installation

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Art

Melting Memories: A Data-Driven Installation that Shows the Brain’s Inner Workings

April 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Media artist Refik Anadol’s work Melting Memories combines data paintings, light projections, and augmented data sculptures to visibly demonstrate how the brain recalls memories. The installation was created with a custom 16 x 20 foot LED media wall and CNC milled rigid foam, and was shown earlier in 2018 at Pilevneli Gallery in Istanbul. In the work, seething swirls move across the work’s surface, resembling cresting ocean waves, blossoming flowers, and shifting sand.

To generate the data, Anadol conducted experiments at the Neuroscape Laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco. An artist statement describes the technical process: “Anadol gathers data on the neural mechanisms of cognitive control from an EEG (electroencephalogram) that measures changes in brain wave activity and provides evidence of how the brain functions over time. These data sets constitute the building blocks for the unique algorithms that the artist needs for the multi-dimensional visual structures on display.”

Anadol is a media artist and director who specializes in site-specific public art that explores the intersection of physical and digital reality. Born in Istanbul, the artist is now based in Los Angeles, where he is a visiting researcher and lecturer at UCLA’s Department of Design Media Arts. You can see more of his work on his website, as well as on Instagram, Vimeo, and Behance.

 

 



Art

‘Future Flowers’ Blossom in a Digital Collaboration Presented at Japan’s Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine

April 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For the Hanami 2050 exhibition in Fukuoka, Japan, Danish floral designer Nicolai Bergmann collaborated with the Tokyo-based design firm Onesal to create a series of dazzling botanical animations. The works were created under the concept of “future flowers,” and explore creations from deep within the designers’ imaginations. Fantastical and brightly colored buds burst into bloom with a satisfying crack and sizzle, presenting arrangements that appear like a cross between a botanical garden and extraterrestrial forest.

The looping presentations were displayed on screens embedded in real foliage arranged by Bergmann, and sprung to life at the historic Shinto shrine Dazaifu Tenmangu (太宰府天満宮) from March 29 to April 1, 2018. You can see a video, and several clips, from the recent installation below.

 

 

 



Art Design

Light Leaks: A Shimmering Room Filled with Fifty Disco Balls and Hundreds of Reflected Points of Light

April 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Installation at The Music Center LA

Kyle McDonald and Jonas Jongejan filled a darkened room with fifty disco balls and created colored and timed lighting sequences to cast mesmerizing reflections that surround visitors. However, rather than simply relying on scattershot reflections, McDonald and Jongejan used hundreds of structured light scans to capture the volumetric position of every pixel being projected by each of the three projectors. The pair then used SketchUp to predict the reflected pixel positions.

The designers describe Light Leaks as “a curious space that alternates between a meditative state, and an uneasy imbalance. An experiment in combining a found object with computer vision to create a profound and unusual experience.” It has since been installed at La Gaîté Lyrique (Paris, 2014) and Scopitone Festival (Nantes, 2015), and most recently at The Music Center LA (2018).

Based in Los Angeles, McDonald is an artist working with code. He has been an adjunct professor at NYU and an artist in residence at Carnegie Mellon. You can find more of his recent projects on his website and Twitter. Jongejan lives and works in New York City, where he is a creative technologist at Google Creative Lab, and previously worked in theater and television building interactive sets. He shares his work on his website and Twitter. Light Leaks was produced by Juliette Bibasse.

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installing “Light Leaks” at La Gaîté Lyrique for the Capitaine Futur show, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at The Music Center LA

 

 



Art

A Live Plant Grows Through Walls in Ruben Bellinkx’s Site-Specific Installation

April 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad is a repeating site-specific installation by Belgium-based artist Ruben Bellinkx that physically imbeds a common houseplant into the walls of galleries and homes. The plant calmly rests on one side of the wall as several of its leaves reach through layers of dry wall and wooden beams to grow on the other side.

“The plant literally grows through the wall,” Bellinkx told Colossal. “I make a hole in the wall and place the plant so that there are enough leaves on the other side. Then I close everything with wooden panels. When there is enough light on the other side, the place grows further and lasts for a maximum of four months.”

