Art

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Animation Art Design Science

Infinite Forms Unfurl in New Rotating Sculptures by John Edmark

August 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

We continue to be transfixed by John Edmark’s (previously) infinite 3-D printed designs. The self-described artist, designer, and inventor uses visual tricks to create cascading effects on rotating textured white sculptural surfaces. His most recent video, “Blooms Assortment”, features a noodle-like form, shifting cubes, and a hollow gridded shape that resembles a geyser or mushroom cloud. Edmark has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in computer science and has lectured at Stanford’s design program for over fifteen years.  See more of Edmark’s creations on Vimeo and if you’d like to call one of his pieces your own, visit his online store.

 

 



Art

Thread Recreations of Famous Paintings Produced by Mathematical Algorithms

August 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Moscow-based programmer Ani Abakumova uses algorithms to organize lengths of colored thread into the style of classic paintings. Although the mathematical formulas for the placement of each thread are created on her computer, Abakumova performs the labor of attaching each string in the correct order and pattern. She works exclusively on circular hoops, narrowing her focus on the subject of each painting such as the Mona Lisa or the Girl with a Pearl Earring. You can see more of Abakumova’s threaded recreations on Instagram. (via Design You Trust)

 

 



Art

Banal Moments Contorted into Surreal Stoneware Sculptures by Genesis Belanger

August 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Genesis Belanger twists and stretches familiar objects into surreal scenarios with her stoneware, porcelain, and concrete sculptures. The Brooklyn-based artist frequently depicts detached limbs, misplaced teeth, and unusually located food in her work. One sculpture shows a mustard-topped hot dog disappearing into a handbag with a mouth-like zipper; another series dispenses rocks from dysfunctional quarter candy machines. This spring, a stoneware desk topped with flaccid pens, a tape-like tongue dispenser, and a drawer full of coping mechanisms was on view in the New Museum’s store window gallery. Belanger earned an MFA at Hunter College and a BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Explore more of her unusual sculptures on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Rainbow-Streaked Interventions by Elsa Tomkowiak Add Intrigue to Covered Bridges and Lakes

August 5, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Elsa Tomkowiak creates color-focused installations that divide the rainbow into designs that span bridges, light-filled corridors, and large-scale sculptures on water. Tomkowiak’s work is currently exhibited as a part of the second edition of Annecy Paysages in southeastern France. For the outdoor exhibition, Tomkowiak arranged six 15-foot spheres along Lake Annecy which visitors can glance at from the Albigny promenade through September 15, 2019. You can see more of her colorful interventions both indoors and out on Instagram.

 

 

 

 



Art

Peaceful Portraits Shaped from Bunched and Layered Netting by Benjamin Shine

August 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

For his “flow” series, artist and designer Benjamin Shine crafts portraits of serene faces using lightweight tulle fabric. The fine netted material allows for dramatic differences in opacity depending on how densely it is is bunched or layered. In his artist statement, Shine explains that his work “centers on ideas of energy, impermanence and the relationship between the spiritual and the superficial.” With his most recent sculpture, “Quietude”, Shine scaled up his signature portraits and built an outdoor sculpture that measures over eight feet tall. The fuchsia-toned sculpture was made an 80 by 20 foot piece of recycled high density polyethylene shaped around a steel frame, and its color shifts as natural light changes throughout the day. Take a peek inside Shine’s studio in the video interview below, and see more of his work on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Fine and Street Art Aesthetics Merge in Anthony Lister’s Expressive Murals

August 4, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Australian artist Anthony Lister paints illustrative murals that blur the line between street art and fine art. The subjects on his walls range from figurative paintings of dancing ballerinas, to large scale portraits with rosy cheeks and red noses. Lister’s unique style is a result of his early influences and experience with graffiti, as well as his formal art education at Queensland College of Art and mentorship with New Zealand artist Max Gimblett.

For Lister, blending styles and exploring aesthetic ideas through what he calls “adventure painting” is something that came with time. “I used to try and keep all of my disciplines quite separate from each other, or at least I thought that was what I was doing,” he told Lost At E Minor. “Over time, I slowly let go of keeping one style and approach isolated from the other and so they quite organically and slowly merged to be what it is today.”

Explaining the difference in emotion between his studio work and his street faces (and why he use his full name for the former and his surname for the latter), Lister told LiveFastMag that “a face on the street represents freedom. When I’m painting on the street I don’t want to sweat over problems that I don’t feel comfortable solving in the public world or in front of an audience, because that’s often what painting in public turns into. [In the studio] I’m thinking conceptually and aesthetically, reflecting about anti-beauty, adventure painting and problem solving; whereas on the street I try to keep it simpler for myself.”

Anthony Lister has an upcoming solo exhibition titled “Modern Masters” opening at Mirus Gallery in Denver, Colorado on September 6. For updates on the show and to see more of his studio work and street art, follow Lister on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art Design

The Full English Alphabet Painted on Store Shutters in 26 Different Fonts by Ben Eine

August 3, 2019

Andrew LaSane

PHOTO CREDIT: OurTypes 2019

Nearly a decade after completing the “Alphabet Street” project in East London, English artist Ben Eine has again painted all 26 letters from A to Z on over 40 shop shutters. “Alphabet City 2.0” uses 26 bespoke fonts and a wide range of spray paint colors to transform the area into a vibrant street art destination.

Made in association with Global Street Art and the Poplar Housing and Regeneration Community Association (HARCA), the “Alphabet Street” shows the evolution of Eine’s style over the past 30 years. Bold letters emerge from the metal shutters with deep drop shadows and layered graphic elements. Each glyph has its own personality and dimensionality that allows it to stand alone while also being a part of the larger set.

It’s that exploration of type that Eine and his team are bringing to clients with their new creative agency; “Alphabet Street” also marks the launch of Eine’s new creative design studio, Our Types. “Our minds are always busy, even when sleeping, it refuses to rest,” he said in a statement. “It is the only true tool for manipulating the world about us. Our Types is going to be the visual drug your brain has been looking for.”

To learn more about Our Types’ fonts and projects, visit the agency’s website. To see more of Ben Eine’s street art, follow the artist/creative director on Instagram.