Tag Archives: sculpture

Frames Which Frame Themselves by Taylor Holland 

1800s Empire (2014)

1800s Empire (2014), all images via Taylor Holland

Paris-based American artist Taylor Holland explores how technological methods interact with a physical reality, a concept which is showcased in his series FRA[MES]. Utilizing digital methods copied onto custom molds, Holland fills ornate 18th and 19th with reorganized details from their own design, merging the style of art and frame.

Fra[mes] is a collaboration between algorithm, artist, and master craftsman, which not only bridges the gap between digital media and old-world craftsmanship, but gives the computer an equal hand in the creative process,” says Holland in an artist statement on his website.

The series is ongoing, with a previous iteration utilizing frames from the Louvre. You can view more from Holland on his Instagram and Tumblr. (via Colossal Submissions)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

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Pixelated Wood Sculptures Carved by Hsu Tung Han 

In a clash of digital and analogue, artist Hsu Tung Han carves figurative sculptures from wood that appear to be dissolving into fields of pixels. The Taiwanese artist views the carved figures of men and women as puzzles, planning for each configuration through a series of drawings and clay models. Han then produces the final work from segments of walnut, teak, or African wax wood, carving cubed pieces from the sculptures to give the illusion of suspended levitation or a paused transformation. You can see more of Han’s pixelated wood works on his Flickr. (via Fubiz)

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Experimental Cutlery That Challenges Traditional Ideas of Usability 

Design by Maki Okamoto. All images via Steinbeisser.

Merging design and haute cuisine, Amsterdam-based company Steinbeisser collaborates with designers and artists to produce surreal cutlery that operate beyond traditional ideas of usability for their online store Jouw… (Dutch for “your”). The tableware doesn’t necessarily make the experience of eating easier, but rather encourages the user to reconsider their relationship to utensils and how they are used.

“Yet it is not only about beauty, we also believe in sustainability,” explain co-creators Jouw Wijnsma and Martin Kullik on Jouw…’s website. “That’s why all the pieces are crafted only from natural materials, such as wood, calabash, stone, clay and glass. Often sourced locally and using materials that are found, recycled and/or reused. Even the smaller parts of the pieces such as glue, paint and glazing, are organic and biodegradable.”

One artist that incorporates reused materials is Swedish artist Maki Okamoto who works which antique silver nickel cutlery which she inherited from her husband’s grandmother. You can see more examples of experimental cutlery by more than 20 artists on Jouw…'s website and Instagram.

Design by Joo Hyung Park.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Nils Hint.

Design by Maki Okamoto.

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Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood Reflect Light in a Rainbow of Color 

Cambridge-based artist Chris Wood (previously) continues to produce stunning light sculptures utilizing panels of dichroic glass that refract light in a vivid array of color. Her works have appeared in numerous exhibitions over the last few years and have even been incorporated into nearly a dozen displays worldwide for Fendi Fashion House. Wood has also created installations using glasses and lights that reflect patterns onto nearby surfaces. Seen here are several pieces from shows at the Shanghai Museum of Glass and the China Art Museum, you can see more recent work on her website.

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Miniature Narrative-Based Sculptures Created From Balsa Wood by Vera van Wolferen 

Dutch multidisciplinary artist Vera van Wolferen (previously) produces miniature balsa wood sculptures, architectural objects that are either incorporated into animations or left motionless to tell their own stories. Her static works are often displayed beneath glass bell jars, leaving the audience to imagine that the tiny tree houses, cottages, and campers are neatly contained within their own universes. Van Wolferen also uses simple craft materials like cotton to enhance her sets, making it appear as if her sculpted homes are resting amongst the clouds.

You can view more of van Wolferen’s wood sculptures and sets, as well as some of her cut paper illustrations, on her InstagramFacebook and Behance.

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Local and International Artists Produce 21 Light Installations For the Inaugural Toronto Light Festival 

Images via Thane Lucas/Toronto Light Festival

Set within a district of Victorian industrial buildings, the Toronto Light Festival is a free 45-day festival occurring during this year’s winter months as a way to creatively draw the city’s inhabitants out of their homes. Featuring 21 diverse light installations built by local and international artists and thousands of glowing bulbs, the festival covers a total of 13 acres in the city’s Distillery District. Installations range from a series of lit figures appearing to jump from the roof of one of the historic buildings to two red, geometric cats prowling an included alleyway, with several multi-colored works in-between.

You can catch Toronto’s first ever light art festival until March 12, or follow the festival on Instagram to catch snapshots of the glowing installations.

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