paper

Posts tagged
with paper



Illustration

New Paper Textured Editorial Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

October 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

With a minimalist approach to editorial work that blends silhouettes and shadows, Estonian illustrator Eiko Ojala has become a staple of major newspapers and magazines as of late including the New York Times, The Washington Post, Wired, and New Scientist. His distinctive style involves the look and feel of paper cut-outs to achieve surprising depth, both visually and conceptually, in clear statements perfect for the limited space of editorial design.
Seen here are a collection of illustrations from the last year or so, but you can see much more on Behance. (via Abduzeedo)

 

 



Amazing Art Craft

Origami Inception: Paper Artist Folds Four Works From a Single Sheet of Paper

October 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Vietnamese paper artist Nguyen Hung Cuong (previously) just unveiled this new origami work titled “Fly High, Dreamers!” that incorporates four sequential objects—a hand holding a crane with a rider also holding a smaller crane—each connected to the other, all from a single uncut sheet of paper. “I created this work to show my deep gratitude to origami community,” Cuong shares. “The boy is myself, and the hand represents all origami creators who inspired me, making my dream come true.” The piece is on view at the Jaffa Museum in Tel Aviv as part of the current Paper Heroes show.

 

 



Design

A New Book Filled With Interactive Paper Pop-up Gadgets by Kelli Anderson

October 10, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Kelli Anderson, a self-described artist/designer and tinkerer has just released her long-awaited book, This Book is a Planetarium. Anderson, who is based in Brooklyn, works in a variety of digital and analog media but is best known for her use of paper in the form of educational apps and animations, as well as interactive toolsThis Book is a Planetarium features several different paper gadgets designed by Anderson, all of which are fully functional.

From the namesake planetarium to a musical instrument, message decoder, and spiralgraph, Anderson also includes readers in the sense of wonderment by offering detailed explanations of how each gadget works. In choosing to compile these tools into a book format, Anderson told Colossal, “Pop-up books are fairly unique among analog experiences in that they engage the reader with both text and experience—and can therefore simultaneously demonstrate and explain a concept. My intention was to create a memorable way to learn foundational physics concepts—especially for artists, children, and people who think with their hands more than they think in numbers.”

As a designer who works with one hand in the digital world and one hand in the tactile world, Anderson described to Colossal a flurry of literal back-and-forth between paper and glue and equations and schematics. Most gadgets started as rough physical prototypes followed by researching mathematical refinements to make them work. In deciding which tools made the cut for the book, the designer created 25 prototypes and evaluated them by the criteria of pop-up-aesthetics, educational value, production feasibility, ease-of-use for the user, and utility. Anderson describes her motivation for the book:

I’m really interested in learning about how the world works through my projects—whether it is the physical world or the world of aesthetic signs and signifiers. The lo-fi devices in the book may be less functional than their digital counterparts, but they reveal structural forces in our world that are otherwise hard to see in isolation. At their fundamental core, digital experiences are always made of rules built by humans. With the book, I hope that I can prove that possibility hides in even the most mundane materials—and that you do not need a specialized education, math genius, or sophisticated equipment to tap into it.

This Book is a Planetarium is available in The Colossal Shop.

 

 



Craft Photography

New Paper Cutouts by ‘Paperboyo’ Turn Landmarks Across the Globe Into Scenes of Temporary Amusement

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

London-based photographer Rich McCor, or paperboyo (previously) travels across the globe giving creative updates to buildings, bridges, and signs through the use of simple paper cutouts. By placing a black design in the foreground of his image, London’s Tower Bridge is instantly transformed into a looping roller coaster, and a Canadian building miraculously appears like a lengthy accordion. Although many of McCor’s pictures engage with architectural elements, the paper artist also makes use of the natural environment as a creative backdrop for his paper works. Recently he published a book based on his cutout journeys, titled Around the World in Cut-Outs. You can see more of his photographic collages on Instagram.

 

 



Craft Design

Miniature Paper Plants by Raya Sader Bujana

October 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paper artist Raya Sader Bujana (previously) has been producing a new series of tiny paper flowers and cacti encased by miniature glass terrariums, each measuring only 4cm high. You can see more on Instagram and a few are available in her Etsy Shop.

 

 



Animation Art Illustration

Transport Cats Across an Animated Countryside With Alexander Perrin’s Interactive Illustration ‘Short Trip’

September 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Short Trip is an interactive illustration by Australian artist Alexander Perrin. The meditative simulation places the player in the conductor’s seat of a cross-country train, allowing the user to use their arrow keys to go forwards or backwards through the game’s peaceful black and white countryside while delivering a series of animated cat passengers.

The illustrated simulation took Perrin five years to complete, from researching how a graphite-based drawing could be presented on a digital platform, to creating all the necessary components of the train’s journey by hand. His interest for this particular scenery came from riding on the Hakone Tozan Railway in Japan, one of his favorite ways of travel.

“It’s a magical, rickety switchback railway that ascends a forest shrouded mountain all throughout the year,” Perrin told Colossal. “There’s something about the beautifully crafted forms of the railway in sculpted union with the cliff faces and trees that just hits such a therapeutic, aesthetic sweet spot. It’s a little bit like riding an enlarged miniature railway, if you know what I mean. You remain passive and enjoy the ride for the sake of the journey.”

The game was built with this passiveness in mind, the only “goal” of the project to get to the other side of the railway while you enjoy the scenery and relaxing soundtrack of gentle bird chirping and cable car as it softly rumbles across the tracks. We recommend make the game full-screen with audio to get the full, tranquil experience of Short Trip.

You can watch a scene from an earlier game prototype by Perrin called Noirmittens in the video below, and see more clips from his current simulator on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Illustration

New Bic Ballpoint Pen Portraits on Vintage Maps and Stationery by Mark Powell

September 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Working atop faded street maps, vintage National Geographic magazine covers, and decades-old stationery, London-based artist Mark Powell (previously) draws the wrinkled contours of his subject’s faces with a standard black Bic ballpoint pen. The weathered portraits of both famous and anonymous people reflect his antiquated canvases both in texture and tone as he traces the topographies of their faces across literal street maps or paper materials that have traversed the world. Powell’s drawings have grown in both scale and detail over the years, magnifying the impact and density of each piece. You can see more of his recent work on his website where he sells a number of prints and quite a few originals. (via This Isn’t Happiness)