sculpture

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Art Craft

Globs of Color and Texture Ooze Off Brian Rochefort’s Ceramic Sculptures

February 24, 2019

Andrew LaSane

All images: Brian Rochefort

Los-Angeles based mixed media sculptor Brian Rochefort uses ceramic and glazes to create one-of-a-kind vessels covered in abstract patterns and textured blobs. Unfired clay objects are broken apart, built upon with more material, then fired between each layer of glaze to produce volcanic masses or craters, overflowing with color and character.

The surfaces of the sculptures are a blend of rough, uneven clumps and smooth, bubbly drips, all suspended in place by the kiln firing. Solid vibrant chunks flow over previously laid gradients while cracked exteriors peek from beneath translucent splatters. The final forms are a colorful reflection of the process, which makes each close-up image that Rochefort shares on Instagram feel like a different piece.

Following a recent solo exhibition at Van Doren Waxter Gallery in New York, Rochefort is gearing up for a two-person show with artist Jackie Saccoccio at Adrian Rosenfeld Gallery in San Francisco this May.

Installation view at Van Doren Waxter Gallery

 

 



Art

Intricate Metal Root Sculptures by Sun-Hyuk Kim Take Human Form

February 17, 2019

Andrew LaSane

South Korean artist Sun-Hyuk Kim (previously) cuts, welds, melts, and curves pipes and wires into structures that are part human anatomy and part twisted plant root systems. The branch-like metal blood vessels create the outline of limbs, abdomens, and heads, as well as the trees that appear to have sprouted from them. Made entirely of stainless steel, the sculptures are meant to signify our imperfect and incomplete existence in relation to the natural world.

“My art is a tool to discover the truth and remind myself [and] viewers through various media,” Sun-Hyuk told Colossal. From large head-shaped root sculptures connected at the nose, to full body works with large trunks protruding from the head, back, and torso, the sculptures are often dramatic depictions of the human experience and what the artist considers truth.

New sculptures and drawings will be shown at Sun-Hyuk’s upcoming solo show at the Suhadam Art Space in South Korea from June 7 through August 5, 2019. To see more of his current and future works, you can also follow the artist on Instagram. (via Ignant)

 

 



Art

Pensive Faces Peer Out From the Pages of Bronze Book Sculptures by Paola Grizi

February 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Italian sculptor Paola Grizi creates bronze sculptures of faces emerging from the tousled pages of books, often with an exposed hand that appears to gently push aside the pages. Some of the pieces are sculpted as traditional novels, while others are more abstract— bronze pieces of paper folded and stacked in cube-like formations. The enduring metal works are meant honor the physicality of printed materials, resources which are quickly being lost due to the ease and immediacy of technological devices. You can see more of Grizi’s literary sculptures on Instagram.  (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

Dream Worlds Imagined in Contorted Clay Portraits by Johnson Tsang

February 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Remembrance”

Johnson Tsang (previously) continues to create spectacularly emotive ceramic sculptures of the human face. The Hong Kong-based artist’s latest series, Lucid Dream II, features surreal contortions that squish, wring, melt, and stretch. Titles like “Remembrance,” “Extrication,” and “Unveiled” suggest an exploration of the liminal space between the conscious and subconscious, in addition to the self and other. Tsang uses plain, unglazed clay, eschewing typical lifelike details such as color, hair, and apparel, to focus the viewer’s attention on the universally-relatable expressions of each of his imagined subjects. You can see more of the sculptor’s completed and in-progress work on Instagram and Facebook.

