wood

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Art Design

GHOSTKUBE: A Series of Interlocking and Buildable Block Transformations by Erik Åberg

December 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish designer Erik Åberg (previously) wanted to recreate the concept of origami out of wood, while focusing on how the objects moved, rather than their specific form. During these experiments he developed a system of interlocking, moveable cubes called GHOSTKUBE.  “I was searching for a precise, and organic life-like movement like a school of fish or a flock of birds,” explains Åberg. “There is something in human beings that when we see that kind of movement, the nature, we are drawn to it. I think we intuitively look for it.”

To create this fluid movement, the designer started with simple structures containing only two or three cubes. He then began to mirror and double their positions, discovering hundreds of versions of the original sculpture that could move, fold, open, walk across tables, and morph in all directions. GHOSTKUBE is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter for two similar packs of cubes, which either come with 12 or 24 single cubes to piece together. You can view larger and more complex experiments with the GHOSTKUBE system in the video directed by Oskar Wrangö below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Carved Wood Sculptures by Phil Young Appear to Stretch, Twist, and Tear Within Metal Armatures

December 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Grasp”

Artist Phil Young twists the commonly-held perception of wood as a stiff material in his mind-bending sculptures made of polished wood and metal. Each artwork focuses on a single piece of wood that has been carefully carved to appear as if it is being stretched, twisted, bound, or squashed, often by visible forces like metal rings or nails. Young works carefully with each bit of raw material, paying attention to its natural shape and grain as he transforms it into a finished work.

Although his work is non-representational, he is able to evoke a surprising degree of emotion through the dynamic pressure the pieces appear to be subjected to. “I wouldn’t be satisfied if all I did was make beautiful pieces,” the artist explains. “I want the people who see them to question what beauty is, so I take inspiration from places you wouldn’t expect to find beauty, including surgery, diseases, wounded or wrinkled skin, and try to make that look beautiful. I think if you can find beauty even in these places, you can find happiness wherever you are.” You can see more of Young’s woodwork on his website and Instagram. (via Lustik)

“Stretch”

“Twist”

“Crush”

“Crush” detail

“Taut”

“Nail”

“Pinch”

“Clamp”

 

 



Design History Illustration

Who’s She: A Laser-Cut Guessing Game That Celebrates Accomplished Women Throughout History

December 3, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Who’s She is a new guessing game by Polish designer Zuzia Kozerska (previously) which celebrates the achievements of famous women across the world. The laser-cut wooden board flips up to reveal the faces of 28 painters, athletes, scientists, and astronauts, in a similar style the classic Guess Who? game did from the late 1970s. Instead of posing superficial questions such as “does your character have glasses?” the game asks players to inquire about achievements and contributions like “did she win a Nobel Prize?”.

Faces range from the early 20th-century painter Frida Kahlo to contemporary athlete Serena Williams, all illustrated in watercolor portraits by artist Daria Gołąb. The game is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter. You can follow the evolution of the project on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Design

Solstice: A Wooden Kinetic Clock Expands and Contracts with the Passing Hours

November 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Solstice is a shape-shifting wooden clock designed by Matt Gilbert of the London-based studio Animaro. The new interior design object presents different configurations throughout the day, expanding to its widest form at noon when the sun is at its highest point, and contracting at 6 PM when the sun is near its lowest. This meditative movement was inspired by nature, specifically how a flower expands its petals to absorb more sunlight. The clock also is a return to our time-based roots, as its design has users rely on its shape and pattern much like we would a sundial.

The clock has two settings, one that completes a rotation every 60 seconds, and one that completes a rotation during a 12-hours cycle. To switch between the two modes, the user taps on a sensor located on the bottom of the clock. The Solstice clock is currently available for pre-order on Kickstarter. The crowdfunding campaign runs through December 13, 2018. You can see more of Animaro’s previous designs on their website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Oak Tree Roots Carved into Fantastical Creatures with Long Limbs by Tach Pollard

October 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

UK-based artist Tach Pollard transforms gnarled tree roots into fantastical creatures inspired by European folklore. The sleek sculptures have spindly legs and long cloaks, which give them each an air of mystery. Pollard began collecting tree roots when he was a child, but didn’t start carving them until much later in life. He predominantly works with oak tree roots, but has recently begun to work with hawthorn in the last few years.

 

 



Art

Charming Wooden Animal Sculptures Designed with Articulated Torsos and Tails by Jeff Soan

October 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Sculptor and toy maker Jeff Soan transforms discarded furniture, driftwood, industrial pallets, and other reclaimed wood into creatures of the land and sea. Using a self-described technique called “Wobbly Wood,” Soan creates articulation in his sculptures by scoring the wood into multiple sections along their tails and torsos. This allows them to wiggle and gently move side-to-side as they are picked up or stroked. In order to eliminate as much waste as possible, the artist considers future sculptures during the building of each otter, pangolin, or mollusk. He slices shapes that might make sense for the tail of a fish, while considering the beak of a bird, or the leg of an iguana.

Soan studied art and design at Goldsmiths College in London in the 1960s, and later followed up his art training with a course in toy making at the London College of Furniture. You can see more of his sculptures and examples of “Wobbly Wood” works on his website and Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Domestic Sculptures Formed With Wood Grown at the United States and Mexico Border by Hugh Hayden

September 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"America" (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Texas-born sculptor Hugh Hayden (previously) combines different varieties of wood to create furniture and other domestic objects with protruding spikes and branches. For his latest exhibition Border States at Lisson Gallery in New York City, Hayden addresses notions of citizenship and boundaries with sculptures made using wood indigenous to the United States and Mexico border. The traditional family ideals of the American Dream are evoked in objects such as a dining room table, picket fence, and child’s stroller, yet their source material speaks to the contentious practices upheld at our nation’s border.

Eastern Red Cedar, a wood from Texas with a pinkish interior, composes 
The Jones Part 3, a fence covered in branches which reach out at the audience from its vertical slats. “Texas Ebony,” a dark wood that grows at the border, composes another sculpture, while the weed-like Mesquite forms a kitchen table and chairs titled America.

Hayden currently lives and works in New York City. Border States runs at Lisson Gallery through October 27, 2018. You can see more of his politically-minded sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"America" (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"Cable News" (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Cable News” (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.<span style="color: #444444; font-size: 1rem;"> </span>

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"
The Jones Part 3" (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“
The Jones Part 3” (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

"Untitled (Wagon)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (Wagon)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

"Untitled (French gothic picket)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (French gothic picket)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery