sculpture

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Art

Fantastical Mechanisms of Land and Sea Built from Cardboard and Hand-Blown Glass by Daniel Agdag

July 2, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“The Latitudinal” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12″, all images provided by the artist

Australian sculptor and filmmaker Daniel Agdag (previously) builds fictionalized architectural objects that could find their home in the sky, on land, or under the sea. The cardboard, timber, and hand-blown glass structures are inspired by the hidden mechanics found in everyday industrial forms, and consist of miniature models of fans, gears, and pumps. Inflated balloons like The Southeasterly carry small ship-like vessels, and a 2018 work titled The Second State looks like an early roller coaster model complete with billboard-like signage that spells out the word “LUCKY.”

Agdag received a Master’s degree in Film and Television from the Victorian College of the Arts in 2007. His recent solo exhibition States wrapped at Messums in Wilshire on June 30, 2019, and selected sculptures from the exhibition will travel to the gallery’s London location from July 3 to 13, 2019. You can and see more of Agdag’s sculptural objects on his website and Instagram.

“The 2nd Tulip” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12” (L), “The Buoy” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12” (R)

“The Second State” (2018), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

Detail of “The Second State” (2018), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

“The 2nd Round Car” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12” 

Detail of “The Latitudinal” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

“The Southeasterly” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

The Southerly

Detail of the Southerly

“The Longitudinal” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

 

 



Art

A Massive Wooden Wave Surges From a Gallery Floor in an Installation by Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen

July 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In a gallery at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) this spring, an all-encompassing wave of wood surrounded visitors as they walk across gangplanks that bisect the space. The installation, Hubris Atë Nemesis, was by Maine-based artist duo Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen. Kavanaugh and Nguyen have been collaborating since 2005 and working exclusively with paper. “One of the foundations of our collaborative art practice is the act of shared seeing, the artists shared. “We find common ground by actively investigating our own visual reference points, memories and assumptions.”

For this installation, the artists pushed their practice to include new media and techniques: Hubris Atë Nemesis is their first piece in wood, and the first in which the pathway through the piece is an actual part of the installation. The artists explained in a statement that the title and concept of the work is derived from a three-part narrative arc common in Greek tragic plays:

Hubris, characterized as an arrogant confidence, transforms to Atë, a ruinous folly or madness, then ultimately to Nemesis, a force of retribution that resets the natural order. Like many paintings of the Maine coast, we hope this work captures a moment of suspense in a dynamic system—a snapshot with an uncertain future—and that it appears to be unwritten what the restored natural order should or might become.

Hubris Atë Nemesis was created with the support of the Ellis-Beauregard Foundation: Kavanaugh and Nguyen were selected from a blind jury of over two hundred applicants. The installation was on view through June 16, 2019 at the CMCA. If you did not get a chance to experience the work in person, an impressive 360° virtual tour by Dave Clough is available. You can explore more of Kavanaugh and Nguyen’s archive of monochromatic installations, like White Stag and The Experience of Green, on the duo’s website.

 

 

 



Art

Jen Stark Unveils Colorfully Vivid Portals Based on Scientific and Mathematical Concepts at Joshua Liner Gallery

June 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images courtesy of the artist and Joshua Liner Gallery

Los Angeles-based artist Jen Stark (previously) uses materials such as paper, wood, and metal to create optically-charged sculptures based on complex scientific and mathematic concepts. Layered colors with both smooth and warped edges create tunnels into the unknown, forming visual interpretations of ideas such as infinity, evolution, or sacred geometry. One wall piece by Stark lines up dozens of layers of brightly colored paper which are sliced to fold on top of each other in a descending order of size. Others hang from the ceiling, inviting observers to peer at the works from multiple angles, to understand its composition from beside, underneath, and between its layers.

Stark’s solo exhibition Dimensionality runs through July 19, 2019 at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York City. You can see more of her dizzying vortexes on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

New Kinetic Floral Sculptures by Casey Curran Blossom Through a Series of Wires and Cranks

June 20, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Seattle-based artist Casey Curran (previously) builds sculpture environments from wire, laser cut acrylic, aluminum, sculpted brass. His works appear in a constant state of growth and bloom, opening and closing with the assistance of motors or hand-cranked systems. These interactive systems invite the audience to not only watch his sculptures, but participate in their movement.

