video

Posts tagged
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Animation Music

Hidden Patterns of Infrastructure Revealed in a Hypnotic New Music Video by Páraic Mc Gloughlin

June 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Another dizzying video by Páraic Mc Gloughlin (previously) pairs shots of architecture and infrastructure with electronic music. Mc Gloughlin’s latest work is for the band Weval’s track “Someday,” and features the filmmaker’s signature fusion of geometric shapes found in historical domes, skyscraper facades, and farmland irrigation systems. The tightly edited video shows quickly-passing frames that shift in time with the music, visually quaking or smoothly transitioning depending on the percussive and melodic elements of the song. Macro shots of escalator stairs and grates are interspersed with far-away aerial views of landscapes and forests, for a fast-paced tour of the patterns around us, hidden in plain sight. You can see more from Mc Gloughlin on Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 



Animation Art

A Hand-Painted Moth Animation by Allison Schulnik Explores Motherhood and Metamorphosis

June 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

A moth, or maybe many, mutates through several different forms throughout the course of painter, filmmaker, and ceramist Allison Schulnik‘s 2019 short film MOTH. The work is somewhat haunting in its painted portrayal of a constantly evolving subject. It transforms into larvae, serpents, other brightly colored moths, and a human to the song Gnossienne No. 1 by Erik Satie, performed by Nedelle Torrisi. The film was inspired by a moth that hit Schulnik’s window, and is described as “wandering through the primal emotions of birth, motherhood, body, nature, metamorphosis, and dance.”

Each animated paper slide is hand-painted with gouache and the project took the Sky Valley, California-based artist over 14 months to make. MOTH is currently on view as a part of the group exhibition Suffering From Realness at MASS MoCA through January 1, 2020. You can see more work by Schulnik on Instagram and Vimeo.

 

 



Animation Food

Stop Motion Cooking Tutorials by Omozoc Transform Sporting Goods and Electronics Into Unconventional Meals

May 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

YouTube user omozoc uses common household appliances both inside and out of the kitchen to craft his delightfully creative stop motion “meals.” A baseball glove becomes the bun of a strangely enticing hot dog, while a cracked-open computer mouse makes an unusual batch of scrambled eggs on the top of an open copy machine. Each video is composed of thousands of images compiled by the user, who does not use Photoshop or CGI, and features an array of satisfying sound effects. Watch more of his invented cooking tutorials, like a sushi meal created from a business suit and an iPhone, in the videos below, or on his YouTube channel. If you enjoy these animations, also check out stop motion meals by PES.

 

 

 



Art Photography

Multiverse: Hiroshi Kondo’s Dizzying Documentation of Taiwan’s Busy Streets

May 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Tokyo-based filmmaker Hiroshi Kondo captures the endless movement of urban environments in his fast-moving short films. Kondo often homes in on one specific element of city living, like street lights—or, in his new short film, scooter commuters. Multiverse follows riders as they move in swarms, their density highlighted through time-lapse. At certain moments, Kondo focuses on an individual rider, which emphasizes unique journeys within the teaming repetition. Multiverse’s music and sound design is by Himuro Yoshiteru. You can watch more of Kondo’s dizzying films on Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

An Endlessly Looping Path of Water Rushes Over Gallery Walls and Floors

May 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In Lupanar, an installation by French artist Nicolas Tourte, water flows on a never-ending path over the floor, walls, and ceiling of an art gallery. Displayed in a darkened room, the slithering 130-foot route shows a continuous video loop, which includes the rushing sound of the white-capped waves as they surge across the room. A statement about Lupanar on the artist’s website explains that the installation is meant to provoke thoughts about time and its persistent push through our individual and collective human experience.

The piece was originally shown in 2015 as part of the festival Interstice #10 in Caen, France, and was most recently exhibited at Base Sous-Marine, a former submarine base built during World War II, in Bordeaux. You can see more work from Tourte on his website and Instagram. (via Trendland)

 

 

 



Design Music

The Rhysonic Wheel Bridges Programmed Percussion with Acoustic Guitar for a Captivating One-Man Ensemble

May 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Wellington, New Zealand-based musician Pete O’Connell has previously used his Rhysonic Wheel, a self-made instrument that combines power tools with a self-spinning wheel, to create steady, melodic strumming on his acoustic guitar. Recently he has built another iteration of the device that spins several wheels at once, producing harmony between a drum, djembe, and any other percussive or stringed instrument he chooses to place in the path of the machine’s spinning wheels.

The invention was inspired by the rhythm that would rattle from the hockey cards attached to his childhood bicycle. Thinking back on this memory gave him the initial idea to incorporate a wheel into his music, which he has been experimenting with ever since. You can see more of O’Connell’s performances with early versions of the Rhysonic Wheel on his Youtube, Vimeo, and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 

 



Science

A Field Recording by Phil Torres Documents the Waterfall-like Sound of Millions of Migrating Monarch Butterflies

May 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Entomologist and TV host Phil Torres (previously) dives deep into the natural world to document sights and sounds that many of us will never have a chance to experience firsthand. In his most recent video, Torres showcases the sound created by millions of migrating monarchs. The iconic orange and black butterflies convene every year in Mexico, where they overwinter during the Northern Hemisphere’s cooler months. In Torres’ six minute video, monarchs cluster by the thousands on individual tree branches and swarm the forest air, creating a rushing, waterfall-like sound. We highly recommend listening to the video with a pair of earphones to really pick up the subtleties in the audio. You can see more of Torres’ outdoor explorations on his Youtube channel, The Jungle Diaries, and follow along on Twitter.