Tag Archives: sculpture

A Short Film Detailing the Miniature Replication of Nix + Gerber’s Post-Apocalyptic Studio 

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“Library” (2007), all images via The Drawing Room

Since 2005, artist Lori Nix and partner Kathleen Gerber have been producing dioramas that depict post-apocalyptic environments, everyday scenes that give the audience a glimpse of their world once nature has been left to take over. Nearly everything within the scenes is fabricated by the two under the name Nix+Gerber, with each scene taking approximately seven months from start to the final photograph. This means that the two take approximately two photographs a year, spending the bulk of their practice on miniature reproduction.

When deciding the last piece to produce for the body of work “The City,” Nix+Gerber decided to look inward. They choose to replicate their own studio, titled “The Living Room” (2013), which Nix explains actually looks like the end of the world, a disaster scene to fit within the dystopian series. For this particular project they had to work in an extremely meta fashion, scanning each CD that sat on their shelves and reproducing an even smaller replica of a subway train car that was sitting in their studio when they started production.

“It’s the little details that really make the scene come alive,” said Nix. “The fan in the back window, the paracords going everywhere, and the little items on the table.”

Despite the fact that most of Nix’s practice is focused on creating the props for each shoot, she still labels herself as a photographer rather than sculptor. “I’m not the type of photographer that is going to go out and find things to photograph,” said Nix. “I am going to create things to photograph.”

While crafting “The Living Room,” The Drawing Room produced a short documentary about Nix+Gerber’s practice which you can see below. You can also read more about the artists’ work on their blog, and see more of their miniature scenes on their Instagram and Facebook.

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“Living Room” (2013)

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“Church” (2009)

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“Control Room” (2010)

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“Anatomy Classroom” (2012)

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“Laundromat at Night” (2008)

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“The Subway” (2012)

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“Chinese Take-Out” (2013)

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“Museum of Art” (2010)

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“Beauty Shop” (2010)

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Take a Peek Inside the Studio of Insectophile Sculptor Edouard Martinet 

Fascinated by the biological forms of insects, fish, and arthropods, artist Edouard Martinet assembles gargantuan depictions of the creatures with found automotive and bicycle parts. While we’ve shared many of his sculptures here on Colossal (previously here and here), this behind-the-scenes visit of his workshop sheds a fantastic light on the scale and detail of his creations. Martinet’s ability to build something so organic from mechanical components is nothing short of astounding. Directed by Will Farrell. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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A Rotating 42-Layer Sculpture of Franz Kafka’s Head by David Cerny 

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Located in a busy shopping center in Prague, this twisting and reflective sculpture depicting the head of writer Franz Kafka is the latest kinetic artwork by controversial Czech artist David Cerny. Installed in 2014, the enormous mirrored bust is comprised of 42 independently driven layers of stainless steel and weighs in at some 45 tons. The piece brilliantly reveals Kafka’s tortured personality and unrelenting self doubt that plagued him his entire life. The layering of objects is a common motif for Cerny who built a similar rotating head that also functions as a fountain titled Metalmorphosis. (thnx, Chelsea & Diana!)

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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Figurative Found Wood Sculptures Pierced with Hundreds of Nails by Jaime Molina 

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Artist Jaime Molina works in 2, 2.5, and 3 dimensions, translating his aesthetic from large-scale paintings to sculptures, while also producing pieces that exist somewhere in-between. In this particular series, Molina has focused on bearded wooden heads, utilizing nails to form the hair of each of his subjects. Despite being placed haphazardly and with alternating sizes, the nails give the sculptures a uniform look, adding dimension to the male heads formed from found wood.

A few of the works open to showcase a center skull, intrinsic sculptures that are either left as raw wood or painted in a similar manner as his public murals. You can see more of the Denver-based artist’s sculptures and murals on his Instagram. (thnx, Laura!)

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Crocheted Wire Anatomy by Anne Mondro 

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Since the earliest days of her artistic career, Michigan artist Anne Mondro has been captivated by human anatomy, creating her own interpretations of internal organs and body forms through crocheted sculptures. Working with thin steel and copper wire, she spends hundreds of hours on a single artwork, manifesting her own interpretations of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. “Crocheting wire enables me to create interwoven forms that are structurally strong, yet visually and physically light,” Mondro shares. “The forms allude to ethereal silhouettes associated with shadows, ghosts or decay.”

Though anatomy is an ongoing focus for Mondo, she’s also lent her crocheting abilities to the construction of more mechanical objects, namely the recreation of a Model T engine for the 2011 Love Lace exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum.

Late this year Mondo has an exhibition at Ceres Gallery in New York titled Intertwine, and you can explore more of her work here. (via Bored Panda)

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Ethereal Sculptures and Wearable Orbs Formed From Synthetic Fabric by Mariko Kusumoto 

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All images provided by Mariko Kusumoto

Japanese artist Mariko Kusumoto uses translucent fabric to produce balloon-like objects, orbs that contain various forms trapped within their soft exterior. The creations inside range from smaller versions of the spherical sculptures to sea creatures and cars, playful forms that fit the bright colors Kusumoto chooses for her works. To set the polyester fabric into the shapes she desires she heats the pieces to the right temperature, allowing the material to memorize the shape she wishes to create. These works are then formed into sculptural or wearable objects, 3D jewelry that can be worn around the neck.

“My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made,” said Kusumoto in her artist statement. ” I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected.”

The Massachusetts-based artist’s work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Kock Collection at the Swiss National Museum, Racine Art Museum, and Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens and is represented by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, MA. You can see more of her sculptural and wearable works on her Facebook.

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