The works are inspired by complex systems in nature, yet aren’t obvious imitations of any particular  source plant or natural object. “When conceiving my pieces I center on a hidden narrative and begin to assign visual elements that aline with the concept of the piece, often utilizing ornate structures and simple construction methods to further highlight my interests in foundation and form,” Curran explains on his website. “In the process of creating I look for patterns in nature and symmetry in ecosystems. I look for how innovation shapes itself into our ever expanding systems of complexity and knowledge.”

You can see more of Curran’s kinetic sculptures in motion on Instagram and Vimeo.

 

 



Art

Delicate Miniature Sculptures Made From Dandelion Seeds by (euglena)

June 18, 2019

Johnny Waldman

Blowing the white fluffy seeds off a dandelion is a universal childhood experience. Who hasn’t delighted in watching a gentle breeze carry the bristles off into the distance. But for this Tokyo-based artist who goes by the name (euglena), the fluff serves a different, artistic purpose. She harvests them to create impossibly delicate sculptures that beg to be observed up close. Just don’t sneeze.

(euglena) uses dandelion seeds to create abstract shapes and forms that somehow manage to balance and maintain their figure. It’s difficult to fully appreciate the artist’s work in photographs because the element of air and movement is so important in the work.

In the video below, you can see the sculpture sway back and forth: a reaction to the movement and breathing of visitors observing her work.

Most recently, (euglena)’s work was on display at the 2019 Japan Media Arts Festival (through June 16, 2019) where she won Best New Artist. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram to keep up with her work. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by (euglena) (@__euglena) on

 

 



Art

Realistic Ceramic Sculptures of Decadent Desserts Examine Our Culturally Complex Relationship With Food

June 15, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Anna Barlow

This summer in Limoges, France, the Fondation Bernardaud presents a feast of cakes, pies, ice cream, and other life-like treats made by a group of 14 ceramic sculptors from around the world. Titled Céramiques Gourmandes and curated by Olivier Castaing, the exhibition explores the sometimes unsavory topics of mass consumption, desire, and cultural identity.

The sculptures in the exhibition are visually and conceptually packed with detail—from seemingly forkable slices of moist pecan pie by Shayna Leib (previously) to uncut and unreal fruit by Kaori Kurihara (previously). An impossibly tall overflowing sundae by Anna Barlow‘s impossibly tall sundae overflows with sweet ingredients,  and a 168 doughnut array by Jae Yong Kim (previously) pays homage to artists like Andy Warhol, Yayoi Kusama, and Jackson Pollock.

“No food is as powerful as dessert or gets as tied up in our issues of guilt, longing, abstinence, and turn,” said Leib in a press release for the exhibition. “We celebrate birthdays with it. Grandparents spoil children with it. It’s the first to get cut from a diet and the first some turn to for comfort.”

Céramiques Gourmandes opens on June 21 and runs through March 28, 2020. To learn more about the exhibition and the featured artists, visit the Fondation Bernardaud website.

Charlotte Coquen

Jessica Stoller

Jessica Stoller

Kaori Kurihara

Kaori Kurihara

Susan Nemeth

Susan Nemeth

Jae Yong Kim

Shayna Leib

Shayna Leib

 

 



Art Craft

Found Leaves with Delicate Crochet Embellishments by Susanna Bauer

June 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Everything That Surrounds Us”, all photographs by Art Photographers

In her series of sewn together and crocheted leaves and twigs, Susanna Bauer (previously) considers the fragility of nature and humans’ inextricable tie to its survival. The Cornwall, England-based artist combines the found elements with fine cotton thread to produce unique objects steeped in the history of craft. Intimate marks add detail to small patches or the complete outline of browned leaves, drawing our attention the natural growth patterns found in their interiors. A selection of her free-standing and framed sculptures are currently on view with Le Salon Vert at VOLTA Basel in Switzerland through June 15, 2019. You can view more of Bauer’s works formed from leaves, thread, and twigs on her website and Instagram.

“Moon XXXII”

“Path IV”

“Hope”

“Realignment”

“Repose”

“Restoration V”

“Suspended”

“Trans-Plant No. 21”

 

 

A Colossal

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