sculpture

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Craft

Elaborate Paper Origami Tessellations and Kusudamas by Ekaterina Lukasheva

February 21, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva first tried folding paper at the age of 14 when a mathematics professor brought in a book on kusudamas. The traditional paper sphere technique requires an understanding of geometry to ensure the individual units fit together perfectly with the help of glue or string. A few years later she began to explore much more complicated designs like tessellations, aided by a university degree in mathematics and programming. Through her experimentation and commitment Lukasheva has become so proficient with paper that she’s authored several DIY books featuring some of her original designs. You can follow more of her work on Flickr and Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art Design

Jennifer Crupi’s Unconventional Jewelry Highlights Gesture As Ornament

February 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Jennifer Crupi uses carefully constructed jewelry to communicate ideas about psychology, body language, and art history. In her series, Ornamental Hands, Crupi’s structural metal attachments hold the hand in various poses that are commonly found in traditional art historical paintings. Fingers and wrists are suspended in aesthetically pleasing cuffs and splints, which the artist makes by hand using aluminum or sterling silver. Despite the eye-catching nature of Crupi’s anatomical suspensions, the ultimate intention is to display the gesture itself as the ornament, with the jewelry acting as a supportive means to that end. She describes her interest in psychology and how it has informed her work as an artist:

I started investigating body movement and became intrigued in the nuances of non-verbal behavior, posture, and gesture. I then became invested in a whole new kind of movement and for many years now it has been the source of inspiration for my work. Since I began my study into non-verbal communication, I am continually intrigued and surprised by how much we communicate with our bodies.

The Chemintz Museum of Industry in Germany and the Jewelry Museum of Vicenza, Italy both have shows currently on view which include Crupi’s work. The Vincenza exhibit includes four hundred pieces of jewelry in nine themed rooms. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website. Crupi is based in the New York metro area, where she has been a professor at Kean University since 1999.

 

 



Art Photography

New Miniature Post-Apocalyptic Environments by Lori Nix and Kathleen Gerber

February 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Lori Nix and Kathleen Gerber (previously) collaboratively produce detailed dioramas caught in the throes of natural or manmade chaos. From 2005 to 2015 the pair created a series titled The City, which imagined the post-apocalyptic interiors of abandoned violin shops, malls, and natural history museums. Empire, a follow-up suite of miniature scenes, serves as a companion to this series by looking at the same imagined future from an exterior point of view.

Nix and Gerber’s new scenes move away from a focus on water-damaged and rusty interiors to explore broad outdoor environments recently devoid of civilization. Scaffolding and bridges crumble as plants begin to poke back through cement cracks, subtle hints that nature has begun to reclaim its land.

Empire presents a world transformed by climate uncertainty and a shifting social order as it stumbles towards a new kind of frontier,” the pair explain in a statement. “These places are eerily beautiful but also unsettling in their stillness and silence. Long ago, man entered the landscape and forced nature to his will. Once grand and emblematic of strength and prosperity, these landscapes now appear abused and in decay, and it is uncertain how they will continue to (d)evolve.”

Each labor intensive model can take up to 7 months to produce, which often means that Nix and Gerber will only finish two photographs a year. The handcrafted dioramas are built from cardboard, foam, and glue—impermanent supplies which are deconstructed and recycled after each shoot.

“I am afraid of what the future holds if we do not change our ways regarding the climate, but I am also fascinated by what a changing world can bring,” Nix told Colossal. “I think this is part of why we make the work we do, to try to reconcile these different attitudes.”

The pair will exhibit images from Empire at their upcoming show at Chicago-based Catherine Edelman Gallery from March 2 to April 28. You can see more of their miniature scenes from both The City and Empire on their Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Anonymous Figures Struggle Against Nature in Porcelain Sculptures by Claudia Fontes

February 15, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Since 2013, artist Claudia Fontes (previously) has been investigating the use and meaning of the word “foreigner” in a series of small figurative sculptures. Each sculpture, which is about the size of Fontes’ hand (about 23 x 5 cm / 9 x 2 inches) is made with flaxseed paper porcelain. Anonymous figures, alone or in groups, are consumed by or emerging from organic textures that resemble grass, sea sponges, and thin shards of stone. Fontes has been based in England for the last ten years, where ‘foreigner’ is a popular pejorative term. She was born and raised in Argentina, and has also lived and worked in the Netherlands. The artist describes the process and inspiration behind the series on her website:

I began to make [Foreigners] in response to the English landscape that surrounds me and to my cultural understanding of it as a foreigner. I generally find the images out of which they are born during walks in the nearby forest and in the field that begins as soon as I cross the street where I live. During these walks, I concentrate in observing the process of transformation, interaction and the mechanisms of adaptation that happen amongst the creatures that share this particular bio-political system.

