Category: Photography

Lola Dupré’s Fragmented Photograph Collages Appear as Funhouse Mirror Reflections

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Heavily influenced by the Dada aesthetic, Lola Dupré’s surreal collages bend and expand the traditional view of both object and human form. With a wide focus of subject matter it seems as if no human or animal can escape Dupré’s focus, her subjects ranging from famous presidents and celebrities to giraffes and hound dogs.

Each work includes some sort of distortion to the original image, either by the artist multiplying limbs or elongating torsos and faces into unnatural poses. Although the work appears digitally manipulated, the collage artist and illustrator uses paper and scissors as her medium, utilizing thousands of paper paper shards to produce her funhouse-like imagery.

Since 2000 Dupré has lived and worked in multiple countries, creating her detailed collages in countries such as Scotland, Switzerland, France, Portugal, and Spain. Currently the artist is located in Limerick, Ireland and is represented by Los Angeles-based CES Gallery. More of Dupré’s eerie work can be found on her Tumblr and Facebook page.

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themis with lisa carletta lola dupre

parker the noble lola dupre

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exploding charles darwin lola dupre

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Photographer Jorge Cervera Hauser Captures Sea Creatures Against Sun-Drenched Oceanscapes

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Jorge Cervera Hauser produces intimate snapshots of underwater creatures, effortlessly capturing their magnificence as they glide through the sea in schools or pairs. Each image displays moments that look as if they were captured in a split-second, yet simultaneously appear dramatically staged. Most of the images included were taken either in Baja or the Mexican Caribbean, and the image of the shark gliding alone through turquoise water was taken at Tiger Beach in the Bahamas. No matter the location, each photograph was taken far away from human life and miles out in the open ocean.

The Mexico City-based artist is also a film producer, yet his true passion lies with the animals he captures within his photography. Along with a few friends he runs a marine conservation NGO called Pelagic Life, which aims to conserve the Mexican open ocean through eco-tourism. Through his organization Cervera Hauser produced the documentary “Mexico Pelagico” which has already been released in Mexico and will be available on Netflix June 1st. More images of Cervera Hauser’s underwater voyages can be seen on his online portfolio here.

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A Photographer Captures a 37-Minute Exposure of the Moon Streaking Across the Sky

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A Finnish photographer who goes by the name of Janne recently perfected a technique for shooting a “moon trail,” similar to long exposures you’ve probably seen of stars in the night sky. The photograph required over 37 minutes to shoot as the moon made its way slowly across the landscape. Michael Zhang from PetaPixel explains a bit of the technical details:

Janne was shooting with a Nikon D800 and 100-300mm lens at 300mm, f/8, and ISO 100. The trick behind the shot was a 10-stop neutral density filter, which greatly cut down the amount of light hitting the sensor and allowed Janne to shoot a 2258-second exposure.

You can see the moon trail a bit larger here, and see more of Janne’s photos from around Finland on Flickr. (via PetaPixel)

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Double Exposure Animal Portraits by Andreas Lie

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Norwegian visual artist Andreas Lie merges verdant landscapes and photographs of animals to creates subtle double exposure portraits. Snowy mountain peaks and thick forests become the shaggy fur of wolves and foxes, and even the northern lights appear through the silhouette of a polar bear. Lie is undoubtedly influenced by his surroundings in Bergen, Norway, a coastal city surrounded by seven mountains. Many of these are available as prints and other objects on Society6. (via Beautiful/Decay, Blu)

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Fascinating Satellite Photos of Seaweed Farms in South Korea

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NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center just shared these fascinating satellite photos taken in January 2014 over the shallow waters around Sisan Island, South Korea. The tiny patchwork of small squares are entire fields of seaweed that are held in place with ropes and buoys to keep the plants near the surface during high tide but off the seafloor in low tide. Via NASA Earth Observatory:

Since 1970, farmed seaweed production has increased by approximately 8 percent per year. Today, about 90 percent of all the seaweed that humans consume globally is farmed. That may be good for the environment. In comparison to other types of food production, seaweed farming has a light environmental footprint because it does not require fresh water or fertilizer.

