Tag Archives: nature

Hyperrealistic Depictions of a Fictional Mouse-Butterfly Species by Lisa Ericson

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x14″

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x 14″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x12″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x 12″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

"Gatherer I", Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer I”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x16″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x 16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x 16″

Lisa Ericson‘s logo is just as enchanting as her hyperrealistic paintings, a tiny mouse with butterfly wings floating between her first and last name. Ericson works as a multi-hyphenate, utilizing her visual talents as an artist, illustrator, and designer to craft meaningful images for both her client and personal practice.

In her newest series Ericson skillfully depicts her invented species of mouse-butterfly while they explore environments filled with detailed mushrooms, forgotten tin jars, and forest brush while sometimes clutching found objects such as acorns and raspberries.

Ericson’s first exhibition, and one featuring this series, is displayed at Portland’s Antler Gallery alongside Heiko Müller and John Casey until April, 27th. During my research I also learned that Ericson illustrated Ramona Ausubel’s website (one of my favorite contemporary authors), and can be seen here. (via This Isn’t Happiness, Hi-Fructose)

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Two Vividly-Marked Peacock Spider Species Nicknamed “Sparklemuffin” and “Skeletorus” Discovered in Queensland

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

Two new species of peacock spiders have been discovered in southeast Queensland, Australia—one appearing with vivid reds and blues while the other’s details exist in stark black and white. Peacock spiders, named after their bright patterns and dancelike courtship, measure in at just under 0.3 inches. Madeline Girard, a graduate student at UC Berkeley, discovered the two species while in the field, nicknaming the brightly colored spider “Sparklemuffin” and the other “Skeletorus” after its bonelike pattern.

Jürgen Otto, an entomologist who specializes in photographing the arachnids said Skeletorus, officially named Maratus sceletus, is completely different than any peacock spider previously discovered. “Despite the large number of species we have discovered just in the last few years, I can’t help feeling that we may have just scratched the surface of this most exciting group of spiders, and that nature has quite a few more surprises in store,” Otto told Live Science. You can read more in depth about these colorful arachnids in Live Science’s article here. (via My Modern Met)

Detailed Colored Pencil Drawings of Flora and Fauna by Marco Mazzoni

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For most of us, a sketchbook is a playground of ideas, random thoughts, and plenty of mistakes. For Milan-based artist Marco Mazzoni it’s a place where new artworks are born, realized to perfection from margin to margin. In his colored pencil drawings Mazzoni tends to focus on dense arrays of intertwined flora and fauna, as well as depictions of female herbalists from 16th—18th Century, Sardinia—portraits that can be viewed as equally beautiful or unsettling.

Seen here are a number of drawings for the past few months, some of which were created for Juxtapoz Magazine’s 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery through April 19th. You can follow his work on Instagram, Facebook, and on Tumblr.

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An Extraordinary Macro Timelapse of Aquatic Wildlife by Sandro Bocci

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The above clip is a trailer of sorts for an upcoming non-verbal film titled Prograve by Italian filmmaker and documentarist Sandro Bocci. The feature is billed as (translated from Italian) “an experimental film orbiting scientific and philosophical reflections on time and space, and that through various shooting techniques, fields of magnification, and an exciting soundtrack, weaves a web between science and magic.” The section shown here depicts beautiful macro timelapses of coral, sponges and other aquatic wildlife filmed under ultraviolet light. You can see additional stills from the upcoming film here. Music by Maurizio Morganti. (via Vimeo Staff Picks, Coudal)

Macro Photographs of Singapore’s Most Unusual Insects and Arachnids by Nicky Bay

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Cicadae Parasite Beetle (Rhipiceridae)

One of my favorite Flickr accounts to follow is Singapore-based photographer Nicky Bay (previously) who ventures into some of the most ecologically diverse (ie. creepiest and crawliest) places in the world to shoot macro photos of insects, arachnids, and fungi. Bay went on 46 different shooting excursions in 2014 and discovered creatures that seem more at home in an Avatar movie than here on Earth. He’s also begun working more with ultraviolet light that he uses to reveal the natural fluorescence of many organisms he encounters. My favorite discovery while scrolling through Bay’s 2014 photos is this species of moth that builds a cage out of its own caterpillar spines to protect itself while in a pupal stage. You can follow his day-to-day adventures on Facebook.

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Archduke larva (Lexias pardalis dirteana)

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Caterpillar

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Freshly moulted Jumping Spider

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Harvestman illuminated with 365nm wavelength ultraviolet light; Millipede fluorescence.

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Treehopper (Membracidae)

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Cuckoo Bee

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Caged pupa. The spines of the caterpillar were used to construct this magnificent cage for protection during pupation.

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Bioluminescent fungi

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Longhorn beetle

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Huntsman Spider consuming prey exposed under ultraviolet light for 20 seconds.

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Twig Spider

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Drunk in Autumn: A Towering New Acrylic Ink Drawing by Zhao Na

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Drunk in Autumn is the latest work from Chinese artist and illustrator Zhao Na who works primarily with acrylic pens on large canvases to create spectacular tableaus of wildlife. Every detail is achieved with line work and crosshatching, a tremendous feat considering the scale. This particular piece measures about 60″ x 31″ and is a companion of sorts to a similar drawing from two years ago titled Calm. If you liked this and are new to Na’s work, you’re in luck, there’s much more to see here.

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Intricacies: A Book of Collaborative Drawings Inspired by Nature

Christina Mrozik Zoe Keller Intricacies 10 Herons

Christina Mrozik Zoe Keller Intricacies 2 Snail

Christina Mrozik Zoe Keller Intricacies 4 Kingfisher Girl

Christina Mrozik Zoe Keller Intricacies 7 Barnacle Girl

Christina Mrozik Zoe Keller Intricacies 9 Root and Marrow

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Christina Mrozik Zoe Keller Intricacies 12 Geode

Intricacies is a forthcoming book of collaborative illustrations between artists Christina Mrozik and Zoe Keller. The black and white drawings of birds, intertwined anatomical studies, and other bits of wildlife stitched with hints of narrative were inspired in part by the rural landscape surrounding their small art studio in Michigan. Each illustration represents 30-50 hours of combined drawing time, with some pieces passed back and forth multiple times between Keller and Mrozik before the piece was finished. The 64-page hardcover book is currently funding over on Kickstarter with just 3 days left. (via Juxtapoz)

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