Tag Archives: sculpture

Minimally Painted Wood Sculptures That Highlight Environmental Decay by Willy Verginer 

Italian sculptor Willy Verginer (previously) creates figurative sculptures from wood, pieces that allow his carving skills to stand out with minimal additions of monochrome bands of paint. The oranges, greens, and blues he adds places his subjects into unseen environments, like his sculpture of a small child who appears to swim through detritus covered in dark blue paint. Other sculptures also point towards environmental decay, such as a figure that clutches a leaking gas can, and a stag that is altered by the oil canisters that serves as its base.

Verginer’s newest work is included in the group exhibition After Industry at Wasserman Projects in Detroit through April, 8 2017. You can see more of his minimally painted sculptures on his Instagram. (via Fubiz)

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Elegant Wooden Birds Dipped in Watercolor Plumage by Moisés Hernández 

Immersed Birds, 2017. Ash and watercolor.

Mexican designer Moisés Hernández brings his distinct flair for minimalism to this new series of avian sculptures titled Immersed Birds. Each piece is a continuous wooden object milled with CNC technology which is then dipped into a carefully considered sequence of watercolors. The overlaying hues mimic the plumage of a toucan, hummingbird, and Mexican quetzal. You can see more of Hernández’s work on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

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Traveling Landscapes: Miniature Ecosystems Tucked Inside Vintage Suitcases by Kathleen Vance 

As part of her ongoing series titled Traveling Landscapes, New York-based artist Kathleen Vance constructs entire landscapes inside of old steamer trunks and repurposed luggage. Many of the pieces incorporate real running water, soil, and living plant life to form encapsulated environments, though others are constructed from common model making materials and resin. The pieces are intended to speak to the fragility of drinking water reservoirs and issues of water rights. She shares in her artist statement:

Materials that are commonly defined as natural and artificial are combined in the creation of these works, isolating aspects that are indicative of the ‘natural’ (while sometimes are considered unnatural). The landscapes created are transformative in their illusion of a nature scene; they are contained in traveling cases to magnify the displacement of a seemingly natural landscape in an unusual framework. These pieces extenuate the desire for ‘untouched’ natural environments, and the claim and proprietorship that are placed on plots of land, which carries over to water rights.

Vance recently unveiled a larger site-specific installation titled Traveling Landscape: Precious Cargo with ROCKELMANN & at VOLTA NY 2017. (via Art Ruby, Inhabitat)

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Magnificent Cardboard Airships by Jeroen van Kesteren 

Over the last year, Netherlands-based artist Jeroen van Kesteren has been toiling away at these sculptural airships as part of a series titled Orphanage for Lost Adventures. Made primarily from cardboard, aluminum foil, adhesives, and an assortment of papers used for sails and propellers, the whimsical flying machines have a distinct steampunk feel. The pieces range from 40 to 50 centimeters tall and take about a month to make. Jeroen shares additional images of the airships and several additional sculptures on Pinterest. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Statue of a Defiant Girl Now Confronts the Famous ‘Charging Bull’ on Wall St. 

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If you happen to walk by the famous bronze Charging Bull statue in New York’s financial district today you’ll discover a fantastic new addition: a small girl in a defiant and unflinching pose now stands just feet away from the tip of the wild bull’s horns. The bronze sculpture was installed on Tuesday morning as part of a joint effort between State Street Global Advisors (a $2.5 trillion asset manager) and city officials just ahead of International Women’s Day. The artwork is part of a campaign to pressure companies to add more women to their boards, but will surely speak more broadly as symbol of women’s rights and empowerment within society as a whole.

Lori Heinel, the deputy global chief investment officer at State Street shares with Business Insider:

“One of the most iconic images on Wall Street is the charging bull. So the idea of having a female sort of stand against the bull or stand up to the bull just struck us as a very clever but also creative and engaging way to make that statement. Even though it’s a little girl, her stance is one of determination, forwardness, and being willing to challenge and take on the status quo.”

The statue, officially titled The Fearless Girl, was created by Delaware-based bronze sculptor Kristen Visbal and will remain for at least a month. The piece is already drawing large crowds and extensive coverage in the press. Charging Bull was originally an act of guerrilla art by Arturo Di Modica, and only became permanent after its soaring popularity, leaving some to wonder if Visbal’s statue could follow the same story. You can watch a video about its creation below.

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Imaginative Insects Formed From Resin and Brass by Hiroshi Shinno 

Japanese artist Hiroshi Shinno builds hyperrealistic sculptures of insects that don’t exist, perfect forms of imaginative species that look as if they were built from vibrant leaves and delicate flower petals. Even these aspects of the creatures are false, as each leaf or petal was cast from resin and painted with acrylic paint before being placed on the model’s brass base.

In addition to building these fantastical works, Shinno also sketches the initial ideas for his imaginative creatures in an Insect Diary on his website. You can see more of the Kyoto-born artist’s insect-based sculptures and 3D work on his Tumblr. (via Lustik)

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