Category: Art

Recent Surveillance Camera and Satellite Dish ‘Nests’ by Jakub Geltner 

Czech artist Jakub Geltner (previously) has been clustering groups of technological equipment in public spaces since 2011, creating installations that address the heightened state of surveillance in our contemporary world. Arranged as ‘nests,’ the sculptures interrupt both natural landscape and urban environments, making the viewer innately aware of how closely they are being watched.

One of Geltner’s latest installations is Nest 06, is a group of cameras installed alongside a pathway leading to the beach in Sydney, Australia created for Sculpture by the Sea. Attached to a curved pole, the devices stare directly down at any passersby with over a dozen watchful eyes. Nest 7, another recent work, dots the side of an aging brick building at Chateau Třebešice, bringing surveillance to the countryside rather than a bustling urban setting.

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Figural Lace Sculptures Attached to Found Wood by Agnes Herczeg 

Hungarian artist Agnes Herczeg creates figural lace works of female forms, capturing figures in moments of contemplation or work. In one piece the subject stands at a loom, appearing to weave herself from the included fibers. In each of her works Herczeg uses all natural materials, incorporating small pieces of wood or other found materials to serve as a sculpture’s bed frame, hair accessory, floating vessel, or small shelf.

Herczeg studied textile conservation at the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, and over the years has gathered several methods of embroidery and lace-making to use in her work such as needle lace, pillow lace, macramé, and more. You can purchase her lace sculptures directly from her website, both attached to found natural objects and as individual lace works. (via Metafilter)

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Miniature Scenes With A Darkly Satirical Twist by Frank Kunert 

German photographer Frank Kunert builds miniature scenes that at first glance appear like mundane depictions of everyday domestic and urban settings. However after glancing at the photographs longer, one is able to dissect the strange anomalies found in his playgrounds, kitchens, and parks, noticing that his half pipe has the markings of a tennis court and his children’s slide leads straight onto a busy highway.

“On the surface, these photographs confront us with all of the hollow words, catchphrases and banalities we encounter in our daily lives,” says Dr. Christine Donat, who provided the text for Kunert’s online portfolio. “The stereotypical and senseless aspects of human communication cannot be unveiled more convincingly than in their literal conversion into a visual medium.”

The works are a part of Kunert’s series Photographs of Small Worlds, handcrafted models that play with the audience’s perception through the use of darkly satirical twists. Each miniature set is created over the course of several weeks to months, and are not captured until they can perfectly convey the scene without digital assistance.

Kunert’s upcoming solo exhibition at the Museum Boppard from September 10 to January 28, 2018 shares the same name as his most recent photo book, Wunderland. You can view more of his miniature works and past photo books on his website. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

 

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A Turbulent Black Sea Fills a Three-Story Wall in Kiev, Ukraine 

London-born and Cape Town-based artist Jake Aikman paints scenes that aim to capture the mysterious nature of environments at the edge of civilization, producing dramatic seascapes and dense patches of tropical forests in his oil paintings. His latest work moves from canvas to wall, upscaling his practice for the first time to produce a three-story tall mural of a stormy Black Sea. The two-layer public painting was produced for Art United Us over nine days last month in Kiev, Ukraine. You can see more of Aikman’s work on his Instagram and through SMAC Gallery where he is represented. (via Brooklyn Street Art)

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Dripping Glass Fusion “Jellyfish” Sculptures by Daniela Forti 

Artist Daniela Forti lives and works in Chianti, Tuscany where she produces these fantastic artworks of dripped glass. She refers to the pieces as “Jellyfish” because of their undulating tentacles that are formed by hand through a melted glass fusion process. Each piece appears to balance like a small platter or table atop colorful, spindly drips that somehow manage to support the weight above. Many examples of her work are on view (and also available) over at Artemest.

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Gloopy Ice Cream Paint Brushes Photographed by José Lourenço 

As part of an ongoing project titled “Ice Cream,” Portuguese visual artist José Lourenço photographs swirls of thick paint atop brushes in a form reminiscent of melting ice cream cones. The rainbow-hued brushes ooze with layers of sherbert-y color that look good enough to eat. Lourenço documents a wide range of colorful interventions and artworks on his Instagram account. (via Designboom)

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