Tag Archives: landscapes

Wind-Swept Frost Blankets Tree Trunks in a Czech Forest

Wind Swept Frost Blankets Tree Trunks in a Czech Forest winter trees landscapes frost Czech Republic

Photographer Jan Bainar was hiking through the Beskydy Mountains last week, a range that forms the border between Slovakia and the Czech Republic, when he stumbled onto something spectacular. Low temperatures, high winds, and a bit of precipitation caused frost to form on one side of the tree trunks through the entire forest. Any meteorologists want to chime in on this? Is this the same thing as hoar frost or frost flowers? Something different? You can see more of Bainar’s landscape photography over on 500px. Photo courtesy the photographer.

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Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Foggy European Landscapes at Sunrise Photographed by Kilian Schönberger mountains landscapes fog Europe

Photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) stays up all night, often driving 3-4 hours in the dark to hike up mountains in Germany, the Czech Republic, Austria and France, to shoot these foggy landscapes just before sunrise. Only at heights of 500 to 1,500 meters can he achieve a clear view of rolling mountains and treetops as they pierce through the fog for a few brief minutes. He shares via email:

Since I’m ascending the mountains during the early morning hours mostly alone it’s always a very special experience. When it’s still dark during the walk everything is calm except some animals of the night like owls. The anticipation is growing when the eastern sky starts to gloom gently. Around 30 minutes before sunrise the best stage of such a morning starts. The intensity of colors reaches the peak and due to the indirect lighting everything seems to be smooth. These are the moments that touch one’s soul in a very meditative way.

You can see much more of Schönberger’s work over on his Facebook page. (via My Modern Met)

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Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost San Francisco salt landscapes color aerial

While flying south of San Francisco recently, photographer Julieanne Kost managed to capture this beautiful series of photographs that look like something out of a Dr. Seuss book. The color in the photos isn’t altered, nor were the images taken with an infrared lens, instead what you’re seeing are countless trillions of microorganisms thriving away inside shallow salt ponds. It takes an average of five years to transform bay water into salt brine, during which the various organisms that live in the ponds undergo a dramatic chromatic shift as the salinity increases. You can a bit more about the process over on Amusing Planet, and see more of Kost’s photograhs on Behance. All photos courtesy the photographer. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics
From the series Landscape Multiple, 2013. Reworked second hand ceramics. Dimensions 52 x 42 x 7 cm. Collection Röhsska Museum, Gothenburg (S)

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics
From the series Landscape Multiple, 2007. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 26 cm

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics
From the series Landscape Multiple, 2012. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 26 cm

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics
From the series Landscape Multiple, 2009. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 33 cm

Landscapes Sculpted into Layered Antique Dinner Plates by Caroline Slotte sculpture landscapes ceramics

Helsinki-based artist Caroline Slotte manipulates artwork found on acquired antique ceramics to create layered landscapes and isolated images. One of her most striking bodies of work titled Landscape Multiple involves a process of carving and sanding through stacked dinner plates to create new, unexpected landscapes. From her artist statement:

The reworking of second hand objects play a pivotal role in Caroline Slotte´s practice. She manipulates found materials, primarily ceramic everyday items, so that they take on new meanings. The tensions between the recognizable and the enigmatic, the ordinary and the unexpected are recurring thematic concerns. More recent explorations reveal an expanded interest in material perception and material recognition, teasing out situations where the initial visual identification fails resulting in an unsettling state of material confusion. Demonstrating an engaged sensitivity towards the associations, memories and narratives inherent in the objects, Slotte´s intricate physical interventions allows us to see things we would otherwise not have seen.

What you see here is just a sample of Slotte’s work, head over to her website to see all of these pieces close up, and also check out her wood sculptures. Slotte had several additional pieces on view earlier this year at Kunstnerforbundet Gallery in Oslo. (via Yellowtrace)

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Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

Breathtaking Aerial Landscapes of Iceland by Sarah Martinet landscapes Iceland aerial

While on a recent trip to Iceland, photographer Sarah Martinet had the opportunity to shoot these amazing landscapes from a plane with open windows. You can see much more of her work (as well as more from this trip) on 500px and Facebook.

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Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Water on the moon, Reykjanes Peninsula

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Hvitserkur Rock

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Gullfoss at dusk

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Turquoise Falls, Bruarfoss

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Black Falls, Skaftafell

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Blue Storm, Jokulsarlon

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Blue Ice, Jokulsarlon

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
The mighty Dettifoss

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Sacred Water, Godafoss

Stunning Views of Iceland Captured by Jerome Berbigier landscapes Iceland
Svartifoss, infrared processing

Photographer Jérôme Berbigier moved from France to Australia in 2007 and soon after took up photography. Inspired by a childhood spent near the Atlantic Ocean and the natural beauty of areas surrounding Sydney, it wasn’t long before he was capturing stunning landscapes up and down the Australian coast. A 2012 trip took him to Iceland where he captured these amazing views of the country’s waterfalls, rivers, and seascapes, some of which he didn’t publish until just this year. You can see much more of his photography on Flickr and over on Facebook. Prints of all his work are available upon request. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#45 (Bulau)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 24 x 29 1/8 inches (all photographs courtesy the artist and RH Contemporary Art)

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#41 (Rotterbach und Hacksiefen)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#1 (Stolpe-Süd)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 24 x 29 1/8 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#54 (Altwarmbüchener Moor)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#58 (Projensdorfer Gehölz)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#66 (Mascheroder Holz)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#79 (Münsterbusch)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#83 (Beerenbruch)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Although WWII ended almost 70 years ago, its legacy lives on: in photographs, memories and on our landscape. Walk through the forests of Germany and you’ll see craters or, scars, as German photographer Henning Rogge calls them, that are the aftermath of bombs being dropped from planes. Rogge has been tracking down these craters and photographing them, capturing moments, after decades have elapsed, of earth slowly healing her wounds. An unknowing hiker might easily mistake them for small ponds and nothing more, which is perhaps why these masked scars are so haunting. Rogge’s photographs are part of a group show titled The Beautiful Changes, which is on display at RH Contemporary Art in New York City through September 13, 2014. (via Hyperallergic)

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