Art

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Art

Surreal Paintings by Matthew Grabelsky Take the New York City Subway for a Wild Ride

June 12, 2018

Andrew LaSane

New York City is sometimes affectionately (or disaffectionately) referred to as a “concrete jungle,” but for Los Angeles-based artist Matthew Grabelsky it’s more of a big cageless zoo. Using the New York City subway system as the setting for his work, Grabelsky paints surreal portraits of people who are seemingly normal from the neck down, but who have had their heads replaced by animals, both wild and domesticated.

Having grown up in New York and being fascinated by the imagery of Greek mythology as a kid, Grabelsky’s paintings are an exploration of human nature and of the way that animals represent various parts of the human subconscious. “The characters are symbolic of the kinds of thoughts that lie under the surface of people’s minds, and they reveal that the most extraordinary can exist in the most ordinary of everyday settings,” the artist told Prohbtd in an interview. “This theme is communicated through the juxtaposition of these ostensibly irrational images with otherwise completely mundane scenes. My idea is that my creatures are not original but are ultimately part of a much larger cultural continuum.”

Since graduating Cum Laude from Rice University in 2002 with a BA in Art and Art History (and a BS in Astrophysics), Matthew Grabelsky has shown in dozens of group exhibitions and solo shows around the world. In 2017 he was tapped by electronic musician Moby to paint an album cover featuring a father cow reading a book to his calf. To see more of Grabelsky’s work, follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

Vibrant Paper Fruits and Vegetables by Ann Wood Look Good Enough to Eat

June 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Ann Wood (previously) continues her transformation of plain paper into juicy-looking fruits and verdant vegetables. Using careful layers of paint, the artist captures the varied colors and textures of  fuzzy peaches, russeted apples, soil-topped beets, and shiny citrus. In a statement on her website, Wood describes her work as “mixed media portraits and theatrical tableaus of mysterious beauty and solace whose identity is grounded in the timeless aesthetic and ethic of rural America.” You can see more of Wood’s paper creations on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Incredibly Intricate Glasswork by Janis Miltenberger is Inspired by Mythology

June 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Cynara’s Lush Gift, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, bee created by Wesley Fleming, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D. All images used with permission of the artist.

Glass artist Janis Miltenberger draws on the roles of mythology and storytelling as attempts to explain our experience of the world to build complex glass sculptures. Her work often takes the shape of recognizable objects, like human figures and chairs, which are then filled with incredible detail. The artist uses borosilicate glass, and enhanced with glass colors, gold luster, sandblasting, and oil paint. 

Miltenberger shares with Colossal that she was originally drawn to ceramics, and discovered glassblowing in college, where she apprenticed with Richard Marquis. Many years later, she was introduced to lampworking, which is her preferred technique today. She explains, “working alone with a torch was more personal and I don’t think I was quite as aware at that point how I needed that space set apart to focus and identify my ideas and voice.”

The artist’s most recent series, “Doctrine of Signatures,” is based on The Signature of All Things, a 17th century book by Jakob Boehme which detailed the commonly-held belief that the outward appearance of a plant reflected its medicinal value. She is currently working on a large installation that moves away from her decorative style. In fall 2018, Miltenberger will be teaching in Niijima, Japan, and her work will be shown at the Bellevue Art Museum in Washington state. (via Lustik)

Cynara’s Lush Gift (detail), Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, bee created by Wesley Fleming, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Golden Memory, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Golden Memory (detail), Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Doctrine of Signatures, Photographer Lynn Thompson, 38″H x 14″W x 13″D

Doctrine of Signatures (detail), Photographer Lynn Thompson, 38″H x 14″W x 13″D

Golden Tinged Hope, Photographer Lynn Thompson, 84”H x 24”L x 13”D

Golden Tinged Hope (detail), Photographer Lynn Thompson, 84”H x 24”L x 13”D

Dividing Line, wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 34”H x 16”L x 4.5”D

Dividing Line (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 34”H x 16”L x 4.5”D

Quiet Breath, wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

Quiet Breath (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

Quiet Breath (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

 

 



Art

Metal Utensils Precisely Embedded in Vintage Canning Jars by Jennifer Halvorson

June 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Detail of "Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Glass artist Jennifer Halvorson manipulates vintage canning jars into sculptural portraits tied to memories of making fruit preserves with her family. The antique vessels are each imbedded with utensils that fit perfectly into indentations pressed into the side of the glass objects, and placed in arrangements that connect to her personal narrative.

To create the works, Halvorson slowly warms the jars and then attaches them to a metal rod. After raising the temperature of the pieces, she then carefully torches one area and delicately presses a metal knife, spoon, or fork into the soft interior. “The result of the transformation allows the cutlery to fit perfectly into the jar, showing an active presence within the nostalgic object, but with the absence of a person,” she tells Colossal.