You can explore more of Fontes’ body of work, which includes other sculptures as well as conceptual pieces, on her website. (via Womens Art)

 

 



Art

A Menagerie of Ceramic Beasts and Curiosities at Messums Wiltshire’s ‘Material Earth II’

February 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Caribou Antler and Bone Handled Forks by Ann Carrington, 210 x 127 x 20cm

In Material Earth II, a group show that just opened at Messums Wiltshire, artists explore how materials can be used to morph the meaning of traditional narratives—particularly in the context of Northern European myths and fairytales. In a statement on the show, Messums describes the exhibition as “an ode to all those that are magical, fantastical and ever-changing.” Artists include Livia Marin, Ann Carrington, Bouke de Vries, and Jessica Harrison. The works span a range of materials, with an emphasis on ceramics, which is unsurprising given both the fluid nature of the material and its historic prominence in narratives of everyday life. Material Earth is on view at Messums’ 13th century exhibition barn and adjoining modern space in southwest England until April 2, 2018.

Nomad Patterns (i) by Livia Marin, 2017, Ceramic, 38 x 21 x 10

Broken Things (i) by Livia Marin, 2018, Ceramic, 15 x 10.5 x 5cm

Royal Doulton Figurine ‘Elaine’ by Jessica Harrison, found ceramic, glaze, H19 x W18.5 x D13.5cm

The Polar Bear by Barnaby Barford, 2016, Porcelain, sculpted foam, steel frame, enameled wire, painted plywood, H245 x L85 x D135cm

Troll #8 by Marlene Hartman Rasmussen, 2017, H51 x W42 x D11cm

Sissure (ommateum) by Kate MccGwire, 2016, Mixed media with goose down and pigeon quills, H42 x H42 x D6cm (framed)

Still Life with Kinfisher, 2017 by Bouke de Vries, 17th century Chinese porcelain bowl, taxidermy, wax fruit and mixed media, H33 x W33 x D24cm

Forest Fruits – Bear by Claire Partington, Earthenware, Glaze, Enamel, Lustre & Mixed Media with two interchangeable heads, 2017, H62 x W39 x D20cm

 

 



Art

New Textural Sculptures Made With Swirls of Seashells by Rowan Mersh

February 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Pithváva Praegressus II 2017, H30 X W19 XD17cm, Dentalium Shells

Rowan Mersh (previously) creates textural artworks that toe the line between two and three dimensions, using carefully placed swirls of seashells. Each artwork is made up one only one kind of shell, which the artist uses in multiples as he explores the physical qualities and hidden beauties of the material. Mersh explains his process to Colossal:

On beginning a new project I first make a small sample to understand how best to work with the material, using elements of my chosen material such as size, shape and colour of the material to inform surface pattern. This gives me a guide as to how scale and shape the resulting project. My aim with every project is to expose the true and often hidden beauty of the material I am working with and I feel this is only possible by listening to the material from day one.

The seashells are sourced from sustainable shell farmers and harvesters around the world, and Mersh creates his sculptural pieces in London, where he lives and works. Mersh is represented by Gallery FUMI and currently has new work in the gallery’s winter group show, up until February 24th.

Asabikeshiinh IV, 2017, Sliced Turritella Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh IV (detail), 2017, Sliced Turritella Shells, Fluorocarbon

Pithváva Praegressus I, 2017, H40 x W21 x D27.5cm, Dentalium Shells

Pithváva Praegressus I (detail), 2017, H40 x W21 x D27.5cm, Dentalium Shells

Asabikeshiinh V, 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh V (detail) 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh V, 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Echinothrix Imaginem Sui, 2017. H125 x W80 x D27cm, Tiger Sea Urchin Spines 

Echinothrix Imaginem Sui (detail), 2017. H125 x W80 x D27cm, Tiger Sea Urchin Spines

 

 



Art

Hollow Animal Sculptures Constructed From a Network of Metal Branches by Kang Dong Hyun

February 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Korean artist Kang Dong Hyun constructs hollow animal sculptures from a system of metallic branches. His works often have a high concentration of these sprig-like elements constructing the animal’s face, which allow the distinguishing characteristics of his house cats, birds, bulls, and elephants to take form. In one particular piece a lion’s full facial features are brought to life through his network of sculpted twigs, a furrowed brow projecting a look of worry or remorse. You can see more of Kang’s interpretations of the animal kingdom on his Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

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