winter

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Photography

Black and White Photographs Capture the Striking Appearance of Bare Trees Against Snow-Filled Landscapes

December 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos by Pierre Pellegrini, Switzerland; Courtesy of the Galleria Valeria Bella Stampe, Milan, Italy.

All photos by Pierre Pellegrini, Switzerland; Courtesy of the Galleria Valeria Bella Stampe, Milan, Italy.

Swiss photographer Pierre Pellegrini is drawn to remote landscapes dotted by tree groves, snow-topped piers, and structures that have fallen into a state of disarray. Long exposure photographs force Pellegrini to sit quietly with these scenes, meditatively taking in the high contrast landscape as his camera processes the deep blacks and brilliant whites that emerge in the dead of winter. “I simply photograph what I feel, and am always looking for moments and situations where everything is in its place,” he explains to Colossal. “I try to find a sort of harmony between what I see and what I feel.” You can see more of his square format black and white photographs on Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

New Ceramics by Heesoo Lee Capture the Ephemeral Beauty of Seasonal Woodlands

December 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Heesoo Lee (previously) uses multi-layered techniques to form intricate trees, complete with leaves and branches, that seem to grow out of her functional ceramic vessels. Lee’s careful use of color establishes a seasonal mood in each of her works, some evoking the warm tones and fallen leaves of autumn, while others capture the barren beauty of winter. Each woodland scene is drawn from Lee’s imagination. The artist shares that she happened upon her current style of work by chance: her background is as a painter, and she used clay more as a smooth canvas until one day she was working on a tight deadline and was attempting to repair a broken pot, which inspired her to build three-dimensionally.

Lee explains that she uses translucent porcelain because its “beautiful clarity and color and is the perfect canvas for the bright underglaze and glazes I use.” The artist begins by forming each tree individually, starting with the closest and largest trees as she builds perspective by filling in the background with progressively smaller trunks, each of which is individually formed with a clay coil. Next, for her non-wintry pieces, each leaf is individually formed and applied to create the dense foliage that further increases the sense of depth on the surface of her ceramics. After an initial firing, Lee applies colored details using painted underglaze, which must be applied without overlapping different glazes to prevent discoloration after firing. Lastly, she chooses from a range of finishing glazes, selected depending on the desired effect, like an icy blue vernal pool or clearly defined leaves.

Lee shares that she first came to the United States, looking for freedom and adventure and with little knowledge of English, first living in Berkeley, California. She started re-exploring ceramics outside of the strictures of traditional Korean ceramics, rediscovering her love of the tactile medium after studying painting in college. Lee has been a working artist alongside her partner, a fellow ceramic artist for many years, and cites her time in residence at the Archie Bray Foundation as a seminal experience:

 My work, mostly in medium-range porcelain, expanded beyond painted surfaces, my mainstay for many years. I pushed my work beyond the motifs I had been using for many years–flowers, mostly–and built larger than I had before. I was inspired by my children, the landscape of the places where I lived, and my own childhood in Korea, and reflected these themes in my work. I found that working in a place like the Bray, surrounded by other artists who created a supportive, inviting, and welcoming community, gave me the freedom to grow as an artist.

Lee lives and works in Helena, Montana, where she has a home studio and kiln. You can see more of Lee’s in-progress and finished work on Instagram, and she also keeps her Etsy shop updated with new pieces available for purchase.

 

 



Photography

Frozen Landscapes Tell a Winter’s Tale in New Photographs by Kilian Schönberger

March 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

German photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) is known for capturing otherworldly images of his natural surroundings. His latest series, Winter’s Tale, was shot in the mountain ranges of Germany and central Europe and showcases the desaturated, hushed landscapes of snow-covered forests. Schönberger describes the mystical quality of his Winter’s Tale series: “Winter was the time when tales and legends were told at home, the whole family sitting around the tiled stove. The mystic figures are just waiting in front of the doorstep, snow and frost seem to make trees alive.”