Halvorson has begun to make her own glass jars through rubber molds, wax molding, metal casting, and hot glass blowing molds for her series Preserve Words. Five pieces from this series will be included in the group exhibition Reflections at Momentum Gallery in Asheville, North Carolina from July 1 to August 25, 2018. You can see more of Halvorson’s glass interventions and sculptures on her website.

"Waste not want not," Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“Waste not want not,” Jelly jars, cutlery, stainless steel, 8.75 x 16.25 x 9 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"What's good for the goose is good for the gander," Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“What’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” Jelly jars, cutlery, dried flowers, wood frame, 22.5 x 29 x 4 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Perfect Influence," Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Perfect Influence,” Blown glass, tatted lace, found objects, 9.5 x 9 x 6 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

“From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of "From small beginnings come great things," Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

Detail of “From small beginnings come great things,” Jelly jars, cutlery, flame worked glass, stainless steel, 12 x 16 x 6 inches, photo credit: Elizabeth Torgerson-Lamark

"Genuine Relation," Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Genuine Relation,” Blown glass, cast bronze, found objects, 6.5 x 10.5 x 6.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of "Supreme Endeavor," Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

Detail of “Supreme Endeavor,” Blown glass, cast glass, found objects, 9.5 x 22 x 9.25, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

"Good Luck Impulse," Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

“Good Luck Impulse,” Blown glass, cast iron, found objects, 9 x 4 x 4.5 inches, photo credit: Serena Nancarrow

 

 



Art Design

A Project to Immortalize David Bowie in Traditional Woodblock Prints

June 7, 2018

Johnny Strategy

David Bowie, who passed away in 2016, had a very special connection – some may even call it a “love affair” – with Japan. He originally developed his affinity after taking an interest in Kabuki and was heavily influenced by the exaggerated gestures, costumes and make-up. He later went on to work with fashion designer Kansai Yamamoto on many iconic costumes, as well as with musicians like Tomoyasu Hotei and the filmmaker Nagisa Oshima. In a sense, the love affair has come full circle and now a project has been announced to immortalize David Bowie in the form of ukiyo-e woodblock prints that depict Bowie in elements of kabuki.

Two unique prints were announced last month from Ukiyo-e Project, an organization that creates contemporary Ukiyo-e based on elements of pop culture. Each of the prints are inspired by iconic photo shoots of Bowie, which have been translated to woodblock print by ukiyo-e artist Masumi Ishikawa.

One of these is inspired by Brian Duffy’s photograph of a bare-chested Bowie with a red lightning bolt scrawled across his face the cover of “Aladdin Sane” (1973). For the ukiyo-e print, the artist imagines Bowie as Kidomaru, a fictitious snake charmer from the Kamakura period.

The second print was inspired by Terry O’Neill’s “Diamond Dogs” promotional photograph (1974) in which Bowie is posing with a large barking dog. For this ukiyo-e print the artist imagines Bowie as Takezawa Toji, a magician and entertainer who was often depicted by Utagawa Kuniyoshi.

The prints will be on display, and available for sale (priced at 100,000 yen) at the Marc Jacobs-owned BOOKMARC in Omotesando from June 23 – July 1, 2018. The final prints will be displayed alongside photos of David Bowie, as well as other materials that show the process of creating the woodblock prints. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

left: David Bowie, Aladdin Sane, Eyes Open, 1973© Courtesy of the Duffy Archive | right: Terry O’Neill – David Bowie Diamond Dogs, 1974 © Courtesy Mouche Gallery

 

 



Art Design

An Olafur Eliasson-Designed Building Only Accessible by Footbridge in a Danish Fjord

June 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Fjordenhus is a recently completed structure built on the Vejle Fjord in Denmark only accessible by footbridge. It is the first structure fully designed by the studio of Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson (previously), and was inspired by the harbor’s architecture. The 970,000-brick building is built several yards into the water from the shore, with the surrounding body of water acting as its moat.

The complexly curved form contains four intersecting cylinders which are carved to present a pattern of concave and convex walls, and is dotted with several arched windows and openings to the sea. “The outer walls, which are normally seen as a membrane between inside and outside, are spaces in Fjordenhus,” explains the studio. “You are offered the opportunity to be both inside and outside.”

The structure will hold the offices for investment company KIRK KAPITAL, yet will contain a ground floor open to the public with site-specific art installations designed by Eliasson. Fjordenhus took nearly a decade of planning to implement and build, and is considered both an architectural structure and a work of art. You can learn about more projects designed by Eliasson’s studio on their website. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Art Photography

Giant Humans Overtake Landscapes in Guillaume Chiron’s Clever Collages

June 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Collage artist Guillame Chiron combines myths of the wild west and mid-century domestic life in humorous collages. Playing with scale and context, Chiron inserts oversized humans into urban landscapes, or shrinks down people to fit astride cats or on meteors in the galaxy. Chiron has also published a book of 250 collages. You can see more of the French artist’s collages on Tumblr and Instagram. (via Lustik)