The artist is a guest professors at KASK, the University College in Ghent, Belgium in the department of Fine Arts (Drawing), and lives in Brussels. His work is currently included in the group exhibition The Raft. Art is (not) Lonely, curated by Jan Fabre and Joanna De Vos at Mu.ZEE in Ostend, Belgium through April 15. You can view documentation of the installation process for Philodendron Xanad below, and see more of Bellinkx’s temporary installations and photography on his website.

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7x11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

Philodendron Xanad II / Site specific installation in exhibition ‘7×11’ / 2008 / Heden, Den Hague (NL), Courtesy Ruben Bellinkx / Geukens & De Vil

 

 

 



Art Craft

Stitched Sculptural Installations of Everyday Objects and Gestures by Amanda McCavour

March 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Toronto-based textile artist Amanda McCavour uses thread and a sewing machine to construct sculptural installations that dance between two and three dimensions. McCavour stitches on a special fabric that dissolves in water to create the surfaces of thread. Through renderings of objects like sofas, kitchen tables, and backpacks, as well as arms and hands engaged in work, she explores connections to home and the fibers of the body. In an artist statement McCavor states she is interested “in thread’s assumed vulnerability, its ability to unravel, and its strength when it is sewn together.”

McCavour holds an MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, and she exhibits widely. Currently, her Floating Garden installation is on display at the Cornell Art Museum in Florida as part of their Flora exhibition, which opens today, March 30th, and is on view through September 9, 2018. Flora also includes Tiffanie Turner (previously), and Miya Ando (previously). You can see more of McCavour’s work on her Facebook page and via Instagram.

 

 



Art

Lifelike Sculpted Figures and Immersive Monochrome Environments by Hans Op de Beeck

March 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck creates life-size figural sculptures and immersive environments from materials such as coated wood, polyester, and pigmented plaster. These chosen materials turn his constructed figures and installations into a uniform shade of matte gray, which makes the viewer feel as if the world around them has been zapped of color.

In his 2016 work The Collector’s House, Op de Beeck produced a 2,600-square-foot monochrome space in which visitors served as the only element of color. The museum-like installation contained several life-size sculpted figures in addition to a library, grand piano, furniture, scattered still lifes, and a lily pool positioned squarely at the work’s center. This work, like many in his practice aimed to stimulate the viewer’s senses and to “create a form of visual fiction that delivers a moment of wonder, silence and introspection,” he explained in an artist statement.

Op de Beeck currently works in both Brussels and Gooik, Belgium. Over the last decade, Op de Beeck has mounted institution-based solo exhibitions at museums across the US and Europe, including the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (2010), MOCA Cleveland (2014), and Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2017). You can view more of his lifelike figures and installations on his website.

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

Tatiana (Soap Bubble), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Tatiana (Soap Bubble), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Sleeping Girl, sculpture, 2017. Mixed Media

Sleeping Girl, sculpture, 2017. Mixed Media

Brian, sculpture, 2018. Polyester, glass, coating

Brian, sculpture, 2018. Polyester, glass, coating

Tatiana (Butterfly), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Tatiana (Butterfly), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

The Garden Room, sculptural installation, 2017

The Garden Room, sculptural installation, 2017

 

 



Art

Oversized Crocheted Doilies by Ashley V Blalock Climb Up Trees and Gallery Walls

March 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Ashley V Blalock crochets enormous red doilies that she then installs in site-specific configurations ranging from galleries to stairwells to trees outside. Her ongoing project, Keeping Up Appearances, began in 2011 and has been installed at museums, galleries, and gardens across the United States.

The artist describes the meaning behind Keeping Up Appearances: “Although non-threatening in a domestic setting, in the gallery and at this scale the [doilies] overtake the viewer and cover the walls… Inherent is a compulsion to arrange and place and decorate in order to control or influence a perceived outward appearance. The red color gives away the futility of such an act and hints at the unease that lurks below the surface of an obsessive need to control and arrange.”

Blalock is based in Southern California. She received a bachelor’s and two master’s degrees in sculpture and art history. You can see more of her installation work on her website.