Tag Archives: sculpture

Branching & Looping Wooden Tables by Michael Beitz

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Artist Michael Beitz (previously) designed two more of his amazing sculptural tables in the last year. The first is called Tree Picnic, a functional 50-foot-long picnic table that branches like a tree at the Michigan Riley Farm in Buffalo, NY. The other piece is a 18-foot-long tangle of looping wood titled Not Now, referring to the table’s anti-social design. The sculpture was on view last year as part of his solo show called Maybe Later at the Roswell Museum and Art Center. You can see more of his strange interpretations of everyday furniture in this online gallery. (via Contemporist)

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Meticulously Handcrafted Paper Objects by Zim & Zou

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Master paper crafting duo Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann of Zim & Zou (previously) continue to create some of the most eye-catching paper illustrations around. The two French designers focus mostly on handcrafted objects made from materials like paper, thread, wood, and leather for one-of-a-kind window displays, editorial illustrations, and posters. Some of their most recent projects include a lovely poster commissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to encourage childhood vaccinations as well as work for the SXSW Film Festival and Hermès Maison Shanghai. See more on Behance.

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Layered Glass Sculptures Mimic the Everyday Drama of the Natural World

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White Water, all images provided by K. William LeQuier

Plume

Plume

Medusa

Medusa

Maelstrom

Maelstrom

Euphoria

Euphoria

Curl No. 5

Curl No. 5

Cabriole

Cabriole

Glass artist K. William LeQuier‘s glass work is inspired by the drama of the natural world and its everyday events. His sculptures reflect this inspiration by mimicking the natural movements of the sea and its creatures. Each sculpture is held steady by a simple black armature, a hint to the artist’s hand involved in the creation of each glass sculpture.

After years of blowing glass vessels LeQuier moved to the sandblasting process where he learned he could generate textures similar to natural erosion. In addition to forming works that appear as waves, he creates work reminiscent of sea urchins, sponges, and anemones. Most interesting about the sculptures are their layered composition, a complexity that could easily be looked over due to the high level of skill apparent in each sea-themed object.

Currently LeQuier lives and works in Vermont with his wife Mary Angus. His work can be found in the permanent collections of museums across the country including (but not limited to) the American Glass Museum, Indianapolis Art Museum, National Liberty Museum, and Philadelphia Museum of Art. (via My Modern Met)

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Blowtorch Filigree: Lace Patterns Delicately Cut from Industrial Steel Objects by Cal Lane

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Gutter Snipes, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

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Gutter Snipes, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

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Gutter Snipes, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007, Courtesy Art Mur

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Car Bombing, 2007

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Veiled Hood #2, 2014, Couresy Art Mur

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Veiled Hood #3, 2014, Couresy Art Mur

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Ammunition Box, 2011, Courtesy Art Mur

Cal Lane works in a series of “Industrial Doilies”, producing works that use contradiction to create an empathetic form. Lane imparts highly industrial materials with touches of delicacy, adding filigree to car parts, oil tanks, and shovels with a blowtorch. Her chosen patterns also exist on another level, their compositions inspired by those used in religious ceremonies such as weddings, christenings, and funerals.

Lane’s use of lace simultaneously hides and exposes the materials in which she chooses to work, revealing and covering up tough materials with delicate pattern. Through this notion, Lane also institutes a sense of humor explaining, “Like a Wrestler in a tutu, the absurdity of having opposing extremist stances is there for reaction and not rational understanding; the rational discussion arises in the search for how one thing defines the other by its proximity.”

Lane has studied painting, welding and sculpture and holds an MFA in Sculpture from the State University of New York. She exhibits works with galleries internationally including ones located in Montreal, Santa Monica, and New York City. All images here courtesy Art Mur.

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Artist Niyoko Ikuta Uses Layers of Laminated Sheet Glass to Create Spiraling Geometric Sculptures

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Since the early 1980s Japanese artist Niyoko Ikuta has explored the properties of glass which she uses to make etheral geometric sequences manifested as layered sculptures. One of the leading figures in Japanese glass art, Ikuta’s works have been collected by institutions worldwide including the V&A in London and the Corning Museum of Glass in the U.S. She shares about her work via V&A:

I am captivated by the complexity of light as it reflects, refracts, and passes through broken cross sections of plate glass. In 1980 I began making artwork by laminating sheets of glass using adhesive and exposing the cross sections. My motifs are derived from feelings of gentleness and harshness, fear, limitless expansion experienced through contact with nature, images from music, ethnic conflict, the heart affected by joy and anger, and prayer. In creating my pieces it is like imagining an architectural space when viewing blueprints, deciding on an image by reading into the intentions of the architect, or imbuing a space with dynamic energy to bring it to life.

You can explore more of her work at Yufuku Gallery. (via Art Ruby)

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Crashing Glass Waves Frozen Into Elegant Vessels by Marsha Blaker and Paul DeSomma

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Photo by Paul Schraub

Husband and wife team Paul DeSomma and Marsha Blaker translate their oceanic inspirations directly into their collaborative glass sculptures, frozen glass waves caught mid-crash and appearing to spray surf from the contained vessels. The works exist as seamless gradients, dark blues circling the base while white froth circles the top of the pieces crafted from molten glass.

Although the couple works collaboratively on the vases, they also adhere to individual practices. Blaker focused on the textures and colors found within detailed marine environments while DeSomma’s work emphasizes the clarity and form of colorless and transparent glass.

The couple met at the esteemed Pilchuck Glass School in 1989, marrying shortly after and opening their studio in Live Oak, California in 2001. Together the couple is known internationally for their glass and ceramic work. (via Creative Boom and Amusing Planet)

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo by Paul Schraub

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo courtesy Laughing Dog Gallery

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Photo by Russell Johnson

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Photo by Russell Johnson

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Recycled PET Plastic Bottle Plant Sculptures by Veronika Richterová

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

Czech artist Veronika Richterová creates new life from repurposed plastic PET bottles. For the last decade the artist has used various methods of cutting, heating, and assemblage to build colorfully translucent forms of everything from crocodiles to chandelier light fixtures to plants. Her obsession with plastic bottles doesn’t stop with creating artwork, Richterová has also collected over 3,000 PET plastic objects from 76 countries and writes extensively about the history and usage of plastic in her article A Tribute to PET Bottles. You can see hundreds more sculptures in her online gallery. (via Mister Finch, Lustik)

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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