Tag Archives: sculpture

Spiraling Coral Reefs Assembled from Precisely Cut Wood by Joshua Abarbanel 

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LA-based sculptor Joshua Abarbanel fabricates wood sculptures and installations reminiscent of coral reefs comprised of concentric flower-like blooms. The artist builds both smaller standalone artworks that rest on a pedestal and larger wall or ceiling-mounted pieces that seem to grow organically in every direction. Each piece first takes shape on a computer before being cut from assorted woods with the aid of a laser cutter. From Abarbanel’s artists statement:

Finding inspiration in fractals, accretive formations, and the Fibonacci sequence, Abarbanel creates art that often simultaneously evokes microscopic and aerial perspectives, such that the compositions serve as metaphors for archetypal relationships between people, between individuals and communities, and between humankind and the planet. His work also illustrates how disparate parts can come together to make a whole in beautiful and startling ways.

Abarbanel recently opened an exhibition of work at Porch Gallery in Ojai, California through May 29, 2016. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Amorphous Technicolor Blobs That Appear to Ooze From Gallery Shelves by Dan Lam 

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All images via Dan Lam

Covered in tiny, multicolored spikes of acrylic paint, Dan Lam's oozing sculptures seem nearly radioactive, glowing as if lit by some unnatural source. The pieces are intended to sit at the edge of a ledge or against a wall, appearing to be pulled by gravity towards the earth. To create these alien-like beings Lam uses polyurethane foam and epoxy resin as a base. Letting the foam grow on its own, she guides the form only slightly, letting drips happen organically.

Lam produced the series as a part of a continued study of beauty and disgust—dually attracting and repelling those that come in contact with her sculptures. “I take cues from nature, food, and the human body,” Lam told The Creator’s Project. “By not directly referencing one thing in particular, I try to create something that addresses both attraction and repulsion, making objects that exist in-between.”

You can see more of Lam’s neon spiked sculptures and drippy forms on her Instagram. (via Booooooom)

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Edouard Martinet’s Masterfully Sculpted Animals and Insects Made from Bicycle, Car, and Motorcycle Parts 

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Robin. Bronze, one of an edition of 12 copies, 22 x 32 x 18 cm. LEGS: springs , pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: children’s tricycle fender; FEATHERS: hood ornament of a Citroen; WINGS: petrol tank plates of a 50s motorcycle Monet-Goyon, bike chain guards; TAIL: car part, motorcycle decoration; EYES: marbles; HEAD: two seed scoops, ornaments for bike lights; BEAK: autoscope part, bike ornament.

French artist Edouard Martinet assembles faithful interpretations of birds, crustaceans, insects, and other creatures with countless objects from discarded bicycles, cars, and household objects. A bicycle pump forms the abdomen of a dragonfly, windshield wipers serve as the legs of a fly, or the metal logos of a bicycle manufacturer are layered to create the dense scales of a fish. All the more incredible considering Martinet never welds or solders his pieces, but instead uses only screws or fasteners, selecting only the perfect components that “fit” each assemblage like a puzzle. From Sladmore Contemporary:

What sets Martinet’s work apart is the brilliant formal clarity of his sculptures, and their extraordinary elegance of articulation. His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life.

Martinet will open a new exhibition of work at Sladmore Contemporary in London starting May 5th, 2016.

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Dragonfly, 115 x 54 x 80 cm. ABDOMEN: bicycle pump; THORAX: four bike rear lights, two small car lights, big upholstery tacks , gas cap, ball furniture casters; HEAD: two old bike headlights, inside round sunglasses, shoe tree parts, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth), under the head parts of acetylene bike lights; LEGS: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, cream chargers; WINGS: umbrella ribs, fencing wire, aluminium metal mesh.

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Dragonfly, detail.

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Fly, 47 x 40 x 27 cm. LEGS : windshield wiper arms, bike brakes, bike chains, small typewriter parts; HEAD: motor vehicle rear light; PROBOSCIS: car hood hinge; ANTENNAE: ski boot fasteners; THORAX: motorbike headlight; On the top : 50’s kitchen utensil. WINGS: the glass is set in a windscreen brush holder, the wing ribs are made with soldering wire; ABDOMEN: motorbike headlight, part of ceiling lamp.

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Fly, detail.