You can see much more of what’s happening at NASA lately by following the Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr.

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Dreamlike Autochrome Portraits of an Engineer’s Daughter From 1913 Are Among the Earliest Color Photos

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Mervyn O’Gorman (1871-1958) is best known as one of the greatest British engineers, and during WW1 was head of the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. O’Gorman was also known as an early pioneer of color photography, and was an artist in addition to his interest aeronautics. Many of his images are included in exhibitions referencing early color photography, including this dreamlike series of his daughter Christina using the Autochrome process in 1913. The Autochrome process, patented in 1903, was the first fully practical single-plate color process that was accessible to the public.

The beach images are from Lulworth Cove, Dorset and feature her in a bright red swimming costume—a color the early process captured well. Christina is also captured in red in every other scene, drawing the eye immediately to the subject and her long strawberry blonde hair. The up-close image of Christina has an oddly modern feel as her clothing is hard to pin to a singular time period. O’Gorman’s wife Florence and second daughter are featured in the last portrait, the photographer’s camera box seen just to the left of his family. (via PetaPixel, Mashable, and National Media Museum)

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Large Format Photographs Capture Ornate Opera Houses From Around the World

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All images © David Leventi, Margravial Opera House, BAYREUTH, GERMANY, 2008

David Leventi photographs the interiors of world famous opera houses, capturing the ornate design of the architecture found inside. Using 4×5″ and 8×10″ Arca-Swiss cameras, Leventi captures each opera house from the vantage of an operatic singer, photographing the space from the very center of the stage.

Leventi is not just aesthetically inspired by the opera houses he photographs, but also holds a familial connection to their structures. He is the son of two architects, and the project was started in remembrance of his grandfather Anton Gutman, a cantor trained after World War II by a famous Danish operatic tenor. Gutman performed for prisoners and officers while interned at a prisoner-of-war camp in the Soviet Union, and Leventi’s photographs are a gesture that aims to examine the spaces he was never able to perform.

Leventi’s photographic process imitates with light what a performer would do with his or her voice, light waves bouncing off of each architectural element and bringing the vast space back to the detailed image. Each photograph captures a view impossible to the naked eye, combing both line-of-sight and periphery imagery to produce images that wrap the viewer in the experience of each world famous theatre. Leventi is not just capturing the depth of the space, but also the extensive history lived within each performance hall.

Leventi received his BFA in Photography from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and is represented by galleries internationally. Leventi’s exhibition “David Leventi: Opera” will open May 7 at Rick Wester Fine Art in New York City, and his first monograph by the same name (published by Damiani) will be released this spring. (via Arch Atlas)

All images © David Leventi, Romanian Athenaeum BUCHAREST, ROMANIA, 2007

Romanian Athenaeum BUCHAREST, ROMANIA, 2007

La Fenice VENICE, ITALY, 2008

La Fenice VENICE, ITALY, 2008

Curtain, Palais Garnier PARIS, FRANCE, 2009

Curtain, Palais Garnier PARIS, FRANCE, 2009

Palais Garnier PARIS , FRANCE, 2009

Palais Garnier PARIS , FRANCE, 2009

The Metropolitan Opera NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, 2008

The Metropolitan Opera NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, 2008

Teatro di Villa Aldrovandi Mazzacorati BOLOGNA, ITALY, 2014

Teatro di Villa Aldrovandi Mazzacorati BOLOGNA, ITALY, 2014

Mariinsky Theater ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA, 2009

Mariinsky Theater ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA, 2009

Teatro di San Carlo NAPLES, ITALY, 2009

Teatro di San Carlo NAPLES, ITALY, 2009

Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía VALENCIA, SPAIN, 2014

Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía VALENCIA, SPAIN, 2014

Amargosa Opera House, DEATH VALLEY JUNCTION, CALIFORNIA, 2009

Amargosa Opera House, DEATH VALLEY JUNCTION, CALIFORNIA, 2009

Curtain, Royal Swedish Opera, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN, 2008

Curtain, Royal Swedish Opera, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN, 2008

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