Tag Archives: nature

Photographs of Antarctica’s Blue Ice at Eye Level by Julieanne Kost 

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On a recent trip to Antarctica, photographer Julieanne Kost (previously) spent several days weaving in-between icebergs around Black Head, Cuverville Island, and Pleneau Bay, spending her time aboard a zodiac boat in order to experience the beauty of the continent’s blue ice at eye level. Her images showcase the deep gradations of blue peeking out from within the icebergs, wavy impressions in the outer layers revealing dark blue centers.

You can see more of Kost’s photography, including many aerial shots of naturally vibrant landscapes, on her Instagram and Facebook.

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Candid Moments with Forest Creatures Photographed by Konsta Punkka 

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Crawling on the ground for hours at a time in the middle of winter at the mouth of a cave doesn’t sound like a particularly fun time, but for Finland-based photographer Konsta Punkka it’s a necessary sacrifice to get the perfect photograph … of a mouse. At the age of only 21, the budding wildlife photographer has proven himself wildly capable of capturing affectionate portraits at extremely close quarters of squirrels, birds, foxes, and other woodland animals.

“My main goal always is to try to capture the emotions and feelings my animals feel while I take the photos of them,” he shares with Colossal. “The animals health always comes first and then I get the shots if I can. All animal portraits that I have taken have been done with trust between me and animals. And with patience you earn the trust.”

Punkka has amassed a sizeable following on Instagram where he shares photographs from his travels around the world.

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New Paintings of Birds Set Against Colorful Glitches by Frank Gonzales 

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“Cactus Wren and Nopalito” (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″ x 12″, all images via Frank Gonzales

Set behind abstract drips and multi-colored streaks are the realistic works of Frank Gonzales (previously), bright acrylic paintings that capture birds in moments of rest on top of tree branches, flowers, or prickly cacti. The additional marks bring colors that are often not found in nature, pairing them with birds that have subdued feathers shades like owls or larks.

Gonzales sources his visual information from reference books and images he finds on the internet, pulling them together to create compositions that might never occur in nature. “One image will spark another and the process takes shape from there,” says Gonzales on his website. “I find this way of working to be both exciting and uncertain. My various marks and color glitches mimic this uncertainty resulting in visual stillness and movement.”

You can see more of Gonzales’ mixed flora and fauna paintings, as well as take a look into work in progress, on his Instagram.

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“Azure-Winged Magpie & Totem” (2016), acrylic on panel, 16″ x 20″

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“Speciman” (2015), acrylic on panel, 20″ x 24″

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“Double Horned Larks” (2016), acrylic on panel, 12″ x 12″

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“Sacred Source” (2015), acrylic on panel, 8″ x 8″

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“Magpies and Mother in Law’s” (2015), acrylic on panel, 16″ x 20″

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“Buff Bellied Hummingbird and Hellebore” (2015), acrylic on panel, 12″ x 12″

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“Mirando al Futuro” (2015), acrylic on panel, 36″ x 36″

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Intricate Moss Assemblages Sprout From Embroidery Hoops 

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Utilizing felt, thread, and the french knot, artist Emma Mattson stitches moss-like configurations onto embroidery hoops, latching the materials onto the base like the flowerless plants which she mimics. In addition to simulating the look of the greenery, Mattson also likes to add a few pieces of fake moss on top of her works to walk the line between imitation and reality. You can see more of her moss-based embroideries on her Instagram, and find pieces for sale on her Etsy. (via Illusion)

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Magical Photographs of Fireflies from Japan’s 2016 Summer 

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Photo by Yu Hashimoto.

Each year when summer comes along, we all look forward to different things. Some of us head to the beach, others to the mountains for camping. Some look forward to the epicurean delights like watermelon and ice cones. But for a select group of photographers in Japan, Summer signals the arrival of fireflies. And for very short periods – typically May and June, from around 7 to 9pm – these photographers set off to secret locations all around Japan, hoping to capture the magical insects that light up the night.

One thing that makes these photographs so magical is that they capture views that the naked eye is simply incapable of seeing. The photographs are typically composites, meaning that they combine anywhere from 10 to 200 of the exact same frame. That’s why it can look like swarms of thousands of fireflies have invaded the forest, when in reality it’s much less. But that’s not to discount these photographs, which require insider knowledge, equipment, skill and patience.

Fireflies live for only about 10 days and they’re extremely sensitive. They react negatively to any form of light and pollution, making finding them half the battle. Here, we present to you some a selection of our favorites from the 2016 summer season. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Photo by fumial.

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Photo by Yasushi Kikuchi.

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Photo by soranopa.

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Photo by miyu.

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Photo by hm777.

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Photo by hm777.

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New Swirling Psychedelic Illustrations by James R. Eads 

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Exploring ideas of human connection and our relationships to nature, illustrator James R. Eads (previously) paints multicolored, psychadelic scenes that seem to pulsate with swirling patterns. Eads says his work is heavily inspired by music, and indeed the LA-based illustrator is constantly cranking out gig posters for the likes of the Foo Fighters, Dave Matthews Band, and Iggy Pop. Seen here is mostly a collection of person work from the last year, some of which are available as art prints. You can also follow him on Instagram.

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