Tag Archives: sculpture

An Antique Piano Cut in Half, Connected Only by a Wishbone 

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We’ve long marveled at artist Maskull Lasserre's masterful ability to carve anatomical details into everyday objects. One of his recent sculptures, titled Improbable Worlds, is no exception. For this piece the Canadian artist split an old upright piano in two, slicing through every last component leaving only a single point of connection: a tiny wishbone carved from the wooden piano back. The visual tension created by the piece is astounding, let alone the head-scratching question of how he technically accomplished it, knowing that if the weight of the piano shifted just slightly the piece would snap in half.

You can see more of Lasserre’s recent artworks in his portfolio.

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Shattered Porcelain Fragments Fused With Gold by Artist Yeesookyung 

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches, all images via Locks Gallery

Korean artist Yeesookyung masterfully produces imperfect sculptures, bulbous yet elegant works composed from mismatched porcelain. The series, titled “Translated Vase,” was first inspired by the Korean artisan tradition of destroying porcelain works that are not deemed pristine, and she has continued to make the fused pieces since 2001. Intrigued by these tossed aside works and shards, Yee began saving fragmented tea cups and pots rejected by contemporary masters. Honoring the works’ dismantled states, she traces each crevice in 24-karat gold leaf in the style of Japanese kintsugi, merging the unwanted works together in a way that heightens the beauty of their distress. In this way she blends diverse methods to form a contemporary process that evokes both the elegant designs of her homeland and the delicate rebuilding of damaged works in Japanese tradition.

Yee received her undergraduate degree and MFA in painting from the National University in Seoul. She is represented by Kukje Gallery in Seoul, Locks Gallery in Philadelphia, and Ota Fine Arts in Tokyo. This spring she was in the group exhibition “Earth, Fire, and Soul – Masterpieces of Korean Ceramics” at the Grand Palais in Paris. You can see more works from her Translated Vase series on her website.

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

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Undulating Shell Sculptures by Rowan Mersh 

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Turritella Duplicata II, 2015. Turritella duplicata shells.

London-based artist Rowan Mersh assembles dense rolling surfaces comprised of thousands of seashells, tiny solid objects that now appear like fluid waves. Mimicking the natural geometric patterns found in life, the artist uses responsibly sourced shells like windowpane oyster discs or duplicata shells that are tightly arranged in a labor-intensive process, one piece at a time. The shell artworks are just a small portion of Mersh’s artist practice that also spans fashion design, textile sculptures, and interactive installations. He exhibits internationally with Gallery FUMI where you can see much more of his recent works. (thnx, Laura!)

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, 2015. Windowpane oyster shell discs.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Pithvava Male, 2013. Dentalium shells.

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Pithvava Male, detail.

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Whittled Vittles: Realistic Foods Carved from Wood by Seiji Kawasaki 

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Working with tiny pieces of wood, wood sculptor Seiji Kawasaki carves realistic foods that look almost good enough to eat—depending on your taste. From chocolate bars that emerge from jagged pieces of wood to peppers and dried minnows that double as chopstick holders, the artist can create any edible item from a block of wood in just a few hours. Kawasaki has exhibited work in a number of galleries around Japan, and you can see more of his work in this Facebook gallery. If you liked this, also check out the work of Randall Rosenthal. (via My Modern Met, Booooooom.

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Bisected Boulders With Stretched Bronze Interiors by Romain Langlois 

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A self-taught sculptor, Romain Langlois studied medical books and anatomical charts to understand the human body, building his first sculptures using only plaster and clay. Seeking a more permanent material, Langlois turned to bronze, a metal he now incorporates into works that are inspired by nature rather than man. His pieces visually pull apart the natural objects that surround us—building works that appear as bisected rocks, boulders, and tree trunks. These sculptures showcase glistening bronze protruding from their insides, unleashing the perceived inner energy of each object.

Langlois is based in La Côte Martin, France. You can see more of his sculptures on Artistics or on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

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Human Skeletons Assembled with Found Coral by Gregory Halili 

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With parched white pieces of found sea coral, artist Gregory Halili has been creating skeletal parts of the human anatomy from hands and arms all the way up to a lifesize recreation of a human skeleton suspended atop a giant piece of driftwood. The irregular coral segments are uncanny stand-ins for human bones, and it’s no surprise the artist is able to identify anatomical details within sea life due to his previous work with skulls carved from mother of pearl. Halili was born in the Philippines in 1975 and spent his childhood surrounded by tropical wildlife and abundant regional flora and fauna that would go on to influence his artistic career in New Jersey. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy and at Nancy Hoffman Gallery.

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