sculpture

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Art

Crystal Hearts and Translucent Tongues Shaped Into Sculptural Works by Debra Baxter

August 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Cross My Heart” (2019), Glass, Crystal Geode, 4.5″ x 5″ x 3″

Santa Fe-based sculptor and jewelry designer Debra Baxter combines glass, bronze, crystal, wood, and found objects to create ghostly sculptures of human forms. In one piece titled “Cross My Heart” (2019), a purple heart sits on top of a rough cluster of geodes, while in ‘First Taste” (2017), a glass tongue protrudes from a slab of quartz crystal.

For many of her recent works Baxter, shares with Roq Larue Gallery that she drew inspiration from the phenomenon of the “Ghost Heart.” In this medical procedure, a heart is cleansed of all of its blood cells and then injected with hundreds of millions of new blood steam cells which cause the heart to begin beating again. Baxter is interested in how this concept explores the complexity of existence, walking the line between life and death.  You can see more of her sculpted hearts and wearable artworks on her website and Instagram.

“Crystal Brass Knuckles (Aura Blow)” (2017), Aqua Aura Crystal and White Rhodium Plated Bronze, 7″ x 5″ x 2″

“Ghost Hand” (2019), Glass, Smoky Quarts, 13″ x 11″ x 12″

“First Taste” (2017), Glass and Quartz Crystal, 6″ x 8″ x 4″

“Silver Heart” (2019), Silver, Quartz, 3″ x 3.5″ x 5.75″

“I’m Your Venus” (2017), Cast Glass, Bronze, 5″ x 5.5″ x 2.5″

“Wind Knocked In” (2017), Amethyst, Bronze, Mopany Wood, 9.5″ x 15″ x 6.5″

“Heart of Gold” (2019), Bronze, Thunder Bay amethyst, 3″ x 3.5″ x 5.75″

 

 



Animation Art Design Science

Infinite Forms Unfurl in New Rotating Sculptures by John Edmark

August 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

We continue to be transfixed by John Edmark’s (previously) infinite 3-D printed designs. The self-described artist, designer, and inventor uses visual tricks to create cascading effects on rotating textured white sculptural surfaces. His most recent video, “Blooms Assortment”, features a noodle-like form, shifting cubes, and a hollow gridded shape that resembles a geyser or mushroom cloud. Edmark has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in computer science and has lectured at Stanford’s design program for over fifteen years.  See more of Edmark’s creations on Vimeo and if you’d like to call one of his pieces your own, visit his online store.

 

 



Art

Banal Moments Contorted into Surreal Stoneware Sculptures by Genesis Belanger

August 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Genesis Belanger twists and stretches familiar objects into surreal scenarios with her stoneware, porcelain, and concrete sculptures. The Brooklyn-based artist frequently depicts detached limbs, misplaced teeth, and unusually located food in her work. One sculpture shows a mustard-topped hot dog disappearing into a handbag with a mouth-like zipper; another series dispenses rocks from dysfunctional quarter candy machines. This spring, a stoneware desk topped with flaccid pens, a tape-like tongue dispenser, and a drawer full of coping mechanisms was on view in the New Museum’s store window gallery. Belanger earned an MFA at Hunter College and a BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Explore more of her unusual sculptures on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Peaceful Portraits Shaped from Bunched and Layered Netting by Benjamin Shine

August 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

For his “flow” series, artist and designer Benjamin Shine crafts portraits of serene faces using lightweight tulle fabric. The fine netted material allows for dramatic differences in opacity depending on how densely it is is bunched or layered. In his artist statement, Shine explains that his work “centers on ideas of energy, impermanence and the relationship between the spiritual and the superficial.” With his most recent sculpture, “Quietude”, Shine scaled up his signature portraits and built an outdoor sculpture that measures over eight feet tall. The fuchsia-toned sculpture was made an 80 by 20 foot piece of recycled high density polyethylene shaped around a steel frame, and its color shifts as natural light changes throughout the day. Take a peek inside Shine’s studio in the video interview below, and see more of his work on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Thousands of Miniature Mirrors Dazzle and Refract in Multi-Media Sculptures by Lee Bul

August 1, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Installation view, Lehmann Maupin, Chrystie Street, New York, May 2-June 21, 2014, all images via Lehmann Maupin

Korean artist Lee Bul examines shared human consciousness in a variety of forms, creating tentacled sculptures, futuristic chandeliers, and other large-scale forms that refract the audience through tiny mirrored tiles. The installations and sculptures are at once inspired by the past as they draw from societal folklore and shared histories, and the future, as they consider technological advancements.

“For Lee Bul, humankind’s fascination with technology ultimately refers to our preoccupations with the human body and our desire to transcend flesh in pursuit of immortality,” explains the artist’s biography. “This interest often materializes in her work in the form of a cyborg—a being that is both organic and machine—the closest thing to a human that truly achieves this ideal.”

