Category: Photography

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland Infrared: Stark Photographs of Icelandic Landscapes by Andy Lee landscapes infrared Iceland

Iceland, with its extreme landscapes, jagged lava fields and Northern Lights, is arguably one of the most photogenic countries in the world. So it’s no surprise that over half a million tourists flock there every year to shoot the landscape. But UK-based photographer Andy Lee, on his first visit to the country, came back with a series of photos titled “Blue Iceland” that captured the waterfalls, peaks and roads in, literally, a whole new light. Using infrared photography to pick up invisible light rather than visible light, Lee transformed Iceland into a series of stark, moody and somewhat dreamlike silhouettes. At times the austere rock formations and glowing waterfalls almost appear to be painted. You can see much more of Lee’s work over on his portfolio site. In the words of Lee himself, “Infrared and Iceland, a match made in heaven.” (via PetaPixel)

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Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Lungs

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Intestines

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Heart

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Eye

Eye Heart Spleen: Human Organs Made from Flowers and Plants by Camila Carlow plants flowers anatomy
Kidneys

This delicate series of sculpted plants is part of a project by artist Camila Carlow titled Eye Heart Spleen. The photographic project is comprised of 13 images representing human organs constructed from plants and flowers. From Carlow’s statement about the project:

The most fascinating and intricate of biological structures, yet we rarely pay heed to the organs inside our body. Regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not—our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed.

In a similar way, plants flourishing in the urban environment are a testament to nature’s indifference to our goings on. They grow out of the sides of buildings, in brick walls and between the cracks in concrete, despite of the traffic and pollution.

Camila Carlow is a Guatemalan-born artist based in Bristol, England, and she works in a range of mediums from photography and painting as well as cinematography. Several of the Eye Heart Spleen photos are available as prints in her shop. (via Sweet Station)

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Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Sunny Meadow Fun Park. Edition of 50, 590 x 590mm.

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Skhayascraper. Edition of 20, 590 x 840mm.

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Langa Longer Shopping Mall. Edition of 50, 590 x 630mm.

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Bridge Below Starry Skies. Editions of 50, 590 x 490mm.

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Gugulethu Gables. Edition of 50, 590 x 590mm.

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Glory to Gold. Edition of 10, 940 x 770mm.

Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett architecture
Diepsloot dignity tower. Edition of 50, 590 x 590mm.

Con/struct is the latest body of work from Cape Town-based artist, designer, and photographer Justin Plunkett who uses his own original photography to digitally construct fictional landscapes and structures. He shares via an artist statement:

Con/Struct is an exploration into the themes of empowerment and imagination. Plunkett, using his own photography, has created new juxtaposed environments that encourage questioning and exploration: inviting the debate around how marketing- induced aspiration and perceived value can empower but can also corrupt, how it can be both perverse and create beauty. At the same time, at the core of his work, he honours and applauds ingenuity and the creative spirit.

The new works were recently on view at the Cabinet, and you can see more on his website. (via Designboom)

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A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

At the age of 14, photographer Cory Richards had dropped out of high school and was technically homeless. His education, he says, was instead obtained through the observation of struggle. Through various forms of discomfort and adventure he would eventually become the first American to successfully summit an 8,000-meter peak in winter (Pakistan’s Gasherbrum II), and launch an incredible career in photography through the pages of National Geographic.

Brooklyn-based digital media company Blue Chalk recently sat down with Richards to discuss his motivations and driving desire to connect with the people he photographs. (via ISO 1200, PetaPixel)

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A Surreal Photoshoot on an Underwater Shipwreck in Bali

A Surreal Photoshoot on an Underwater Shipwreck in Bali  surreal portraits fantasy conceptual boats Bali

A Surreal Photoshoot on an Underwater Shipwreck in Bali  surreal portraits fantasy conceptual boats Bali

A Surreal Photoshoot on an Underwater Shipwreck in Bali  surreal portraits fantasy conceptual boats Bali

A Surreal Photoshoot on an Underwater Shipwreck in Bali  surreal portraits fantasy conceptual boats Bali

A Surreal Photoshoot on an Underwater Shipwreck in Bali  surreal portraits fantasy conceptual boats Bali

Taken recently off the coast of Bali, these surreal photos are the creation of Montreal-based director and photographer Benjamin Von Wong, known for his exceedingly difficult photoshoots. Where it might be more practical to create the complex aspects of these photos digitally, Von Wong took a different path and assembled a team of two models who also happen to be trained freedivers, 7 additional support divers, and obtained special permission to utilize a 50-year-old underwater shipwreck. The entire shoot took place 25 meters below the surface, and because of the extreme conditions and limitations, he relied heavily on natural light to create the final images you see here.

You can watch the video above to see how the photoshoot came together and read more about the process over on his blog. (via PetaPixel, My Modern Met)

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From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, 13′ x 26′ (400cm x 800cm), Epson Ultragiclee print on Epson fine art paper

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

From the New World: A Sprawling Digital Collage of a Dystopian Future by Yang Yongliang landscapes digital collage China
From the New World, detail

In his largest artwork to date, Chinese artist Yang Yongliang (previously here and here) just unveiled From the New World, a sprawling digital collage depicting an overpopulated, futuristic landscape completely overrun with construction, debris, and high-rise skyscrapers. The new artwork is a continuation of Yongliang’s ongoing commentary about the devastating effects of unchecked development and industrialization through the use of dense, photography-based collage. From the New World measures almost 26 feet wide (800cm) by 13 feet tall, and while it’s impossible to truly appreciate it online, you can see many more detail shots over on his website.

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Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid-Bath by Sophie Gamand

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

Wet Dog: Quirky Portraits of Dogs Captured Mid Bath by Sophie Gamand portraits humor dogs

New York photographer Sophie Gamand has spent the last four years photographing dogs as part of a larger project to better understand humans. Her latest series, Wet Dog, captures hilarious and awkward photos of small dogs as they are bathed with the help of professional groomer Ruben Santana in the Bronx. Fascinated by the domestication of dogs as one of the first forms of artificial selection, Gamand explores the differences and similarities in animals and humans, making the the distinction that dogs ceased being “animals” long ago as they acquired human attributes and became pets.

The Wet Dog series won first place in the Portraiture category of the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards, and the photos you see here will be included in a book to be published by Grand Central Publishing in the fall of 2015. Prints are available here, and you can also follow Gamand on Instagram. All images courtesy the photographer. (via Feature Shoot)

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