paper

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Craft

Elaborate Paper Origami Tessellations and Kusudamas by Ekaterina Lukasheva

February 21, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva first tried folding paper at the age of 14 when a mathematics professor brought in a book on kusudamas. The traditional paper sphere technique requires an understanding of geometry to ensure the individual units fit together perfectly with the help of glue or string. A few years later she began to explore much more complicated designs like tessellations, aided by a university degree in mathematics and programming. Through her experimentation and commitment Lukasheva has become so proficient with paper that she’s authored several DIY books featuring some of her original designs. You can follow more of her work on Flickr and Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art

Haut-Relief Portraits of Animals Come Alive in Detailed Paper Sculptures by Calvin Nicholls

January 29, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Canadian paper artist Calvin Nicholls (previously) continues to build striking likenesses of wildlife, featuring birds, bears, and foxes rendered in haut-relief sculpture. Despite working in monochromatic palettes of white and off-white paper, he imbues the animal portraits with a sense of liveliness and realism. Innumerable slivers of paper create lifelike feathers and fur, and each creature is shown in a naturalistic pose—snuggled down for a rest, or wings stretched in flight.

Nicholls accepts commercial commissions and some of the works shown below are from a holiday window display for the jeweler David Yurman. You can see a video of the process and installation here, and find more of the artist’s works on his website and Facebook page.

Work in progress

Work in progress

Work in progress

 

 



Art

A Relaxing Video Demonstrates the Detailed Steps of Making Paper by Hand

January 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Chinese vlogger Li Ziqi films her videos in the serene countryside of China, demonstrating step-by-step instructions for making traditional recipes such as fresh pomelo honey and Lanzhou beef noodles. In one of her most recent videos Li presents the days long process of traditional Chinese paper making, a process which can be traced back to the early years of the Han Dynasty sometime within the 2nd century BC.

The soothing video weaves together the necessary steps for making paper from scratch. During the video Li strictly adheres to the ancient process, using only basic tools such as fire and a mortar and pestle to transform the raw bark. After cutting down a few trees for the paper, Li then cuts and mashes the trunks into pulp, solidifying the consistency of the solution through several rounds of soaking and drying. You can watch the entirety of the demonstration above (along with a surprising twist ending), and view more of Li’s relaxing instructionals on her Youtube channel. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Design Science

Papier Machine: A Book of Six Interactive Electronic Paper Toys

January 16, 2018

Christopher Jobson

We’ve seen a wide gamut of paper project books lately, from shadows and cameras to planetariums and architectural models. Joining the DIY library today is Papier Machine, a collection of six interactive electronic paper toys all gathered together within the pages of a book developed by a trio of French designers. The various experiments are silkscreen printed on perforated paper and activated by button cell batteries, conductive silver ink, metal marbles, and other electronic components.

The six included gadgets include a piano “tuned” by hand-drawn graphite zones, a gyroscope, a marble track that plays sounds, a wind sensor, a centrifugal force track, and a tilt switch. Earlier versions of Papier Machine won Audi Talent and Red Dot Design awards, leading way to extra research and development in this final book which just launched on Kickstarter. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 



Design

A Paper Memo Pad That Excavates Objects as It Gets Used

January 15, 2018

Johnny Strategy

Leave it to the stationery-loving Japanese to come up with a new way to enjoy writing notes. The Omoshiroi Block (loosely translated as ‘fun block’) utilizes laser-cutting technology to create what is, at first, just a seemingly normal square cube of paper note cards. But as the note cards get used, an object begins to appear. And you’ll have to exhaust the entire deck of cards to fully excavate the hidden object.

Produced by Japanese company Triad, whose main line of business is producing architectural models, the Omoshiroi Blocks feature various notable architectural sites in Japan like Kyoto’s Kiyomizudera Temple, Tokyo’s Asakusa Temple and Tokyo Tower. The blocks are composed of over 100 sheets of paper and each sheet is different from the next in the same way that individual moments stack up together to form a memory.

But despite the declining cost of laser-cutting technology, the Omoshiroi Blocks are still quite expensive and range from around 4000 yen to 10,000 yen, depending on their size. Getting your hands on one will also be tricky for the time being as they’re currently only available at the Tokyu Hands Osaka location. But you can keep up with updates from the company by following them on Instagram. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

January 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art Craft Food

Japanese Tip: An Exhibition of 8,000 Chopstick Sleeve Sculptures Left Behind at Restaurants

December 19, 2017

Johnny Strategy

Yuki Tatsumi was working as a waiter in a restaurant when one day, as he was cleaning up a table, he noticed that a customer had intricately folded up the paper chopstick sleeve and left it behind. Japan doesn’t have a culture of tipping but Tatsumi imagined that this was a discreet, subconscious method of showing appreciation. He began paying attention and sure enough noticed that other customers were doing the same thing. Tatsumi began collecting these “tips” which eventually led to his art project: Japanese Tip.

Since 2012, Tatsumi has not only been collecting his own tips but he’s reached out to restaurants and eateries all across Japan communicating his concept and asking them to send him their tips. The response has been enormous. He’s collected over 13,000 paper sculptures that range from obscure and ugly to intricate and elaborate.

left at a restaurant in Kochi

Earlier this month, Tatsumi staged an exhibition in Tokyo where he displayed 8,000 of some of the most interesting sculptures sourced from all 47 prefectures around Japan. “Japanese Tip is a project between restaurants and customers,” says Tatsumi, “to communicate the ‘appreciation for food’ and ‘appreciation of the service’ by using the most common material used at any Japanese restaurant.”

The exhibition has since closed but you can see some of the paper sculptures on his website and you can follow the initiative on Facebook. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

left at a cafe in Mie