0.75 in. Photo courtesy of the artist and Josée Bienvenu Gallery

“Bicho raro No. 1” (2011), urethane, steel, 9.4 x 13.7 x 7.5 inches. Photo credit: Felipe Censi, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Cool” (2000), wood, urethane, steel, plastic and stainless steel, 9 7/8 x 30 5/16 x 5 1/8 inches. Photo Credit: Gustavo Sapón, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Obverse & reverse XIV” detail (2013), latex, leather, string and steel, 138 x 78 x 78 inches. Photo credit: Mads Fredrik, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Obverse & reverse XIV”  installation view (2013), latex, leather, string, steel,138 x 78 x 78 inches. Photo credit: Mads Fredrik, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Untitled No. 1” (2015), wood, rubber, 13.6 x 53 x 12 inches. Photo credit: Gustavo Sapón, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Obverse & Reverse” (2016-2017), leather, latex, 18 karat gold leaf, polyurethane, steel. 4 clouds: 30 modules with 50 soccer balls in each module; 2 gold 18k gold leaf and black modules, 4 red and white-gray modules, 14 white-gray and black modules, 10 black and white-gray modules. A total of 1,500 soccer balls. Mercedez Benz Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia. Photo courtesy of the artist and Josée Bienvenu Gallery

“Obverse & Reverse (Black, white, red and gold)” (2016), leather, string, pigments, stainless steel, polyestyrene, gold leaf,177 x 354 x 157 inches. Photo credit: Justin Chan, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Obverse & Reverse (Black, white, red and gold)” (2016), leather, string, pigments, stainless steel, polyestyrene, gold leaf. 177 x 354 x 157 inches. Photo credit: Justin Chan, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Obverse & Reverse” (2010), latex, leather, string, 157 x 236 x 157 cm. Photo credit: Isaac Martínez, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Obverse & Reverse” detail. Photo credit: Isaac Martínez, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Paisaje Urbano (Detroit)” [Urban Landscape (Detroit)] (2018), serigraphed wood 115 x 152.5 x 39.5 inches. Photo credit: Gustavo Sapón, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

“Paisaje Urbano (Detroit)” [Urban Landscape (Detroit)] (2018), serigraphed wood 115 x 152.5 x 39.5 inches. Photo credit: Gustavo Sapón, courtesy of the artist and Nils Stærk Gallery

 

 



Art Craft

Lucy Sparrow’s ’80s Style Supermarket Offers 31,000 Handmade Felt Items

August 8, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

All images by Michael Anthony Hernandez

After setting up shop in a London corner store and NYC-style bodega, Lucy Sparrow (previously) has grown her unusual art showing/selling technique into a full-blown ’80s-style supermarket. Taking up 2,800 square feet of the Standard Hotel in Downtown LA, the British artist’s fifth large-scale installation is quite literally stuffed with replicas of everyday products, each handmade from felt. The shelves are packed with different ramen and instant noodle soups, Reese’s Puffs, Frosted Flakes and other popular cereals, three different brands of peanut butter along with Smucker’s grape or strawberry jelly, a whole range of favorite snacks, chips, pasta or rice, and all the essential personal hygiene products.

In 2014 Sparrow successfully used Kickstarter to fund her first major project in London called The Corner Shop, which offered 4,000 hand-sewn felt products. Three years later she hopped across the pond to open 8 ‘Til Late, a bodega located in Manhattan at The Standard, High Line with 9,000 items that sold out a couple of days before the official closing date. Challenged by the demand for her plush groceries, the artist locked herself inside her Felt Cave studio for a year and produced her largest and most elaborate project to date — Sparrow Mart.

The retro shop has all the familiar selections of American comforts, including a videotape rental section with ’80s classics like Footloose, Dirty Dancing, and Short Circuit. She also has fresh hand-sewn seafood on ice, sushi, fruits and vegetables, a variety of meat cuts and other animal products, popular snacks, canned goods, cereals, candies, sodas, liquor and cleaning products. Each item is meticulously cloned from felt, a material that evokes childhood and play. The fact that the store offers 27 different types of sushi (each produced in 300 pieces), plus chopsticks, wasabi, pickled ginger, and even soy sauce packed inside iconic plastic fish containers, says a great deal about the amount of detail and determination that went into creating this overwhelming installation. Working alone until very recently, the artist ended up hiring four full-time assistants in her studio and outsourcing fifteen professionals to complete this immersive project.

Offering a felt ATM in between the isles, an exclusive gallery section in the back, and ending with three felt checkout stations, each of the 31,000 products on view is available for purchase with prices ranging from $5 for bubblegum to $73 for a kimchi Michelada. Sparrow Mart is open through the end of August 2018 from 11am-9pm (closed Mondays). The installation is accompanied with Sparrow To Go, a 24/7 restaurant in the lobby of the hotel, offering dishes inspired by the items in Sparrow Mart and prepared by the hotel’s executive chef Julio Palma. After this, the artist is considering creating a similar installation in Chicago, Dallas, Melbourne, or somewhere in Asia, like Hong Kong or Tokyo. You can see more from Sparrow on Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

Coral-Inspired Vessels Formed From Thousands of Individually-Applied Porcelain Fragments by Olivia Walker

August 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

London and Barcelona-based ceramicist Olivia Walker produces works in porcelain that address the ideas of growth and decay through additive and subtractive processes. After creating her initial shape on a potter’s wheel, Walker attaches thousands of individually-applied fragments that appear like organic growths. “I start from a set point on a bowl, and let these organic accretions spread out and grow – eating through, or growing over the form beneath,” she explains. “These make reference to organisms – fungus, coral, and bacteria – but are unidentifiable.”

Walker’s vessels are currently a part of the New Member Showcase at CAA Gallery in London through August 31, 2018. She will also be showing her sculptures at the British Craft Pavilion as a part of the London Design Festival from September 20-23, 2018. You can see more of her porcelain works on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Life-Size Animals Emerge from Persian Rugs in Perception-Defying Sculptures by Debbie Lawson

August 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Red Bear”

British sculptor Debbie Lawson works in the space between two and three dimensions, forming wild animals that emerge from old-fashioned rugs. The artist builds her animals from scratch, using chicken wire and masking tape, and then covers them with identical or near-identical Persian carpets to create the illusion that the creature is fused with the hanging rug.

Lawson explains to Colossal, “I have always ‘accidentally’ spotted images in patterns, on textured walls and floors made of wood or lino – any material really. It’s an obsession that I decided to explore in the studio, using first wood grain and then carpet to make work in which the pattern morphed into an actual image or form…More recently I have focussed on animal forms to explore the idea of camouflage, and of its opposite: display.”

Red Bear is on display until August 19 2018 at the Royal Academy of Arts in London as part of the 250th Summer Exhibition curated by Grayson Perry. Persian bear is permanently displayed (along with a moose in the same style) at London’s Town Hall Hotel. You can see more of Lawson’s finished works and take peeks into her studio process on Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Red Bear Head”

“White Stag”

“Red Bear Head” and “White Stag” (detail)

“Persian Bear”