stop motion

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Art

Stop-Motion Animation Shows a Bird’s POV of the Exotic Pet Industry

August 18, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Animator and director Evan DeRushie‘s recent short film “Birdlime” is about an exotic breed that escapes capture just to find itself injured and caged anyway. Birdlime features handcrafted and stop-motion animated human hands, tropical trees, other birds, and gibberish sounds in place of dialogue. The colorful kid-friendly film shows the versatility of the medium for fun, engaging, and artful storytelling.

Inspired by a trip to Thailand and his introduction to the exotic pet industry, DeRushie had the idea to the tell the story from the bird’s point of view. The characters are made from dyed and painted cushion foam. Working alone, the animator designed everything so that it would last long shoots with limited camera angles and edits.

“Thinking about the way that animals are represented in animation, and the effects in the real world (like how clown fish populations were decimated directly after Finding Nemo), I started seeing animation as a powerful and scary tool,” DeRushie said in a statement. “With this in mind, I tried to portray a respectful relationship between human and animal, and to treat the bird without too much anthropomorphism. I also wanted the film to feel like you were in the cage with the main character, and to be a bit confused by the world.”

DeRushie is the co-owner of the Toronto-based animation studio Stop Motion Department Inc.. Prior to “Birdlime” he animated and set-supervised 2015’s The Little Prince and was a part of the team that animated the short film “The Fox and the Chickadee,” which played in numerous festivals around the world. To see more of his work, click through to his official website.

Images via Short of the Week

 

 



Animation

A New Stop Motion Animation Chronicles a Captain’s Final Journey to the Moon

July 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

The Moon’s Milk is a fantastical stop motion tale by animator Ri Crawford that follows Captain Millipede on his final trip to extract milk from the moon as it begins to separate itself from the Earth. During the journey, relationships between the expedition members complicate, while enchanting connections happen in the liminal space between the sea and moon. The film presents two unique views—the one from the Earth, and the flipped perspective seen from the moon. The score for the film was created by Caroline Penwarden, the sound design by Richard Beggs, and singer Tom Waits served as the story’s narrator. You can take a look behind-the-scenes of film in the video below, and see more of his animations on Vimeo. (via Laughing Squid)

Update: The Moon’s Milk narrative is originally told in “The Distance to the Moon,” a short story written in 1968 by the iconic Cuban-Italian author Italo Calvino. You can listen to actor Liev Schreiber read the story in its entirety on Radiolab.

 

 



Animation

Negative Space: The Vast Emotional Landscape of a Father-Son Relationship Packed into an Animated Short

July 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

We’ve written previously about “Negative Space”, and the highly-anticipated stop motion animation short is now available in its entirety on Vimeo. Co-directors Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata explore a character’s relationship with his father over his life, from fanciful childhood memories to the somber realities of aging and adulthood. “Negative Space” is adapted from a poem of the same name by Ron Koertge, which centers on the rituals of packing one’s possessions, passed from father to son.

You can step behind the scenes in a making-of video to see how the heartstring-tugging, Oscar-nominated film was created. Porter and Kuwahata share more of their animated films, including personal and commercial projects, on Vimeo.

 

 



Animation Food

Stop Motion Cooking Tutorials by Omozoc Transform Sporting Goods and Electronics Into Unconventional Meals

May 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

YouTube user omozoc uses common household appliances both inside and out of the kitchen to craft his delightfully creative stop motion “meals.” A baseball glove becomes the bun of a strangely enticing hot dog, while a cracked-open computer mouse makes an unusual batch of scrambled eggs on the top of an open copy machine. Each video is composed of thousands of images compiled by the user, who does not use Photoshop or CGI, and features an array of satisfying sound effects. Watch more of his invented cooking tutorials, like a sushi meal created from a business suit and an iPhone, in the videos below, or on his YouTube channel. If you enjoy these animations, also check out stop motion meals by PES.

 

 

 



Animation

Watch Sliced Fruits and Vegetables Disappear Before Your Eyes in Vibrant Animations by Kevin Parry

March 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kevin Parry creates stop-motion animations that turn the quotidian task of slicing vegetables and fruit into a near psychedelic exploration of each food’s interiors. Through a common technique called strata-cut, the Toronto-based animator creates videos that slowly peel away the exteriors of peppers, avocados, and onions, revealing patterns we might not notice while preparing a simple stir-fry or stew. Although Parry is used to taking his time perfecting each frame, for this series he had to race against the clock to avoid the organic materials browning or losing their vivacious color. Make sure to watch the full video below to take a look behind-the-scenes of his process, and hear the sound effects Parry created by cutting, crunching, and chewing each featured food. You can see more of his animations on Instagram and Youtube.

 

 



Animation

The Secret Lives of Objects Revealed in Juan Pablo Zaramella’s Trailer for Así son las cosas

March 3, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Argentinian director Juan Pablo Zaramella (previously) has shared the trailer for a cute new stop-motion television series featuring typically inanimate objects living out funny scenarios. With a title that translates in English to “The Way Things Are,” each episode in the series is one minute long and appears to focus on a different subject, from an egg catching a carton bus, to a stick of dynamite visiting a psychologist who also happens to be a pair of scissors. The sound effects and voices add to the humor. Though you’d need to know Spanish to understand the exact words, Zaramella’s scenes are universally comprehensible: a toothpaste man protests a blushing toothbrush bride’s vows, while  a roll of toilet paper demands access to an occupied bathroom.

The project won Zaramella the Audience Award at the Big Cartoon Festival 2018 and took 2nd prize at the Cyber Sousa / Xiamen International Animation Festival. His previous TV series, The Tiniest Man in World, blended stop-motion animation with live-action and is currently only available to watch if you live in Argentina. There is no word yet on when or where audiences can see Así son las cosas in full, but the two-minute trailer above is a great sample of what’s to come. It also shows the amount of time and detail that went into capturing every frame in order to tell the silly short stories. You can watch more of Zaramella’s films on Vimeo.

 

 

 



Animation

Wide-Mouthed Heads Consume and Absorb a Range of Mutable Forms in the Short Film “Distortion”

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish animator and sculptor Alexander Unger (previously here and here) creates stop motion animations and tutorials on his Youtube channel titled Guldies. His most recent claymation, Distortion, follows the transformation of eight dice-sized blue cubes into a series of limbs, puddles, and wide-mouthed heads that consume and absorb the previous clay form in rapid succession. Although captivating to watch, the sound effects add another dimension to the short film. Each metallic ting or watery bloop tricks the eye into believing the clay is harder or softer than it appears on screen. Watch out for a twist ending that ties the whole piece together as a beautiful looping narrative. (via Laughing Squid)