Tag Archives: sculpture

A Girl Encounters a Giant White Horse Frozen in Mid-Air Within the Venice Biennale’s Argentinian Pavilion 

A girl is seen softly touching the nose of a giant, white horse frozen in mid-air within the Argentinian Pavilion of this year’s Venice Biennale, a large sculptural work by artist Claudia FontesThe Horse Problem, and the Argentinian Pavilion, are located within the biennale’s Arsenal building, the largest pre-industrial production center of the world. Made long ago from wood, bricks, and iron, the building is one that could have only been built by horse-power, the work highlighting the hidden influences the animal had on the city.

The installation, which also features 400 white rocks scattered around the two central figures, is inspired by 19th-century icons around which Argentina’s national presence was falsely based. Fontes uses these borrowed characters in her present work to examine how nations develop across history, especially in her own country of Argentina.

“By highlighting how the destinies of the human and horse species have been intertwined through exploitation from the very moment that horses were domesticated, The Horse Problem offers in a flash, a way to reinterpret history in a different way, a chance to construct an alternative narrative for our future as species,” said Gabriel Giorgi in his essay for the work’s catalogue.

The Horse Problem is curated by Andrés Duprat, director of the National Museum of Fine Arts of Argentina. You can see Fontes’ work in the 2017 Venice Biennale through November 26, 2017. (via Art Ruby)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

New Architecturally-Inspired Artworks Created From Layers of Laser-Cut Paper by Eric Standley 

Phidala. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Artist Eric Standley (previously here and here) laser cuts sheets of paper, creating intricately patterned forms by stacking the sheets over 100 layers high. The final works reflect classical stained glass windows, and are inspired by geometric patterns found in both Gothic and Islamic architecture. Recently these designs reference fractal geometry, a rhythmic pattern that is self-replicating.

“These rhythms are found at a cosmological scale in the ever-expanding universe, across culture and time in Gothic and Islamic architecture as well as at the profoundly fundamental building blocks of life,” said Standley. “When a DNA braid is viewed from the top-down, the layered double helix rotation abides by the golden ratio (phi). Waves along the braid conceal and reveal strata of information.”

Standley applied this golden ratio during the construction process for his pieces Kismet and Phidala. Using phi as a guide for certain compositional decisions, Standley deviated from his typically strict mathematical rotations.

Standley’s solo exhibition Strata at Marta Hewett Gallery in Cincinnati, Oh contains both of these new phi-centered works, and continues through June 3, 2017. You can see more of the artist’s works on his website.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Kismet. Cut paper, wood and gold leaf, 24″ x 24″, 2017.

Kismet, detail. Cut paper, wood and gold leaf, 24″ x 24″, 2017.

Arch 6. Cut paper, watercolor, 24″ x 28″, 2016.

Arch 6, detail. Cut paper, watercolor, 24″ x 28″, 2016.

Arch 6, detail. Cut paper, watercolor, 24″ x 28″, 2016.

 

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

The Incredible Sand Sculptures of Toshihiko Hosaka 

Toshihiko Hosaka began making sand sculptures in art school and has been using beaches and sand boxes as his canvas for almost 20 years. His work defies what we typically think of as sand art as he sculpts and carves the loose, granular substance as if it were some malleable form of clay.

There is no core, mold or adhesive ever used throughout the process: just sand. The only trick Hosaka uses (and this is commonly accepted) is a hardening spray applied to his sculpture only after it’s been completed, in order to prevent wind and sun from eroding it for a few days.

Earlier this month Hosaka competed in the Fulong International Sand Sculpture Art Festival along with 22 other international professional sand sculptors. The theme for the contest was “Hero” and Hosaka spent 3 days sculpting a figure of Musashi Miyamoto, which was awarded 1st prize on May 6th. Hosaka depicted the 16th century expert Japanese swordsman seated down in a calm position, sword tucked under his belt.

The artist continues to be active in and around Japan. According to an interview, he’ll be at the Sakaide Minato Matsuri on May 18th creating a salt sculpture (which will go on view on the 27th). Then on July 15th he’ll be at the Ishikarihama Sand Park. He’s also available for group workshops where he’ll teach you everything there is to know about sand sculpting.

In the ultimate display of pursuing perfection, Hosaka even collaborated with a Japanese chemical company to create his own environmentally friendly Sand Art Glue, that substance he uses to spray on his sculptures once they’re complete. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

“Musashi Miyamoto” received 1st prize at the Fulong International Sand Sculpture Art Festival.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Support: Monumental Hands Rise from the Water in Venice to Highlight Climate Change 

Artist Lorenzo Quinn (previously) just finished the installation of a monumental sculpture for the 2017 Venice Biennale. Titled Support, the piece depicts a pair of gigantic hands rising from the water to support the sides of the Ca’ Sagredo Hotel, a visual statement of the impact of climate change and rising sea levels on the historic city. Quinn is known for his work with the human body—specifically hands—that he incorporates into everything from large-scale sculptures down to jewelry designs. Quinn is represented by Halcyon Gallery, and you can see more installation photos and videos of Support on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Endangered Species Cut from Paper by Patrick Cabral 

As part of an ongoing series to highlight various endangered species, Manila-based paper artist Patrick Cabral created these amazing cut paper portraits of tigers, pandas, pangolins, and other threatened animals. The multi-layered works are cut by hand and incorporate decorative flourishes and patterns into the the face of each animal. Working since last November, Cabral envisioned the series as a way to support endangered animals, and he’s donating half of the proceeds from the sale of each sculpture to WWF Philippines. You can see more from the series on Instagram.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Creating The Never-Ending Bloom: The Amazing Mathematical Wonders of John Edmark 

We’ve long marveled at artist John Edmark's (previously) kinetic objects that function as a medium to express a variety of mathematical formulas and concepts. The spiral-like sculptures often defy description and even when looking at them it’s hard to understand how they work, something he refers to as “instruments that amplify our awareness of the sometimes tenuous relationship between facts and perception.” The folks at SciFri recently visited with Edmark in his studio to learn more about how he works and to catch a glimpse of some rather unusual sculptures he’s created over the last few years.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 1381234...»