Tag Archives: sculpture

New Hand and Laser Cut Paper Microbes by Rogan Brown 


Artist Rogan Brown (previously) recently completed work on his latest menagerie of paper microorganisms titled Magic Circle. The collection of both hand and laser-cut specimens are inspired by tree moss, cell structures, bacteria, coral, diatoms, and radiolaria. The piece will be on view at Aqua Art Fair in Miami through C. Emerson Fine Arts. (via Colossal Submissions)






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Unseen Art: 3D Printing Classical Paintings for the Blind 

Unseen Art

“You can look but you can’t touch.” That’s one of the first rules of museums, which house priceless works of art. But what about the community of blind and visually impaired who use their sense of touch to experience the world? The Unseen Art Project is an initiative to make art more accessible and inclusive by using 3D-printing technology to create replicas of masterpieces that can be touched ’till your heart is content.

“There are many people in the world who have heard of classical artworks their whole lives but are unable to see them,” says Marc Dillon, a Helsinki-based designer who wants to make works like the Mona Lisa touchable. In order to make his vision a reality, Dillon has recently established a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. He hopes to raise enough money to create an online repository where artists can contribute 3D data of artworks and anyone with a 3D printer will be able to print it out.

With the price of 3D printers drastically coming down in recent years, Dillon’s project has the potential to “touch” a large population of people who have an interest in art but have never been able see it. As the campaign points out, “It would be a revolution to get blind people going to art galleries, people hate them because there is nothing there to touch!” (via The Creators Project)

Unseen Art

Unseen Art

Unseen Art

Unseen Art

unseen art (9)

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New Nail Sculptures by John Bisbee That Twist Across Floors and Walls 


John Bisbee (previously) has worked with nails as a sculptural medium since he accidentally toppled a bucket of them years ago and was astonished to see how they remained intact, rusted and fused into a single object. Every since, he’s been hammering nails of varying size into complex patterns, using the smallest woodworking nails up to giant 12-inch spikes. Although nails large and small continue to be the focus of his artistic practice, his sculptures remain diverse in their presentation and composition, twisted works making wildly chaotic patterns against walls and neatly arranged nails snaking along gallery floors.

Bisbee currently has two solo exhibitions on view including “Floresco” at the SCAD Museum of Art (through January 3, 2016) and “Only nails, always different” at the PCA&D Gallery (through the end of December). His work is also included in the 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial titled “You Can’t Get There From Here” through January 3, 2016.












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Riusuke Fukahori’s Lifelike Goldfish Painted in Acrylic Between Layers of Resin 

Kingyo Sukui (The Ark). Wood, net, aluminum, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 73 x 75 x 38 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Japanese artist Riusuke Fukahori (previously) returns to Joshua Liner Gallery this week for his second solo show, Goldfish Salvation. Fukahori has become widely known for his depiction of aquatic life painted with acrylic within layers of resin, most frequently the forms of goldfish as they swim through small wooden boxes or inside bamboo hats. He references dozens of live fish kept in aquariums in his studio as he works, with some pieces taking several months to gradually complete, layer by layer.

The exhibition’s title, Goldfish Salvation, is a personal reference to a time of self-doubt in Fukahori’s own artistic career, and an important revelation that led him out of it. Goldfish have since become a symbol of identity that represent both the strength and weakness of himself and rest of humanity. He shares:

In the aquarium, similar to human society, there is a story of birth and death. As long as they live, these goldfish will continue to soil the fish tank, and if not changed, the water will only get tainted leading to death for all the goldfish. This is quite true for the human species as well… The goldfish that I paint are not really goldfish, but representations of people. I feel as though the fish tank is only foretelling what would happen to the earth in the future. We as human beings are the main source polluting our own air we breathe.

You can see all of the pieces here, plus a number of large acrylic paintings by Fukahori at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York through December 19th. (via Hi-Fructose)

Kingyo Sukui (The Ark). Wood, net, aluminum, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 73 x 75 x 38 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Kingyo Sukui, detail.

Kingyo Sukui, detail.

Kingyo Sukui, detail.

Four Seasons of Rain – Bosan (Autumn). Japanese bamboo hat, epoxy resin and acrylic on iron stand , 2015. 16 x 7.5 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Four Seasons of Rain – Setcho (Winter). Japanese bamboo hat, epoxy resin and acrylic on iron stand , 2015. 16 x 7.5 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Iwashirogamatsu. Epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 5.5 x 3.5 x 1.75 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Tsuzuki. Japanese Cypress sake cup, resin, acrylic, 2015. 3.5 x 3.5 x 2.2 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Kingyo-sake Kochomatsu. Japanese Cypress sake cup, resin, acrylic, 2015. 3.5 x 3.5 x 2.2 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Spring of the Moon. Tub, ladle, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 13.78 x 12.6 x 9.84 in. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Spring of the Moon. Tub, ladle, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 13.78 x 12.6 x 9.84 in. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

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Space Glass: Extraordinary Solar Systems and Flowers Encased in Glass by Satoshi Tomizu 


Glass artist Satoshi Tomizu sculpts small glass spheres that appear to contain entire solar systems and galaxies. Planets made of opals, flecks of real gold, and trails of colored glass seem to spin and loop like twists in the Milky Way. While photographed here in a macro view, the pieces are actually quite small and include a small glass loop so each piece can be turned into a pendant. I can’t help but be reminded of this pivotal scene from the acclaimed Men in Black film.

Tomizu’s glass work recently won a Atelier Nova Design Award and appeared at the Handmade in Japan Festival. You can explore much more of his work in this Facebook gallery and on his website. (via My Modern Met)














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Faig Ahmed Creates Glitched-Out Contemporary Rugs from Traditional Azerbaijani Textiles 


Faig Ahmed distorts the patterns of traditional Azerbaijani rugs, dimantling their structure in order to build compositions that trick the eye by appearing to melt off the wall. By rearticulating the original design, he creates contemporary sculptural forms that look like digital glitches, patterns flatlining halfway through a tapestry or gradually morphing into a digital mosaic.

Ahmed explains that his fascination for textiles stems from their historical value, humanity utilizing fabric for nearly the entire length of human history. “Another thing that interests me is pattern,” says Ahmed. “Patterns and ornaments can be found in all cultures, sometimes similar, sometimes very different. I consider them words and phrases that can be read and translated to a language we understand.”

Ahmed lives and works in Baku, Azerbaijan and graduated from the sculpture department of Azerbaijan State Academy of Fine Art in 2004. The artist previously focused on painting, video, and installation, but now currently focuses on textile and sculpture. Ahmed recently had a solo exhibition with Italian gallery Montoro12 titled “Omnia Mutantur, Nihil Interit,” and is currently in the group exhibition “Crafted: Objects in Flux” at The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston until January 10, 2016. (via Booooooom)









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An Octopus Typewriter by Courtney Brown 


As part of the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art’s annual California Sculpture SLAM, Oakland artist Courtney Brown unveiled this unweildly typing device titled “Self Organization,” that went on to win first place. Brown used a 1938 Underwood typewriter affixed with sculpted bronze tentacles. We can’t wait to read its first book. All of the sculptures from the event are still on view through November 15, 2015.





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