The photographer shares with Colossal that challenging conditions are part of the game when shooting outdoors during the winter. Schönberger treks in with snowshoes or cross country skis, and sometimes waits two hours or more in frigid temperatures for the right shot, while battling shortened battery life and fickle sunlight that is needed to illuminate a scene without melting delicate frost. In addition to his Behance portfolio, you can see more of Schönberger’s work on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

An Illuminated Niagara Falls Captured in a January Freeze by Adam Klekotka

February 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Adam Klekotka, Licensed for use on Colossal

All images © Adam Klekotka, Licensed for use on Colossal

Toronto-based photographer Adam Klekotka had visited Niagara Falls several times during his time in Canada, but never journeyed to the massive waterfall during winter. After two weeks of record-setting temperatures this January (which led the Canadian news to report that parts of the country were colder than the surface of Mars) Klekotka decided to explore the icy waterfall at night, discovering an illuminated scene that appeared more like a deserted alien landscape than natural wonder.

“The temperature was about -20C, but due to cold wind and high humidity, it felt like it was way below -30C,” Klekotka told Colossal. “After some time of shooting, my hands were really frostbitten. Because of the small buttons in the cameras, I had to handle them without gloves. Additionally the drops of water were freezing on the front glass of the lens and I had to clean it every couple of seconds.”

Klekotka captured the glowing waterfall from several angles, including an observation deck encrusted with a thick layer of icicles. You can see more of Klekotka’s otherworldly images on his Instagram and browse a selection of his small prints on his online shop. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Amazing Photography

A Top Floor Sprinkler Leak Creates a 21-Story Tower of Icicles on a Chicago Fire Escape

January 11, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Andrew Hickey.

Late last week, a bitter cold snap that swept across the U.S. brought temporary chaos to Chicago’s south loop when a sprinkler system failed atop a 21-story hotel and storage facility. Water cascaded down a fire escape and quickly froze into a tower of ice. Street art photographer Andrew Hickey stopped by and captured some shots of the amazing sight before it was cleared up a few hours later.

 

 



Photography

Nearly Frozen ‘Slurpee’ Waves Surge off the Coast of Nantucket

January 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos © Jonathan Nimerfroh. Licensed for use on Colossal.

With single digit temperatures and massive snow storms sweeping the northern United States, it’s no surprise that most things are going to freeze. This includes the waves just off the shore of Nantucket, which turned into a slurry of rolling ice when temperatures dropped to 12 degrees Fahrenheit this week. On January 2nd photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh not only captured the phenomena of these partially frozen waves crashing against the shore, but also an extremely brave surfer (Jamie Briard) weathering the icy conditions.

“I ran up and down the beach, taking as many shots as I could of this freezing, fleeting show of nature,” Nimerfroh tells Colossal. “Slurpee waves are the kind of thing you might only be lucky enough to see once, so I count myself as very lucky to have seen them twice.”

Just two years ago the photographer captured waves of a similar slushy consistency off the same shore. You can follow more of Nimerfroh’s seaside photography on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Snow Covered Vending Machines Illuminate a Frozen Hokkaido

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

There are over five and a half million vending machines across Japan which sell a variety of merchandise from soda and cigarettes, to fresh eggs and flowers. These machines are not only scattered within the large city centers of the country, but also are common sights in smaller, more rural towns. The beverage dispensers are functional all night, serving as main a light source in remote areas without prevalent night life or street lamps.

Many vending machines populate the country’s prefecture of Hokkaido, a northern island that experiences harsh winters. Photographer Eiji Ohashi noticed how the light from these vending machines would illuminate surrounding snow, precipitation that had either piled on top of the machine or buried it completely. These glowing subjects became a source of intrigue for Ohashi who has created a series based on the machines titled Time to Shine.

“As dusk approaches, roadside vending machines light up in cities and in the outskirts,” says Ohashi in a statement. “These scenes of vending machines, ordinarily standing on the roadside, are particular to Japan. The vending machines downtown or in the wilderness, placed to stand in solitude, are an image of loneliness. They work tirelessly, whether it is day or night. But once their sales drop, they are taken away. If they do not glow and shine, they will stop existing. There might be something human about them.”

Ohashi compiled several of the images from his series into a photobook titled Roadside Lights. You can see other images from a snow-covered Hokkaido on his website. (via Spoon & Tamago)