Category: Photography

Glow: A Dancer Filmed in Front of a Glow-In-The-Dark Backdrop 

Toronto-based filmmaker Jonah Haber recently premiered a new experimental short film titled Glow featuring dancer Niamh Wilson shot against a giant glow-in-the-dark backdrop. As Wilson moves through the piece a strobe illuminates her silhouette leaving a trail of shadowy figures against the background. What a fun idea. The film serves as the official video for Yes We Mystic’s track “Working For The Future In The Interlake“. If you liked this also check out Michael Langan and Terah Maher’s art film Choros.

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A Look Inside Europe’s Most Enchanting Libraries by Photographer Thibaud Poirier 

Trinity College Library, Dublin, 1732

Over the last year, photographer Thibaud Poirier has traveled across Europe to photograph some of the world’s most incredible libraries. The series includes both historic and contemporary libraries with a special emphasis on the varied designs employed by architects. Poirier captured each image when the buildings were closed and empty of people to focus entirely on structure and layout. From his statement about the project:

Like fingerprints, each architect crafted his vision for a new space for this sacred self-exploration. These seemingly minute details are everywhere, from the balance of natural and artificial light to optimise reading yet preserve ancient texts to the selective use of studying tables to either foster community or encourage lonely reflection. The selection of these libraries that span space, time, style and cultures were carefully selected for each one’s unique ambiance and architectural contribution.

So far Poirier has photographed 25 libraries and says he intends to add to the series as time permits. If you liked this, also check out his Berlin Interiors series.

Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Paris, 1850

Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Salle Labrouste, Paris, 1868

Bibliothèque de l’Hotel de Ville de Paris, Paris, 1890

Grimm Zentrum Library, Berlin, 2009

Stadtbibliothek, Stuttgart, 2011

Bibliothèque de la Sorbonne, Salle Jacqueline de Romilly, Paris, 1897

Biblioteca Joanina, Coimbra, 1728

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Three-Dimensional Landscapes Formed with Layered Acrylic Photographs by Nobuhiro Nakanishi 

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

Japanese artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi creates sculptural works that attempt to preserve a singular moment in the natural world, capturing deeply pigmented sunsets and brightly-lit forests in a series he’s titled Layer Drawings. To produce the three-dimensional installations, Nakanishi first photographs an environment over a period of time. He then mounts selected images from his documentation on panels of acrylic in chronological order, allowing slight variation from frame to frame.

“We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way,” says Nakaniski, “Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.”

Nakaniski is represented by Yukimo Chiba Associates in Tokyo. You can see more of his layered works on his website. (via Tu Recepcja)

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan
 (2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

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Brunch Reimagined in the Style of Five Iconic Artists 

Artisan Brunch series. Image inspired by Alexander Calder. (All images via Kyle Bean)

For issue 24 of Kinfolk magazine, Designer Kyle Bean collaborated with photographer Aaron Tilley and food stylist Lucy-Ruth Hathaway to depict how famous artists might reimagine their weekend brunch spreads. The five sculptural works in the series Artisan Brunch balance pancakes and their toppings in a Alexander Calder-like mobile, suspend a halved avocado in what appears to be a Damien Hirst formaldehyde cube, and dot a patchwork of bread slices with ketchup in the style of Yayoi Kusama. The photographic series also references the artistic styles of Cornelia Parker and Salvador Dali with a flavorful twist. You can see more inventive work by the series’ collaborators on their Instagrams @kylejbean, @aaron_tilley, and @lucyruthfood, and check out a previous collaboration between Bean and Tilley in their series Anxious Anticipation.

Image inspired by Salvador Dali

Image inspired by Damien Hirst

Image inspired by Cornelia Parker

Image inspired by Yayoi Kusama

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Fractal: A Magnificent Supercell Thunderstorm Timelapse by Chad Cowan 

For the last decade, Kansas-based photographer Chad Cowan has driven almost 100,000 miles across the United States chasing powerful supercell thunderstorms and recording them in high definition. The endeavor began as a personal project to capture a few storms as they developed but quickly grew into a full-blown obsession. Cowan has recorded hundreds of storms and condensed the highlights into this short film titled Fractal with editing help from Kevin X Barth. He shares about the nature of thunderstorms:

The ingredient based explanation for supercell thunderstorms cites moisture, wind shear, instability and lift as the reasons for their formation. I prefer to focus on the big picture. Supercell thunderstorms are a manifestation of nature’s attempt to correct an extreme imbalance. The ever ongoing effort to reach equilibrium, or viscosity, is what drives all of our weather, and the force with which the atmosphere tries to correct this imbalance is proportional to the gradient. In other words, the more extreme the imbalance, the more extreme the storm.

You can see more of Cowan’s storm photography on his website and on Instagram. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Giants: A Black and White Series Captures the Complexity of the Humpback Whale 

Over the last three years photographer Jem Cresswell has photographed humpback whales during their annual migration to Vava’u, Tonga, swimming with the great creatures in the vast waters of the southern Pacific Ocean. Cresswell’s series Giants captures the individual personality of the great whales, each of which seem to pose specifically for his underwater camera.

“I was initially drawn to the whales’ gentle nature, sheer size and the feeling of insignificance in their presence,” said Cresswell. “Over the past 3 years returning to Tonga, I have sought to capture intimate portraits of these complex and conscious animals, bringing the viewer into the world of these mystical giants.”

In addition to being intrigued by the animals’ size, the Australian-based artist is also fascinated by their brains. In 2006, spindle cells, which were only thought to be present in humans and great apes, were also found to exist within the brains of humpback whales. These cells, which are tied to social organization, empathy, and intuition, were found to be more than three times as prevalent in humpback whales than they were in humans.

This sense of humanness is one of the reasons that Cresswell chooses to shoot his underwater subjects in black and white. “The main focus of the project concerns the whale’s sense of character and consciousness,” he explained to Colossal. “To me, black and white avoids distraction and draws the viewer directly to the subject. Black and white also has a sense of timelessness to it, which I feel represents how long these creatures have been around for.”

Cresswell will continue photographing humpback whales in the future, but at the present he is taking a break to work on a new series focused on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. You can get a behind-the-scenes perspective of Cresswell’s underwater shoots on his Instagram and in the short video below. (via My Modern Met)

 

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