Bul views the cyborg as a metaphor for our current attraction and repulsion to advanced technology, her works a dual representation of its attractive and monster-like qualities. This year Lee Bul received the Ho-Am Prize for The Arts, which is awarded to people of Korean heritage who have made significant accomplishments to science, engineering, medicine, community service, the arts, or other specialized fields. Bul’s solo exhibition of recent painting and sculpture titled City of the Sun closed at SCAD Museum of Art on July 28, 2019. You can see more of her sculptures and installations on her gallery Lehmann Maupin’s website.

Installation view of “From Me, Belongs to You Only,” Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, February 4-May 27, 2012

“Sternbau No. 32” (2011), Crystal, glass and acrylic beads on nickel-chrome wire, stainless steel and aluminum armature, 66.93 x 36.22 x 34.25 inches

“Untitled sculpture (M5)” (2014), Mirrored tiles, acrylic paint on polyurethane sheets, stainless steel armature, 62.2 x 110.24 x 15.75 inches

“Sternbau No. 4” (2007), Crystal, glass and acrylic beads on nickel-chrome wire, stainless steel and aluminum armature, 51.18 x 27.56 x 27.56 inches, Installation view, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, 2007, Photo: Patrick Gries

“Untitled” (2010), Polyurethane panels, mirrored tiles, acrylic paint, 86.61 x 24.8 x 23.62 inches

“Souterrain” (2012), Plywood on wooden frame, acrylic, mirror, alkyd paint, 107.87 x 141.73 x 188.98 inches

“Monster Black” (1998-2011), Fabric, cotton filling, stainless-steel frame, sequins, acrylic paint, dried flower, glass beads, aluminum, crystal, metal chain, 85.43 x 73.62 x 67.32 inches

 

 



Art

Romania’s Historic Cultural and Civic Leaders are Brought to Life in Sculptural Metal ‘Drawings’ by Darius Hulea

July 31, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Romanian sculptor Darius Hulea manipulates iron, stainless steel, brass, and copper wires to form three-dimensional portraits of historical figures. Ranging from royalty to poets, Hulea’s work often focuses on Romanian luminaries. The artist has rendered Queen Marie, sculptor Grigore Bradea, and philosopher Mircea Eliade along with many others, carefully recreating each subject’s furrowed brows and flowing hair in metal.

In an interview with My Modern Met Hulea explains, “I hope that people will understand that I do nothing but draw in a new way, in a durable material of the past. I can then explore and research, as an artist, mythical, Renaissance, and modern thinking by finding three-dimensional examples that describe us now in a history of the past.”

Hulea received a PhD in visual arts from Cluj-Napoca Art & Design University. He cites his family as inspiration for his creative life: his grandmother and great-grandmother were weavers, while his grandfather worked with agricultural tools. Hulea is represented by Renaissance Art Gallery in Bucharest, Romania. Peek inside the artist’s studio through his Facebook and Instagram accounts. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

Ghostly Figures Occupy Sculptures of Architectural Ruin by Diana Al-Hadid

July 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Nolli’s Orders” (2012), Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint, 156 x 264 x 228 inches, all images via Marianne Boesky Gallery

Diana Al-Hadid creates large-scale sculptures and installations that merge bodily forms with collapsing altars, columns, and other architectural forms. Headless bronze figures in repose appear to drip down concrete blocks, while organs surround fictional players like beautiful beasts. In each, the Syran-American artist references archaeological remains, creating ghostly figures that reference the ruins from societies past. In addition to traditional sculptural media like bronze, steel, and concrete, the artist also incorporates more experimental materials like beeswax, fiberglass, and foam. “For me to get a sculpture to lift off the floor…that’s the first way to rebel,” Al-Hadid explained about her gravity-defying work in an Art21 interview.

The Brooklyn-based artist has concurrent Nashville-based exhibitions at both the Frist Art Museum until September 2, 2019 and Cheekwood Estate&Gardens. You can see more of Al-Hadid’s sculptural work on her website and Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Synonym” (2016), Polymer modified gypsum, fiberglass, powder coated aluminum, pigment, 83 x 60 x 60 inches, Edition of 5, with 1 AP

“Suspended After Image” (2012), Wood, steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, high density foam, plaster, paint, 126 x 282 x 204 inches

Detail of “Synonym” (2016), Polymer modified gypsum, fiberglass, powder coated aluminum, pigment, 83 x 60 x 60 inches, Edition of 5, with 1 AP

Detail of “Antonym” (2012), Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint, 68 x 63 x 54 inches

Detail of “In Mortal Repose” (2011), Bronze and concrete, 72 x 71 x 63 1/4 inches

Installation view of “Falcon’s Fortress” at Boesky Gallery, (2017), Photography Credit: Object Studies

Detail of “A Measure of Ariadne’s Love” (2007), Mixed media 84 x 108 x 96 inches

“A Measure of Ariadne’s Love” (2007), Mixed media, 84 x 108 x 96 inches

Installation view of “Phantom Limb,” NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery, 2016