Tag Archives: sculpture

Trompe L’oeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Starting with layers of Finnish birch plywood artist Ron Isaacs builds elaborately designed constructions onto which he paints, in a trompe l’oeil fashion, the delicate details of leaves sprouting from clothing or the textured surface of twigs and bark. Each piece merges three recurring subjects found in most of his works: vintage clothing, plant materials, and found objects. Isaacs shares via his artist statement:

My three primary recurring subjects are vintage clothing (for the way it continues the life of the past into the present, for its rich structures and colors and shapes, and for its anthropomorphic presence as a stand-in for the figure); plant materials in the form of sticks, leaves, and flowers (for too many reasons to list); and found objects. They combine in appropriate or surprising juxtapositions, sometimes purely as a visual “poem” of sorts and (if I’m lucky) sometimes as an image with real psychological resonance. Objects occasionally reappear in other contexts and take on new meanings, like a repertory company of actors playing different roles in different plays.

Isaacs will have several new pieces on view at Snyderman-Works Gallery in Philadelphia starting May 2, 2014. You can also see more of his work over at Tory Folliard Gallery. (via The Jealous Curator)

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

From the series “Lost & Found”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

From the series “Lost & Found” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Against the Wind” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze”

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Derweze” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | Spring, breeze in Arabic

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | detail

Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi sculpture paper birds

“Rabie” | detail

The Sydney, Australia-based artist Gunjan Aylawadi creates intricate, colorful sculptures that appear to resemble woven textiles. However, upon closer observation, her work—inspired by patterns and motifs in Islamic art—are made entirely from curled paper. The process, long and intricate, can cost the artist months on a single artwork. And not just any old paper will do. For example, “Against the Wind” is made from hand-cut strips of paper from old music books, which are then individually hand rolled and assembled. Although complicated, Aylawadi’s reasons for making art are simple: “What I enjoy most about making my work is the experience people have when they look at it,” she says. “They stop for a moment to have a closer look and the moment turns into long minutes of being fascinated by the beauty a simple medium like paper can add to the work infront of their eyes.” (via Lustik)

Kelpies Timelapse: Watch the Construction of Andy Scott’s 100 Ft. Steel Equine Statues

Kelpies Timelapse: Watch the Construction of Andy Scotts 100 Ft. Steel Equine Statues  timelapse sculpture Scotland horses

Kelpies Timelapse: Watch the Construction of Andy Scotts 100 Ft. Steel Equine Statues  timelapse sculpture Scotland horses

Kelpies Timelapse: Watch the Construction of Andy Scotts 100 Ft. Steel Equine Statues  timelapse sculpture Scotland horses

Although major construction on Andy Scott’s imposing ‘Kelpies’ sculptures near Falkirk, Scotland ended last November, this new timelapse from the Helix captures the enormity of the project in vivid detail. The gargantuan horse head sculptures completely dominate an otherwise flat landscape over the Forth & Clyde canal and promise to be a major attraction when they open to the public on April 21. The construction part takes up the first half of the video, you can jump to around 3:00 if you want to see pretty shots of the completed pieces. (via MeFi)

Haunting Ceramic Faces Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Haunting Ceramic Faces  Overgrown with Vegetation by Jess Riva Cooper sculpture ceramics

Toronto-based artist Jess Riva Cooper created this haunting collection of ceramic busts called her Viral Series as part of an artist residency last fall at The Kohler Factory in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The pieces seem to lie at the peculiar intersection of life and death, as it should be given her inspiration behind the sculptures. Cooper shares about the Viral Series via email:

In my art practice I integrate colour, drawing, and clay to create installation-based artwork. I investigate fallen economic and environmental climates in regions such as Detroit, Michigan, where houses have become feral, disappearing behind ivy, trees and Kudzu vines that were planted generations ago. In my sculptures, the world sprouts plant matter. Colour and form burst forth from quiet gardens and bring chaos to ordered spaces. Nature reclaims its place by creeping over structures. Wild floral growth subverts past states, creating the preternatural from this transformation.

