Tag Archives: sculpture

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use. Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag (previously), who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next. “The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display through Aug 31, 2014.

As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel. His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.

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3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

3D Sculptural Paintings by Shintaro Ohata sculpture painting optical illusion

Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata (previously) currently has two new sculptural paintings on view at Mizuma Gallery in Singapore. Ohata places vibrantly painted figurative sculptures in the foreground of similarly styled paintings that when viewed directly appear to be a single artwork. In some sense it appears as though the figures have broken free from the canvas. These artworks, along with several of his other paintings, join works by Yoddogawa Technique, Enpei Ito, Osamu Watanabe, and Akira Yoshida, for the Sweet Paradox show that runs through August 10th. (via F*ck Yeah Painting, My Modern Met)

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New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser-Cut Paper by Eric Standley

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Either/Or Newmarch. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2014.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Either/Or Newmarch, detail. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2014.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Either/Or Newmarch, detail. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2014.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Zeno of Elea. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2013.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper Zeno of Elea, detail. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2013.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Zeno of Elea II. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2013.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Zeno of Elea II, detail. Cut paper, 20″x20″, 2013.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Either/Or Tetragon 6.7.1. Cut paper, 8″x10″, 2014.

New Stained Glass Windows Made from Stacked Laser Cut Paper by Eric Standley sculpture paper
Either/Or Tetragon 6.7.1, detail. Cut paper, 8″x10″, 2014.

Virginia-based artist Eric Standley (previously) brings a whole new meaning to the term “cutting edge” with his methodical stained glass windows created entirely from laser-cut paper. Standley stacks well over 100 sheets for many of his pieces which involve months of planning, drawing, and assembly. The artist says his inspiration comes from the geometry found in Gothic and Islamic architectural ornamentation which he somewhat jokingly calls “folk math.”

Standley currently has work as part of “Fold, Paper, Scissors” at the Mesa Arts Center in Arizona, and is an included artist in the upcoming book Mandala Masterworks by Paul Heussenstamm. You can see many new pieces from the last several years on his website.

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A Swirling Willow Figure Rises from the Grounds of Shambellie House in Scotland

A Swirling Willow Figure Rises from the Grounds of Shambellie House in Scotland trees sculpture plants gardening

The Whirling Dervish was a willow sculpture by artist Trevor Leat that was installed in 2012 at Shambellie House, in New Abbey, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. Leat is known for his work with willow trees which he grows organically for use in furniture, baskets, and sculptures. Unfortunately, Shambellie House, which housed the National Museum of Costume, closed in 2013, so this piece may no longer be viewable. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf turtles steampunk sculpture
Photo by Gina Sanderson

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures. His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors. You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

Animal and Insect Sculptures Wrapped in Crocheted Webbing by Joana Vasconcelos sculpture crochet animals

In an ongoing series by Joana Vasconcelos, the Portuguese artist has been wrapping various animals—wasps, lizards, snakes, crabs, lobsters, frogs, bull-heads, donkey heads, horse heads, wolves and even cats—in five-needle lace, handmade cotton crochet. But these aren’t any old animals. Vasconcelos has appropriated the ceramic artwork of Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro (1846-1905), one of the most renowned Portuguese artists of the 19th century.

Each of the pieces “are ambiguously imprisoned/protected by a second-skin in crochet-work,” says Vasconcelos. At once both beautiful and strange, the work stands as a testament to the extraordinary craftsmanship of the artist but also as a one-upmanship of maternal femininity and domesticity. The use of crochet to mummify the ceramic animals “opens up a vast and rich field of interpretation” that challenges our preconceptions of femininity, as well as our notions of tradition and modernity. (via Trendland, Ghost in the Machine)

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Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal Leaves Miniature Cement Skeletons on the Streets of Mexico street art sculpture miniature Mexico cement

Artist Isaac Cordal (previously) is well-known for his creation and placement of miniature cement figures in public places around the world as part of an ongoing series called Cement Eclipses. While the meaning behind each tiny sculpture is intentionally ambiguous, it’s impossible to look at each piece without imagining a story. The pieces often appear in scenes of mourning or despair, as part of what Cordal says is commentary on humankind’s disregard for nature and as foreshadowing of potential consequences. From his artist statement:

Isaac Cordal is sympathetic toward his little people and you can empathize with their situations, their leisure time, their waiting for buses and even their more tragic moments such as accidental death, suicide or family funerals. The sculptures can be found in gutters, on top of buildings, on top of bus shelters; in many unusual and unlikely places.

These new skeletal works are part of a 2013 series he created in Chiapas, Mexico, and he also had work this summer at ArtScape 2014 in Sweden. You can see more over on Facebook. (via Supersonic)

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