Tag Archives: sculpture

New Twisted Sculptures Carved from Pine Wood by Xavier Puente Vilardell 

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Sculptor Xavier Puente Vilardell (previously) carves blocks of pine wood into twisted screws and ribbons, redefining the solid material into one that appears both light and pliable. Some of the final works are varnished with a deep, glossy coat, while others are left to look more natural. Despite this differentiation in finish, all of Vilardell’s works showcase the natural grain of the original blocks of wood, at once expressing their similarity and originality. You can see more of Vilardell’s recent sculptures on both his Behance and website.

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A Surreal Three-Dimensional World Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin 

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

Dustin Yellin‘s latest installation (previously here and here) is more of an encased world than environment—ten modular glass blocks that together measure 20 feet long. Densely layered, each glass brick contains thousands of images meticulously sourced from magazines and books, arranged to created Yellin’s own alternate National Geographic universe. The pieces, which differ in dimension at the ends of the work and are uniformly sized near the middle, all contribute to a larger, and perhaps forecasted, story of war and peril. Not a pleasant look at the future of humanity, Yellin outlines scenes of greed and global warming, literally showing the fall of humanity from the tip of a glass-encased mountain to the depths of a turbulent sea.

This installation, titled Ten Parts, is part of a solo exhibition of Yellin’s work by the same name at GRIMM Gallery in Amsterdam which opens this Friday, November 25, and runs through January 7, 2017.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

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Tessellated Origami Sculptures by Goran Konjevod 

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Origami artist Goran Konjevod brings an extensive background in mathematics and theoretical computer science into the folds of his elegant paper sculptures, textured abstract forms that twist, spiral, and cascade. Konjevod practiced origami as a hobby for many years, usually folding the designs of others until 2005 when he began producing some of his original designs. Most of his pieces involve tessellations where repetitive geometric designs are carefully folded to create patterns within the paper. (via Strictly Paper)

Recently Konjevod’s work has been collected and displayed in exhibitions like the recent 8th Annual Sanchez Art Center 50|50 Show and with the Ohio Craft Museum. You can find more work on his Instagram.

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Porcelain Sculptures Inspired by English and Japanese Botanics by Hitomi Hosono 

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Merging botanical forms from England with the delicate plant shapes from her childhood in Japan, ceramic artist Hitomi Hosono produces delicate layered sculptures that appear as frozen floral arrangements. Often monochromatic, the works are focused on carved detail rather than color—repetition of form making each piece uniquely beautiful.

“The subjects of my current porcelain works are shapes inspired by leaves and flowers,” said Hosono in an artist statement. “I study botanical forms in the garden. I find myself drawn to the intricacy of plants, examining the veins of a leaf, how its edges are shaped, the layering of a flower’s petals. I look, I touch, I draw.”

Hosono’s plant-inspired works were recently exhibited with Adrian Sassoon gallery during The Salon Art + Design fair in NYC November 9-13, 2016. You can see more of her work on her website, as well as in the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop. (via cfile.daily)

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New Modernist Sandcastles Constructed by Calvin Seibert 

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Artist Calvin Seibert spent part of the summer on Rockaway Beach in Queens where he made quick work of erecting several of his trademark geometric sandcastles that we’ve admired for years here on Colossal. Seibert is a professional sculptor who relishes the challenge of building these temporary sand structures inspired by brutalist architecture and aspects of modernism. He shares about his process:

Building “sandcastles” is a bit of a test. Nature will always be against you and time is always running out. Having to think fast and to bring it all together in the end is what I like about it. I rarely start with a plan, just a vague notion of trying to do something different each time. Once I begin building and forms take shape I can start to see where things are going and either follow that road or attempt to contradict it with something unexpected. In my mind they are always mash-ups of influences and ideas. I see a castle, a fishing village, a modernist sculpture, a stage set for the oscars all at once. When they are successful they don’t feel contained or finished. They become organic machines that might grow and expand. I am always adding just one more bit and if time allowed I wouldn’t stop.

Seen here are a number of his designs from the last year but you can explore hundreds more over on Flickr. (via Laughing Squid, Adam Savage)

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My New Old Chair: Artist “Fixes” Broken Wood Furniture with Opposing Materials 

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As part of her ongoing series titled My Old New Chair, visual artist Tatiane Freitas repairs broken wood furniture by replacing the missing pieces with translucent acrylic. Much like the Japanese practice of kintsugi or medieval parchment repair, her designs restore functionality to the chairs while acknowledging the history of each piece. One chair from the series was recently included in the Clairvoyance exhibition at Guy Hepner in New York, and you can see more of her latest work on her website and Instagram. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Side note: did you know the country of Sweden offers tax breaks to people who choose to repair household appliances and bicycles instead of throwing them away?

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