Several of the pieces will be on view at The Wassaic Project opening in June, and you can see much more here. If you liked this also check out the ceramic work of Mary O’Malley. (via NOTCOT)

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyle’s Ominous Dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Secrets and Tragedy Abound Inside Thomas Doyles Ominous Dioramas sculpture dioramas

Using models and materials originally built for the backdrop of model train sets, artist Thomas Doyle (previously) creates miniature dioramas with huge implications. Quaint scenes from suburbia are smashed into smithereens, characters are caught mid-homicide, and the front lines of military conflicts weave through mountains of consumer detritus. Cool Hunting recently sat down with the New York-based artist to learn more about the narratives behind his work, the interpretation of which he leaves entirely up to the viewer.

Doyle currently has work on view at the Torrance Art Museum through May, and will appear in an upcoming Thames & Hudson book, Big Art / Small Art. (via Cool Hunting)

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

These lightweight, airy dresses look like they’re about to be adorned to a fancy gala or dinner party. But as irony would have it, they will never be worn. In fact, the dresses are actually made from Carrera Marble, the same material as the world’s most famous naked statue – Michelangelo’s David. Starting out as a solid mass of marble that can weigh several tons, they are chiseled and sculpted down by Alasdair Thomson, a sculptor living and working in Edinburgh, Scotland.

His latest work, “The Identity Collection,” (named as if it’s a fashion line) explores “the way fabric hangs and folds, and is attempting to capture that lightness and gracefulness in stone.” Effectively ceding control over his subjects, Alasdair asked his friends and family to donate garments, which he then impeccably recreated out of marble. You can see more of Alasdair’s work on his website or his Instagram account.

Anatomical 3D Self-Portrait by Joshua Harker

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Chicago-based artist Joshua Harker recently unveiled this 3D-printed sculptural self-portrait titled 21st Century Self-Portrait. Harker utilized a 3D scan of his face and a CT scan of his skull to form the components which were coupled with his trademark filigree aesthetic found in some of his other artworks (you might remember his Crania Anatomica Filigre project a while back, a piece now in his shop). 21st Century Self-Portrait was first shown at 3D Printshow in New York back in February. If you’re interested, Harker is now making custom printed masks based on your own 3D facial scan. (via Street Anatomy, Laughing Squid)

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 45 (2014) | all photos courtesy the artist

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 42 – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 45 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 45 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 43 (2014)

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 43 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 43 (2014) – detail

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Untitled Small Figure 07

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography 41 (2013)

Psychogeographies: 3D Collages Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin sculpture glass collage

Psychogeography is the act of exploring an urban environment with an emphasis on curiosity and drifting. Or, more colloquially put, a “toy box full of playful, inventive strategies for exploring cities.” For the Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin, his toy box is full of everything he finds on the street—flowers, leaves, bugs, and even dead rats, which are then composed into three-dimensional collages and sealed behind resin.

In his most recent series “Psychogeographies,” Yellin uses multiple layers of glass, each covered in detailed imagery, to create a single intricate, three-dimensional collage with a mix of magazine cut-outs and acrylic paint. When pressed to describe what he does, Yellin struggles, but not with a lack of words. Here is an excerpt from a mini-essay “concerning the difficulty of saying something about what I do.”

“Is it a copout to say “the work speaks for itself”?
I feel like it is
But I’m also awful talking about what the work is.
So sometimes I say “it speaks for itself”
But what does that even mean?

However, he does offer some advice:

First and foremost, they’re massive see-through blocks
And that’s one way to read them, listen to them “speaking”
As massive see through blocks.
Another is to listen to what’s inside them
The forms, the clippings, the dead things, the painted things,
Frozen between the layers of glass, what I’ve called
The captured and frozen “dynamism” of culture.

You can follow Dustin Yellin on Facebook or Instagram, or read more about him in this NYT article.

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