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Toad

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Sardine, 25 x 70 x 11 cm. BODY: Moped chain guard covered with multiple bicycle logo badges; HEAD: Solex front fenders, car bumpers. EYES: Flashlights; GILLS: Car door parts, bicycle chain guards. TAIL: Motorbike exhaust pipe; FINS: Cake tins.

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Sardine, detail.

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Black Swift, 45 x 20 x 17 cm. LEGS: springs, pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: silver sauce jug; WINGS and FEATHERS: petrol tank plates of a 50s Villier motorcycle, bike chain guards, scooter decoration; TAIL: car decoration; EYES: metal balls; HEAD: one seed scoop, bike headlight; BEAK: dental forceps.

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Black Swift, detail.

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Praying Mantis, 104 x 50 x 74 cm. ABDOMEN: bike fender, car ventilator and ski boots fasteners; WINGS: rear lights of a Peugeot 404; HEAD: two moped indicators; TOP FORELEGS: car mirror handles, ham slicers, nutcracker handles, spaghetti tongs; FOR ALL THE LEGS: the ends are parts from bike brakes plus a bit of bike chain; THE OTHER LEGS: windshield wiper arms, aluminium tubes; THORAX: car bumper, car mirror handles.

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Futurist Architecture Formed From Neatly Stacked Chewing Gum by Sam Kaplan 

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All images provided by Sam Kaplan

Commercial photographer Sam Kaplan‘s latest project, Unwrappedtransforms sticks of chewing gum into monumental structures, stacking the sticky treat in shapes that imitate architectural forms. Hundreds of pieces of gum criss cross and stand upwards to create pyramids, columns, and arches—held tightly together with support from super glue. Each image within the series received minimal editing, the final image coming from a single shot rather than one that was digitally combined.

Kaplan was initially interested in finding a way to manipulate a material into a 3D pattern, rather than finding a way to photograph gum. “I wanted to find a material that could be both repeatable and remain uniform,” said Kaplan. “I also wanted a high level of malleability and after a lot of trial and error I landed on gum. I have always been interested in futurist and Mayan architecture, and this project was a way to combine both of those to make new forms.”

For Kaplan the most difficult thing about the shoot was having to unwrap nearly 500 individual pieces for each image. You can see behind-the-scenes videos and more of Kaplan’s two and three dimensional patterns on his Instagram. (via Under Consideration)

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New Plaster Cast Tiles That Immortalize Flowers and Veggies by Rachel Dein 

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Carrot by Rachel Dein, all images via the artist’s Etsy.

Rachel Dein (previously) chooses to immortalize plants that might otherwise wither away shortly after their appearance in the spring. Dein places theses flowers, vegetables, and foliage in arrangements within clay, making an impression of the plants before applying a layer of plaster. Once hardened, the initial clay is peeled way to reveal a relief formed by the delicate leaves and buds. A silicon rubber mold is then used to cast each tile in plaster using the shades of light white, green, or blue.

Dein sells her botanical work on her Etsy shop, a selection of which will be included in the Chelsea Flower Show this May, and in her first solo exhibition at Hampton Court this July. You can see more of her plant-based tiles on her Instagram.

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Honesty, Lavender, Californian Poppy, Clematis seed head, Salvia and Achillia in Blue Wedgwood

Honesty, Lavender, Californian Poppy, Clematis seed head, Salvia and Achillia in Blue Wedgwood

Snowdrops

Snowdrops

Long Carrot in Emerald Green Wedgwood

Long Carrot in Emerald Green Wedgwood

Cyclamens

Cyclamens

Daisy, Dandelion and Bramble in Blue Wedgwood

Daisy, Dandelion and Bramble in Blue Wedgwood

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Grasses

Honesty in Blue Wedgwood

Honesty in Blue Wedgwood

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Peas in Duck Egg Blue Wedgwood

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Miniature Treehouse Sculptures Built Around Houseplants by Jedediah Voltz 

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LA-based artist Jedediah Corwyn Voltz constructs miniature treehouses wrapped around common houseplants or bonsai trees in his new sculptural series titled Somewhere Small. Voltz relies on over a decade of commercial prop making for film and other projects to craft each structure from scratch using small bits of wood, silk fabric, miniature artworks, and semi precious stones that are hidden throughout. To-date he’s produced some 25 little habitats that resemble everything from tiny watchtowers in secluded forests, to large bustling windmills or water wheels.

The pieces you see here will be on view at Virgil Normal in LA starting April 23. (thnx, jake!)

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