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Art

Opulent Kintsugi Installation by Artist Victor Solomon Gilds Dilapidated Basketball Court in Los Angeles

August 4, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images by Shafik Kadi and © Victor Solomon, shared with permission

Celebrating the restorative qualities of sports and basketball’s return this past week, Victor Solomon has repaired a deteriorated court in South Los Angeles through the ancient art of Kintsugi—the Japanese method of repairing broken pottery by using metallic substances to mend the fractures. The artist filled cracks in the cement with gold-dust resin, highlighting the years of use “to accentuate the healing as a formative part of its journey,” he says. “Sport can entertain, inspire, and distract, but more apropos than all, the platform of sport can help us heal.” Titled “Kintsugi Court,” the gilded installation has similarly lavish backboards and hoops.

The restored court is just one of Solomon’s explorations into the sport and the ways it intersects with luxury. For more of his embellished projects, head to Instagram. (via The Kids Should See This)

 

 

 



Art Photography

Masks, Toilet Paper, and Thermometers Transform into Miniature, Outdoor Adventures by Artist Tatsuya Tanaka

August 3, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Tatsuya Tanaka, shared with permission

In the time of COVID-19, disposable face masks, toilet paper, and other essentials are synonymous with safety, precaution, and staying indoors. But in Tatsuya Tanaka’s ongoing Miniature Calendar series, the everyday items are subverted to create the tiny sets of outdoor adventures. A folded mask serves as a small tent, toilet paper descends from a wall holder as a snowy ski hill, and a thermometer outfitted with wheels transforms into a speedy racecar. For more of the miniature scenes from the Japanese artist and photographer (previously), head to Instagram, where he publishes a new piece daily. (via Lustik)

 

 

 



Photography

Dive Into a Never-Ending Sequence of Jumps and Tucks in an Olympic-Games Compilation

June 11, 2020

Grace Ebert

Although devotees of the Olympic games will have to wait until 2021 for the next round of competitions, Donato Sansone channels the same excitement, energy, and displays of strength into an extravagant new mashup. A second iteration of his previous video by the same name, Sansone’s latest motion sequence is comprised of short clips of athletes completing tucks, dives, and pikes. Each bit of footage seamlessly blends into the next, making the competitors appear to be joined in a single, nearly minute-long jump.

For more of Sansone’s Rube Goldberg-esque sequences, head to Tumblr and Vimeo.

 

 

 



Photography

A Collage of Overlapping Videos Creates a Wild Rube Goldberg-esque Motion Sequence

March 30, 2020

Grace Ebert

Beginning with a man blowing his lips, an impressive compilation by Donato Sansone merges short clips of car crashes, fiery explosions, and punches thrown during a boxing match into a believable series of consequences. Ranging from nature to sports to destructive events, each seconds-long bit appears to lead right into the next in “Concatenation“—seemingly, a rocket launches straight into a pool ball that then causes a diver to jump into the water. A bullet impales a board, prompting two fiery masses in another section.

Head to Vimeo and Tumblr to check out more of Sansone’s sequence-based projects.

 

 



Photography

Bolivia's Powerful Cholitas Luchadora Wrestlers Photographed by Todd Antony

August 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Todd Antony, shared with permission

Photographer Todd Antony (previously) documents Bolivia’s best-dressed wrestlers in a new series, Flying Cholitas. The women, who are indigenous Aymara, compete in their sport wearing voluminous petticoats, colorful skirts, and long-sleeved lacy tops rather than in the minimal, form-fitting spandex worn by many athletes around the world.

These ensembles resemble ones that Aymara were expected—sometimes even required—to wear during five centuries of oppression under Spanish occupiers. The wrestlers wear these ensembles to show pride in their history and take back their visibility. Similarly, the identifier “cholita,” originally a derogatory term, has been reclaimed in recent years by indigenous Bolivians as a point of pride.

If you’re curious to see the athletes in action, Luisa Dörr and Michael James Johnson were commissioned by Apple to shoot a short documentary on the flying cholitas, which you can watch below. Aymara architect Freddy Mamani has also championed indigenous Bolivian aesthetics with his buildings, which we’ve covered previously on Colossal.

Explore more of Antony’s wide-ranging photography on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Tennis Balls and Swim Caps Crowd the Frame in New Time-Lapse Compositions by Pelle Cass

May 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Pelle Cass (previously) captures how humans interact with a location or an environment over time, presenting a visual history of the coincidences that occur. Over the last year and a half the Brookline, Massachusetts-based photographer has turned his lens to sports, framing sporting events from fencing to college football in order to create densely packed scenes that combine players from multiple images. During the course of one game or match he might take upwards of 1,000 photographs to provide the content for endless combinations of movements and poses. The final result is a still time-lapse photograph which condenses an hour or so of play into one dynamic image. Cass has a solo exhibition at Camerawork Gallery in Portland, Oregon that runs through May 31, 2019. You can see more of his dynamic series on his website and Instagram. (via Booooooom)