Tag Archives: sculpture

Broken Liquid: New Bodies of Water Sculpted from Layered Glass by Ben Young

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Glass artist Ben Young (previously here and here) just shared a glimpse of his latest sculptural works made from layers of cut laminate window panes. The bodies of water depicted in Young’s work are usually cut into cross-sections akin to textbook illustrations, creating translucent geometric islands that can appear both monolithic or chamsic.

“I hope viewers might imagine the work as something ‘living’ that creates the illusion of space, movement, depth and sense of spatial being,” Young says. “I like to play with the irony between the glass being a solid material and how I can form such natural and organic shapes.” The self-taught artist, furniture maker, and surfer has explored the properties of cut glass for over a decade at his Sydney studio. Here’s a bit more about his processes via Kirra Galleries:

Each of Young’s sculptural works are hand drawn, hand cut and handcrafted from clear sheet float glass made for windows, then laminated layer upon layer to create the final form. He constructs models, draws templates, makes custom jigs and then cuts the layers with a glazier’s hand-tool. The complexity comes from the planning phase, where he says “I do a lot of thinking before I even start to draw or cut.” He then sketches the concept by hand and creates a plan using traditional technical drawing techniques: “I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished piece. Sometimes my starting point changes dramatically as I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes.” The texture and colour of the glass varies in every piece according to its thickness and arrangement.

Young opens a new exhibition of work along with artist Peter Nilsson titled Float at Kirra Galleries this evening in Melbourne.

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Guillaume Lachapelle’s Mirrored Dioramas Create the Illusion of Infinite Space

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Canadian artist Guillaume Lachapelle explores the infinite in this series of mysterious 3D printed dioramas titled Visions. Sitting atop pedestals in a darkened gallery, the eerie “rooms” rely on lights and mirrors to create the illusion of vast spaces that seem to reflect into much larger open spaces. These pieces were on view last year as part of a solo show at Art Mur in Québec, and you can see more of them up close over on Artsy.

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Kenyan Artist Digs Through Electronic Refuse and Found Metal to Create Dazzling Sculptural Eyewear

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Digging through electronic refuse and found metal in Kenya’s capital of Nairobi, Cyrus Kabiru refashions found materials into different wearable forms. Often these take the form of flamboyantly composed glasses, large eyewear that can often mask the entire face.

Kabiru explains that his glasses obsession started at a young age, and blossomed as his father crushed his dreams of owning his own pair. “When I was young, I used to admire real glasses but my dad was a bit harsh and he never wanted me to have real glasses. That’s the reason I started making the glasses.”

His creations situate themselves in several different areas of art, shuffling between performance, sculpture, and fashion—embodying the playfulness of the youth generation in Nairobi. “When you walk in town and you see someone with my glasses, the glasses will [get] all your attention,” said Kabiru. “If you have any stress it is like a therapy.”

In addition to his found object sculptures and glasses, Kabiru is a self-taught painter, his subject matter being humorous portrayal of contemporary Kenyan life. His most recent series uses thousands of bottle caps sewn together to depict African nature. “I really love trash. I try to give trash a second chance. I change it to be something else, which is like it will stay for more than 100 years now.” (via prosthetic knowledge)

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The Sandy Beach Architecture of Calvin Seibert

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Artist Calvin Seibert (previously) recently completed a new series of his geometrically precise sand castles on the beaches of Hawaii. A professional sculptor, Seibert seems to borrow angular ideas from Bauhaus architecture or the flair of Frank Gehry. How he’s able to control the sand so perfectly is anyone’s guess, it certainly puts my traditional upside down bucket method to shame. You can see more of his work over the last few years here.

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Cybele Young’s Paper Sculptures Depict Everyday Objects Metamorphosing into Otherworldly Creatures

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I Thought They Worked Better. Paper. 33 x 28 x 2.5 in.

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I Thought They Worked Better. Detail.

A pair of yellow headphones. A violin case. A set of keys. All miniature objects faithfully crafted from Japanese papers by Toronto-based artist Cybele Young, any one of which would be considered striking in its own right, but she doesn’t stop there. Each object, however mundane, is displayed step-by-step in a dramatic process of metamorphosis as it transforms into unusual organic lifeforms. A pair of rollerskates gradually becomes a network of fungus-like membranes, or an ordinary handbag grows an unnerving coat of sharp spikes. From her artist statement:

Engaging with abstract and familiar motifs, I juxtapose sculptures to create a sense of dialogue or play between them. I approach my work in series and components, ultimately building an ongoing inventory of personal experience and observation.

I compile these in various arrangements to create communities that interact and form new relationships – much like the small seemingly insignificant moments in our everyday lives that come together to create unexpected outcomes. These manifest as miniature theatres – one act plays, where shifts of scale and perception occur. Despite the absence of the human form there is an implied presence, where the viewer can project themselves into another world.

Young’s work is currently on view for two more days at Forum Gallery in New York, so don’t miss it. (via Colossal Submissions, thnx David!)

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You Know That Place. Paper. 30 x 40 x 4 in.

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If I Had Learned Earlier. Paper. 22 x 35 x 2.5 in.

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In Close Range. Paper. 24 x 35 x 2.5 in.

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It Came With Me Everywhere. Paper. 19 x 38 x 4 in.

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It’s Worth it This Time. Paper hair curler, coils. 21 x 32 x 2 in.

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It’s Worth it This Time. Detail.

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I Was Thinking of Something Else. Paper lawn chair, leaves. 17 x 24 x 3 in.

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Cecilia Levy Produces Eggshell-Thin Cups and Saucers Out of Spiderman Comics and Century-Old Books

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Swedish artist Cecilia Levy creates cups, saucers, bowls, plates and saucers out of paper, turning delicate 2D materials into layered 3D sculptures. Although she often uses books from the beginning of the last century, her choices are not narrow as she has also utilized Spiderman comics for an entire series.

To create each work, she takes apart the books, magazines, and comics, tearing the pages and pasting small pieces of them back together. Levy explains her works are, “eggshell thin, yet remarkably steady. The story lives on, but in a different shape.”

Cecilia Levy’s background is in graphic design and bookbinding, but began to experiment with dissecting books to produce different shapes in 2009. Since 2013 Levy has worked full time as a paper artist, exhibiting her work in both Sweden and abroad.

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Elaborate New Laser-Cut Paper Windows by Eric Standley Borrow Patterns from Art History and Architecture

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Ithica. Cut paper, 20″ x 26″, 2015.

In an exquisite nexus of mathematics, art history, and technology, artist Eric Standley (previously) creates densely stacked layers of laser-cut paper to form sculptures reminiscent of Islamic architecture or Gothic rose windows. If you’ve followed the artist’s work here on Colossal it’s clear his understanding of geometry, shape and color as it applies to paper structures has expanded greatly over the last few years as his artworks grow increasingly intricate and detailed. The pieces have also grown in scale and depth with his latest pieces standing over two feet tall.

Standley currently has work on view at CODA Paper Art 2015 and at MOCA through August 16th, 2015. He also has numerous pieces currently available through Marta Hewett Gallery.

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Ithica. Detail.

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Agawam. Cut paper, 20″ x 26″, 2015.

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Agawam, detail.

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Agawam, detail.

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Either/Or Circle 9.5.1. Cut paper. 20″ x 20″. 2015.

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Either/Or Circle 9.5.1. Detail.

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Either/Or Tetragon 7.2.3. Cut paper, watercolor, 8″ x 10″, 2015.

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