Category: Photography

Candid Moments with Forest Creatures Photographed by Konsta Punkka 


Crawling on the ground for hours at a time in the middle of winter at the mouth of a cave doesn’t sound like a particularly fun time, but for Finland-based photographer Konsta Punkka it’s a necessary sacrifice to get the perfect photograph … of a mouse. At the age of only 21, the budding wildlife photographer has proven himself wildly capable of capturing affectionate portraits at extremely close quarters of squirrels, birds, foxes, and other woodland animals.

“My main goal always is to try to capture the emotions and feelings my animals feel while I take the photos of them,” he shares with Colossal. “The animals health always comes first and then I get the shots if I can. All animal portraits that I have taken have been done with trust between me and animals. And with patience you earn the trust.”

Punkka has amassed a sizeable following on Instagram where he shares photographs from his travels around the world.










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Masked Figures Found in Macro Insect Photography by Pascal Goet 


Using subtle changes in light and shadow, French photographer Pascal Goet subtly manipulates the details of a variety of insects, highlighting their anthropomorphic appearance. Goet does not alter any of the colors associated with the brilliantly hued bugs, but instead focuses on letting areas of the body fade away or become more pronounced. Through this process faces emerge, a human reflection in an otherwise unrelatable species. This aspect is especially pronounced when printed quite large for exhibitions, where the audience has their own face come into contact with an imitation of one.

“An authenticity is vital for my involvement in this work,” said Goet to Colossal. “The large size prints create a genuine encounter between the viewer and these amazing personages, people of a parallel world.”

Goet has been shooting macro photography for the past 26 years. He had a solo exhibition of this work earlier this year at Paris-based Blin Plus Blin simply titled “Mask.” You can see more images of this series on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)








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Boiling Point by Paul Octavious 


Photographer Paul Octavious captured the above image using a drone in his Chicago neighborhood, editing the image with red marks in post production as a reaction to the hostile environment escalating both in the city and across the country. By using a drone to photograph the thermometer-like image Octavious was also able to capture the landscape surrounding his street intervention, adding a deeper context to his work by providing a glimpse of Chicago’s own streets.

“While photographing a street in my neighborhood from above, I immediately picked out the shape which resembled that of a classic glass thermometer,” said Octavious. “As I painted over the asphalt with red in post, it started to take on something more to me. With everything that’s going on right now in this country, and the violence happening on our streets, the boiling point is at an all-time high. I think while creating this, I had a few things on my mind.”

You can see more of Octavious’ work on his Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Magical Photographs of Fireflies from Japan’s 2016 Summer 


Photo by Yu Hashimoto.

Each year when summer comes along, we all look forward to different things. Some of us head to the beach, others to the mountains for camping. Some look forward to the epicurean delights like watermelon and ice cones. But for a select group of photographers in Japan, Summer signals the arrival of fireflies. And for very short periods – typically May and June, from around 7 to 9pm – these photographers set off to secret locations all around Japan, hoping to capture the magical insects that light up the night.

One thing that makes these photographs so magical is that they capture views that the naked eye is simply incapable of seeing. The photographs are typically composites, meaning that they combine anywhere from 10 to 200 of the exact same frame. That’s why it can look like swarms of thousands of fireflies have invaded the forest, when in reality it’s much less. But that’s not to discount these photographs, which require insider knowledge, equipment, skill and patience.

Fireflies live for only about 10 days and they’re extremely sensitive. They react negatively to any form of light and pollution, making finding them half the battle. Here, we present to you some a selection of our favorites from the 2016 summer season. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)


Photo by fumial.


Photo by Yasushi Kikuchi.


Photo by soranopa.


Photo by miyu.


Photo by hm777.


Photo by hm777.

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Pilot Captures Amazing Thunderstorm Photo at 37,000 Feet Over the Pacific Ocean 


Photo © Santiago Borja, used with permission.

Over the last few years we’ve seen our fair share of storm and lightning photographs, but this shot from Ecuador Airlines pilot Santiago Borja might top them all. Taken from a Boeing 767-300 cockpit at the precise moment of a lightning flash, the image captures a powerful thunderstorm forming above the Pacific Ocean just south of Panama. A difficult shot considering the turbulent weather and near pitch-dark setting.

“I like this photo so much because you can feel the amazing size of the storm and its power,” he tells the Washington Post. “But at the same time it’s wonderful how peacefully you can fly around it in still air without touching it.”

Borja also shared a second thunderstorm photo with Colossal taken in October of last year along the coast of Venezuela. You can see more of his travel and storm photos on Instagram.


Photo © Santiago Borja, used with permission.

Update: Photographer Kevin O’ Mara shares his own aerial thunderstorm photo taken over Alabama in 2013.

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