“Here and There”

“Here and There” detail

“Work in Progress”

“Under the Skin”

“Love in Progress”

“Falling in Love”

“Unveiled”

“Lawful Custody”

“Extrication”

 

 



Art

Recycled Shirts and Ski Equipment Take on Sculptural Dimensions in Layered Works by Kaarina Kaikkonen

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kaarina Kaikkonen, "I Sprouted Into New Dimensions" (2017), Mixed media, 96.46 x 163.39 x 8.66 inches, via Galerie Forsblom

Kaarina Kaikkonen, “I Sprouted Into New Dimensions” (2017), Mixed media, 96.46 x 163.39 x 8.66 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

Finnish artist Kaarina Kaikkonen (previously) transforms old consumer products into sculptural works that are presented both in galleries and as sprawling site-specific installations. In her large-scale apparel-based works, lines of shirts hang in orderly lines above city streets, while in smaller pieces like “I Feel Safe” (2015), she creates an angel-like formation with spread shirt sleeves as wings. In 2015, the artist built a site-specific installation in Tempere, Finland using Finnish cross country skis to create a colorful support for an angular building.

You can take an further look into her studio in this video produced in connection with her 2018 exhibition “You Remain in Me” at the KUNSTEN Museum of Modern Art in Aalborg, Denmark, and see more images of her sculptures on her website and via Galerie Forsblom.

"Only a Breath of Wind" (2010), Men's shirts, 15.75 x 133.86 x 47.24 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

“Only a Breath of Wind” (2010), Men’s shirts, 15.75 x 133.86 x 47.24 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

"I Feel Safe" (2015), Men's shirts and child's clothes, image via Sara Zanin Gallery

“I Feel Safe” (2015), Men’s shirts and child’s clothes, image via Sara Zanin Gallery

L: "Whereabouts" (2014), Man's jacket, 93.5 x 61.5 x 6 inches, R: "Night Hawkmoth" (2014), Man's jacket, hook, 24.5 x 28 x 7 inches, images via Galerie Forsblom

L: “Whereabouts” (2014), Man’s jacket, 93.5 x 61.5 x 6 inches, R: “Night Hawkmoth” (2014), Man’s jacket, hook, 24.5 x 28 x 7 inches, images via Galerie Forsblom

Image from 2014 exhibition with Galerie Forsblom

Image from 2014 exhibition with Galerie Forsblom

"The Upsurging Spirit" (2015), Old Finish cross country skis, site-specific, Tempere, Finland, image via Sara Zenin Gallery

“The Upsurging Spirit” (2015), Old Finish cross country skis, site-specific, Tempere, Finland, image via Sara Zenin Gallery

 

 



Art

New Embroideries of People Slumbering on Handmade Pillows by Maryam Ashkanian

January 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Iranian artist Maryam Ashkanian (previously) embroiders portraits of peaceful sleepers deeply resting as a part of her ongoing Sleep series. Each individual she creates begins with a gestural line drawing that is then embroidered onto a handmade pillow. Little hints of the sleeper’s personality are presented by the way the pillow is designed—from a flowered watch on one’s wrist, to a ruffle that encircles that pillow’s outer edge. You can see more of Ashkanian’s textile work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

A Pulsating Neon Skeleton by Tavares Strachan Honors Scientist Rosalind Franklin

January 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Courtesy of Tavares Strachan, all photography and video by Tom Powel Imaging.

What Will Be Remembered in the Face of All That is Forgotten is a sculptural neon work by the New York City-based artist Tavares Strachan made between 2014-2015. The five-foot-tall piece includes pulsating neon that mimics the racing of blood through veins, stainless steel to hold the skeleton in place, and a total of seven transformers. The flashing circulatory system is a glowing reminder of English scientist Rosalind Franklin’s contributions to the field of science, mainly the discovery of DNA’s molecular structures. The work was originally included in the solo exhibition Seeing is Forgetting the Thing that You Saw at Anthony Meier Fine Arts in San Francisco, which examined individuals whose names have been omitted from common accounts of history despite their great accomplishments.

Strachan, in partnership with LACMA Art + Technology Lab and SpaceX, also recently launched a sculpture honoring Robert Henry Lawrence Jr., the first African-American to train as an astronaut with NASA. Although Lawrence never made it into space, a 24-karat gold urn with his bust titled “Enoch” will orbit the Earth for seven years in a sun-synchronous orbit. You can see more of Strachan’s sculptural work, and keep up-to-date on the location of Enoch, on Instagram.