Tag Archives: sculpture

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian sculpture porcelain China ceramics

Chinese artist Ah Xian lives and works in Sydney where for nearly two decades he has explored aspects of the human form using ancient Chinese craft methods including porcelain, lacquer, jase, bronze, and even concrete. The artist often uses busts of his own family members including his wife, brother, and father onto which he imprints traditional designs with a vivid cobalt blue glaze. Via Asia Society:

These sculptures by Ah Xian establish a series of multilayered oppositions. The most overt is the tension between the sculptural form of the bust and the painted surface designs, which the artist likens to the oppositions of West and East. The bust is part of a Western portraiture tradition dating back to the busts of ancient Roman times and the designs are derived from Chinese decorative traditions, unique to China and in some cases to the studio-kilns at Jingdezhen. Such an opposition can also be seen as the relationship between the personal (since many of the busts are of Ah Xian’s family, including his wife, brother, and father) and the political (a statement about the artist’s own Chinese heritage articulated outside China).

The works collected here are mostly from his Human Human and China China series, though you can see many more works on Craft Australia. (via I Need a Guide)

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Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita creates beautiful textile sculptures of months, butterflies, and other insects with various textiles and embroidery techniques. The pieces are quite large, measuring nearly a foot wide and contain other flourishes including painting, feathers, and artificial fur. You can many of her most recent pieces here. (via the Jealous Curator)

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Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions
Jo Fitzpatrick‎

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

Dramatic Stainless Steel Wire Fairies by Robin Wight wire sculpture fairies dandelions

UK sculptor Robin Wight creates dramatic scenes of wind-blown fairies clutching dandelions, clinging to trees, and seemingly suspended in midair, all with densely wrapped forms of stainless steel wire. The artist currently has several pieces on view at the Trentham Gardens and sells a number of DIY wire sculpting kits from his website where he also discusses in great detail how each piece is built. See more over on Facebook. (via Reddit).

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Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri wax sculpture geometric bees

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri wax sculpture geometric bees

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri wax sculpture geometric bees

Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri wax sculpture geometric bees

Artist and beekeeper Ren Ri employs bees in the construction of these amazing encapsulated sculptures. The artist first builds transparent polyhedrons and cubes with an inner framework of wooden dowels, at the center of which he places the queen. After introducing the rest of the hive, he then rotates the sculpture every seventh day based on the roll of a die, an act that he says references the biblical concept of creation. Not only does the dice roll create an element of randomness, but it also changes the effect of gravity, causing the bees to build in different directions resulting in more evenly dispersed forms.

While we’ve seen several artists using honeycomb as a medium such as Aganetha Dyck and Tomáš Libertiny, Ri seems to put slightly more emphasis on the beehive itself as being the primary form on display. You can see a few more photos over on his website. (via iGnant, Huffington Post)

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A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC trash sculpture plastic New York multiples installation clouds

All photos by Chuck Choi courtesy Studio KCA

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC trash sculpture plastic New York multiples installation clouds

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC trash sculpture plastic New York multiples installation clouds

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC trash sculpture plastic New York multiples installation clouds

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC trash sculpture plastic New York multiples installation clouds

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC trash sculpture plastic New York multiples installation clouds

If you visited Governor’s Island in New York last summer you most certainly saw the billowing, cloud-like structure that sits in the middle of the lawn. And if you’re anything like my kids you probably dashed up to it to see exactly what thing was. But it’s not until you get up close that you realize it’s made from many, many plastic bottles stringed together. “53,780 used plastic bottles,” says designer Jason Klimoski, “the number thrown away in NYC in just 1 hour.” Klimoski and his team at STUDIO KCA collected the bottles – a combination of milk jugs and water bottles – and lashed them together to create “Head in the Clouds,” a pavilion people can walk into, sit inside, and contemplate just how much plastic is thrown away every day.

The structure, however, was temporary and the team is now looking for its next home. If you’re interested in having this in your back yard get in touch with the designers.

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New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

New Lifelike Paper Birds by Diana Beltran Herrera sculpture paper birds

Year after year, artist and designer Diana Beltran Herrera (previously) continues to astound with her near perfectly accurate reproductions of birds using paper. The fragile sculptures shown here are a mix of private commissions and pieces for several luxury brands who use her work in displays and advertising. Originally from Columbia, Herrera studied in Bogota before spending time in Finland to study ceramic sculpture. She is now currently working on an M.A. in fine art at UWE Bristol and creates paper birds in her spare time. She most recently spoke at Pictoplasma in Berlin and had work at Centrespace in Bristol. You can see many more paper creations over on Flickr. (via Yatzer)

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Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown

Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown sculpture science paper germs

Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown sculpture science paper germs

Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown sculpture science paper germs

Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown sculpture science paper germs

Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown sculpture science paper germs

Outbreak: Hand Cut Paper Microbes and Pathogens by Rogan Brown sculpture science paper germs

Artist Rogan Brown (previously) just completed work on his latest paper artwork titled Outbreak, a piece he describes as an exploration “of the microbiological sublime.” Over four months in the making, the work depicts an array of interconnected sculptures—entirely hand cut from paper—based on the smallest structures found within the human body: cells, microbes, pathogens, and neurons. Outbreak represents nearly four months of tedious planning, cutting and assembly. He shares about his process:

I am inspired in part by the tradition of scientific drawing and model making, and particularly the work of artist-scientists such as Ernst Haeckel. But although my approach involves careful observation and detailed “scientific” preparatory drawings, these are always superseded by the work of the imagination; everything has to be refracted through the prism of the imagination, estranged and in some way transformed.

You can see more details over in his portfolio.

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