Tag Archives: sculpture

New Wearable Textile Sculptures by Artist Mariko Kusumoto 


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA

Artist Mariko Kusumoto (previously) continues to amaze us with her ability to turn textiles into delicate orbs that can be worn as necklaces, brooches, and rings. While the artworks are often inspired by patterns or shapes found in nature, the pieces are left intentionally ambiguous as a way to engage the imagination. She shares in her artist statement:

My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made. I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected. A playful, happy atmosphere pervades my work. I always like to leave some space for the viewer’s imagination; I hope the viewer experiences discovery, surprise, and wonder through my work.

Most of the pieces scene here are constructed with delicate polyester fabrics, a material that is both flexible in its application and extremely durable, allowing for her lightweight designs. You can see more of Kusumoto’s fiber explorations and metalwork at Mobilia Gallery and on her website.


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA


Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, MA









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Otherworldly Pencil Sculptures by Jennifer Maestre 


Originally inspired by the form and function of a sea urchin, artist Jennifer Maestre constructs unwieldy organic forms using pencils and pencil shavings that bloom like unworldly flowers. Some of her latest pieces appear to have grown tentacles and rest atop pedestals like scaley octopi. The artworks are designed to simultaneously attract the viewer but also offer a certain aesthetic defense. She shares in her artist statement:

The spines of the urchin, so dangerous yet beautiful, serve as an explicit warning against contact. The alluring texture of the spines draws the touch in spite of the possible consequences. The tension unveiled, we feel push and pull, desire and repulsion. The sections of pencils present aspects of sharp and smooth for two very different textural and aesthetic experiences. Paradox and surprise are integral in my choice of materials.

Several pieces by Maestre were recently on view as part of an exhibition titled “Waste to Art” in Baku, Azerbaijan. You can see more of her works-in-progress on Facebook.









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Animal Sculptures Comprised of Densely Rolled Newspaper by Artist Chie Hitotsuyama 


Japanese paper artist Chie Hitotsuyama deftly creates textured sculptures of animals using a technique involving rolled strips of wet newspaper. The compact application of each newspaper segment proves to be an elegant method of forming the wild fur of snow monkeys or the density of scales found on the back of an iguana. For Hitotsuyama, these details are critical as she seeks to create the most lifelike sculptures possible.

“More than anything else, I’m particular about the realistic feel of the animals,” she shares with Kokusai Pulp & Paper. “Animals that live in nature are equal to us in the sense that we live together on this planet. Sometimes they sleep. Sometimes they eat. They are living ordinary everyday lives just like us. I would like keep insisting on reality and producing my life-sized work as much as possible in order to convey their lives.”

Hitotsuyama is currently showing several pieces as part of a residency and exhibition at MOAH:CEDAR in Lancaster, California through January 7, 2017. You can watch a video of her at work included below, and see much more on Strictly Paper and on her website.










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The Absurdly Elongated Sculptural Objects of the Dufala Brothers 


Special Air Mission 2800


Lock and Key, 2010. Master locks, brass. Photo by Claire Iltis.

The Dufala Brothers have a knack for the surreal, creating modern objects that have been elongated and stretched into abstract versions of shoes, household appliances, and tools. The creative works mimic the original objects so well that it is difficult to separate the two in one’s mind, such as a Chuck Taylor that is made so long it folds on top of oneself, and a lock made for a key that is four times the standard size.

The Philadelphia duo explore this exaggerated scale with humor, utilizing a variety of media such as sculpture, theater, performance, digital media, and drawing in their combined practice. Both graduated from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and are represented by Fleisher/Ollman Gallery in Philadelphia where they currently reside. You can see more of the pair’s absurd works on their website. (via postmodern.jpg & thnx, Tim!)


Special Air Mission 2800


Long Chuck

Step Broom

Step Broom

Special Air Mission 2800, 2009. Rubber, vinyl, shoelaces. 6 x 4 x 32"

Special Air Mission 2800, 2009. Rubber, vinyl, shoelaces. 6 x 4 x 32″


Hammer with Oversized Handle

Hammer with Oversized Handle

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New Anatomical Specimens Made from Hand-Dyed Wool and Silk by Lana Crooks 


Tricking the eye to view textile as bone, Lana Crooks (previously) works with bits of hand-dyed wool and silk to recreate the sun-drenched skeletons of snakes, birds, and humans, displaying them each in bell jars. She considers he works “faux specimens” as her delicate sculptures blend science, art, and fantasy. Often her inspirations come from books as well as real specimens, like the ones found in the back rooms of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History.

Crooks curated the group exhibition All That Remains, where her work can also be seen, at the Stranger Factory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She also has an upcoming two-person exhibition at the Chicago-based Rotofugi titled Night Fall, which opens December 9th, 2016. You can see more of her textile skeletons on her Facebook and Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)










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Taxidermy Renderings of Dr. Seuss’ Fantastical Beings 


Smiling goofily from their wooden mounts sit the imaginings of Dr. Seuss, animals with bizarre names like the Turtle-Necked Sea-Turtle, Two Horned Douberhannis, and Semi-Normal Green-Lidded Fawn. The beasts were not designed by fanatics of Dr. Seuss’ famous children’s books, but are based on works created by the man himself over 80 years ago, each originating from an obscure collection of paintings, drawings, and sculpture known as The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss Collection.

These particular sculptures are resin casts adapted from Theodor Seuss Geisel’s (aka Dr. Seuss) Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy. The original works utilized actual remains of lions, rabbits, and deer that died at the Springfield Zoo where his father was a director. Geisel used these ears, antlers, and shells to form realistic copies of his 2D fictional characters and asked his wife Audrey Geisel to wait until after this death to reveal his works to the public. Audrey stayed true to his wish and waited until 1997, six years after his death, to begin commissioning the sculptures.

The 3D doppelgängers, part of a traveling exhibition titled If I Ran the Zoo, each bear a posthumously printed or engraved signature by the late artist, commissioned specifically by the Dr. Seuss Estate. The exhibition of 17 sculptures in their entirety along with rare paintings and drawings will be on view at LaMantia Gallery in Northport, New York from November 12-27, 2016. The exhibition is timed with the release of the Powerless Puffer, the final cast resin sculpture in the series. (via The Creators Project)








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