Tag Archives: sculpture

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at ‘Sculpture by the Sea’

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
Our memory in your place. 2014. Photo by GCImagery.

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
Our memory in your place. 2014. Photo by Deepwarren.

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
Our memory in your place. 2014. Photo by Deepwarren.

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011.

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011.

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011.

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at Sculpture by the Sea wire steel sculpture animals
I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011. Photo by Francisco Martins.

South Korean sculptor Byeong Doo Moon unveiled a new stainless steel sculpture as part of Sculpture by the Sea 2014 earlier this month in Sydney. The intricately welded peacock is titled “Our memory in your place” and is a stylistic companion to Moon’s 2011 sculpture, a deer with an unwieldy set of antlers that resembles tree limbs. The annual sculpture event is now in its 18th year and runs through November 9th. You can see plenty more photos of this year’s participants on their website. (via Visual News)

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New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

New Layered Glass Wave Sculptures by Ben Young sculpture ocean glass

Sculptor Ben Young (previously) just unveiled a collection of new glass sculptures prior to the Sculpture Objects Functional Art + Design (SOFA) Fair in Chicago next month. Young works with laminated clear float glass atop cast concrete bases to create cross-section views of ocean waves that look somewhat like patterns in topographical charts. The self-taught artist is currently based in Sydney but was raised in Waihi Beach, New Zealand, where the local landscape and surroundings greatly inspired his art. You can learn more about his sculptures over on Kirra Galleries, and follow him on Facebook.

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Desire to Fly: Samantha Bryan’s Hand-Crafted Sculptures of Whimsical Aviator Fairies Going about Their Daily Lives

Desire to Fly: Samantha Bryans Hand Crafted Sculptures of Whimsical Aviator Fairies Going about Their Daily Lives sculpture fairies

Desire to Fly: Samantha Bryans Hand Crafted Sculptures of Whimsical Aviator Fairies Going about Their Daily Lives sculpture fairies

Desire to Fly: Samantha Bryans Hand Crafted Sculptures of Whimsical Aviator Fairies Going about Their Daily Lives sculpture fairies

Desire to Fly: Samantha Bryans Hand Crafted Sculptures of Whimsical Aviator Fairies Going about Their Daily Lives sculpture fairies

Desire to Fly: Samantha Bryans Hand Crafted Sculptures of Whimsical Aviator Fairies Going about Their Daily Lives sculpture fairies

From a very young age, mixed-media artist Samantha Bryan was obsessed with flight, and while she never became a pilot, it’s a passion she carried through school and into her artistic career as a sculptor. The central subject of her artwork is the creation of fairy-like aviators going about their daily lives, often riding in whimsical flying contraptions. Richard Foot and Arron Fowler of R&A Collaborations recently shot this great stop-motion profile of Bryan as she talks about her inspiration and creates a few of her delicately crafted pieces. (via The Kid Should See This)

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Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean sculpture ocean environment

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean sculpture ocean environment

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean sculpture ocean environment

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean sculpture ocean environment

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean sculpture ocean environment

Ocean Atlas: A Massive Submerged Girl Carries the Weight of the Ocean sculpture ocean environment

Installed earlier this month on the western coastline of New Providence in Nassau, Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas,” is the lastest underwater sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor (previously), known for his pioneering effort to build submerged sculpture parks in oceans around the world. Taylor’s cement figures are constructed with a sustainable pH-neutral material that encourages the growth of coral and other marine wildlife, effectively forming an artificial reef that draws tourists away from diving hotspots in over-stressed areas.

Towering 18 feet tall and weighing in at more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas is reportedly the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater. The artwork depicts a local Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the ocean above her in reference to the Ancient Greek myth of Atlas, the primordial Titan who held up the celestial spheres. The piece was commissioned by B.R.E.E.F (Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation), as part of an ongoing effort to build an underwater sculpture garden in honor of its founder, Sir Nicholas Nuttal. You can see a bit more over on Atlas Obscura and at the Creator’s Project, who are working on a documentary about the piece.

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New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb wood sculpture architecture
Aurelie Laurent/Petit Jules Photos

Furniture-maker-turned-sculptor James McNabb (previously) just opened a new exhibition of work titled Metros at Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami. McNabb continues his exploration of architectural shapes using an improvised form of woodworking frequently described as “sketching with a bandsaw.” Without regard to the design or stability a true architect might utilize, he instead works with more abstract shapes cut from repurposed and exotic woods which in turn become component pieces for larger sculptures resembling wheels or tables. McNabb shares via email:

I compare hyperrealistic painting to fine woodworking. Both are slow, tedious, detail oriented process that require great care and consideration through every stage of making. In contrast, I compare my style of rapid bandsaw mark making to the fast paced nature of spray can art. It’s my attempt at “urban woodworking”.

Metros will be on view through October 28, 2014 and you can see more of McNabb’s recent work right here.

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A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

Emulsifier is a curious glass sculpture designed by artist Thomas Medicus. The piece is built from 160 glass strips that are hand-painted on four sides with complimentary images. Only when the object is rotated and viewed from the right angle do the images appear. Watch the video above to see how it works.

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Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

When first contemplating these glass sculptures by Seattle-based artist Carol Milne, your imagination runs wild trying to figure out how she does it. Glass has a melting point of around 1,500°F (815°C), so how could it possibly manipulated into neatly organized yarn-like strands that are looped around knitting needles. The answer lies in a technique invented by Milne in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

You can see much more of Milne’s work at the Glass Art Society, on Facebook, and in her online gallery. (via Lustik)

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